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Thread: SawsStop 10" contractor blade bogs and stops

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    Use a 24T rip blade and do it in a couple or three passes. A thin kerf on a lower powered machine.

    I'm totally with Lee, I also timed myself changing blades 1:43.

    Not to hijack the thread, but I have a question to you guys re: SawStop. I have several blades that even adjust all the way down, its not within the spec distance for the brake. Most are blades I've had sharpened several times.

    I'm using them anyway, my thinking is if tripped, it will only delay the stop time by a few milliseconds -- but, is this bad thinking? I've already had to bench a few blades and one dado set that have shoulders....
    I wouldn't do that, a little hesitation on the brake stopping the blade could mean losing a finger or three. I will just add them to my circular saw collection and buy another blade for the SS or toss.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Kapolei Hawaii
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    3,236
    If the blade is too small the saw won't run. I'm sure that the brake will still function properly after the blades have been sharpened a lot. If it don't run then toss them. I wouldn't worry about using them if the saw starts.

    Back to the original problem, I really think you should get a low tooth count blade. The Glue Line rip has 30 teeth.... I have one, it cuts real nice, but I do have a 5 hp saw...... If I recall, they (Freud) say that it's for ripping up to 4/4 woods. Thicker wood 8/4 it may not do so well, and they caution against it. Memory fades though. I think that because I bought a rip blade that they say not to rip wood that I bought it for. 3" oak. I did anyways. I think my saw (ICS) also shut down. Had to pry the billet off the blade. SO long age, memory fades and can't recall properly.

    As a final note, and please don't start a war about full vs. thin kerf. Depending on how YOU rip, a full kerf MAY be better. Thin kerfs may flutter and may not cut as well. Since you are ripping maple, I'm going to assume that a thin kerf is better, but sometimes, think out of the box.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Central New Jersey
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    681
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen White View Post
    Ya know I haven't cleaned the stock one but will clean these going forward. I just ordered the glue line ripping blade you recommended, thanks!

    I actually had that blade in my cart from research but then decided I didn't want to change blades between rips and crosscut but you convinced me that when I'm settling in to do a large run (doing about a thousand rips this week) that it is worth the time. Also will cut back on jointer runs that will probably easily offset the time of swapping blades. Since it and the combo blades are both 10" of the same brand I might not have to adjust the brake between swaps making the switching even easier.
    I assume the contractor sawstop blade change is about as easy as it is with the sawstop pcs I have. If so, changing blades is about a 2 minute job and well worth it. I made 3 blade changes this morning working on a project. If you store your blades in a handy location, it's even faster. Something I need to work on as I keep them in their packaging to keep them safe.
    Distraction could lead to dismemberment!

  4. #19
    I have a PCS with the 1 3/4 hp motor. I usually use a thin kerf Freud combination blade on it. I think they are better than the blade it came with. When I was making a bunk bed for my grandkids, I had difficulty ripping the legs. They are glued up construction lumber. The rips were thus around 3 inches. I switched to a full kerf ripping blade, a new Infinity blade, and it didn't work well either. Then I switched to a Freud 24 tooth ripping blade (same tooth count as the Infinity) and it worked a lot better, even though it was not new nor completely clean. I think I finished the cuts with that blade but I later got a Freud thin kerf ripping blade.

    120V motors sometimes bog on cuts, especially if the blade is not ideal but normally not on 4/4 material. I suspect the kerf was closing on the blade pinching it. That was what was happening to me on the bed legs. I saw a John Heinz youtube where he recommended backing off and then pushing through again for this - effectively widening the kerf. For something short like you describe that might be a good approach but I don't think it would have worked for me on the bed legs. Driving a wedge into the kerf works if you want to stop the cut. Cutting only part way through would probably work too.

    The stock riving knife is too thick for thin kerf blades. I could not set it where it would not drag on one side or the other. But SawStop sells a thinner riving knife and it is reasonably priced. You have to look at the parts portion of their website to find it, however. I think it was $15.

    I still use full kerf blades sometimes too. Usually they work. But I normally use a thin kerf combination blade and have not had an issue with them for rips in 4x4 material - including hard maple. I also use oak and cherry a lot. I've always used a 120V table saw and I do full depth rips in hardwood when I need to. With the right blade, I don't normally have problems but when the wood acts up, I can. Those instances are rare enough I don't think it justifies a 3hp or 5hp motor. But that is my opinion, everybody is welcome to go another way. But I do change blades and clean blades when I need to.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    The stock riving knife is too thick for thin kerf blades. I could not set it where it would not drag on one side or the other. But SawStop sells a thinner riving knife and it is reasonably priced. You have to look at the parts portion of their website to find it, however. I think it was $15.
    Thanks for all the info, so went to site and see 2.33 and 2.0 knife but still need to see if its compatible to contractors. Is this the one you meant?

    Are you saying when my thin kerf blades come in today I wont be able to use them with the kerf blade or that it will just not be optimum?

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    858
    Forgive me if this was mentioned already. I did read the thread at different times but don't remember.

    Did you check the arbor nut to make sure the blade is tight and not slipping on the arbor?

    Did you check the belt tension to make sure the belt is not slipping on the pulleys?

    Just a couple thoughts. In case they were not mentioned previously...
    Too much to do...Not enough time...life is too short!

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen White View Post
    Thanks for all the info, so went to site and see 2.33 and 2.0 knife but still need to see if its compatible to contractors. Is this the one you meant?

    Are you saying when my thin kerf blades come in today I wont be able to use them with the kerf blade or that it will just not be optimum?
    Stephen, this a helpful article about thin kerf blades and the riving knife. Trent Davis is a technical guru and service representative with SawStop.
    https://www.trentdavis.net/wp/2019/1...riving-knives/
    He also has a Facebook group for SawStop owners.

  8. #23
    Hey thanks Thomas, will check it out!

    Thanks for the suggestions Bill, Checked and I don't think the belt is loose and the stock blade had been used for hundreds (maybe a thousand plus) 2' rips and I think it was dull and just not cutting well. I blew it not checking the codes.


    -----
    got the new combo last night and used this morning for 25-30 rips on hard maple. It was of course much better than the dull blade and often went through like butter but it seemed to me having a problem with the riving knife being a bit too thick as Jim said above and a couple of cuts bogged down again but the saw didn't error so I went and ordered the slimmer riving knife from SS. $15 part but with the $14 shipping so it was $30. The stock is 2.3mm and this one is 2.0 so it is just a bit less girth.

    Today I have the thin rip blade coming in so will see just how much of an improvement that is. I have about 800 rips backed up now and counting so hope this will get me back in business.
    Last edited by Stephen White; 12-03-2021 at 11:45 AM.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    Stephen, this a helpful article about thin kerf blades and the riving knife. Trent Davis is a technical guru and service representative with SawStop.
    https://www.trentdavis.net/wp/2019/1...riving-knives/
    He also has a Facebook group for SawStop owners.
    great article. Ya know I ordered the thin riv b4 I saw your post but I think I am still glad to have both of them in my box. I am not sure I will ever use the blade guard so might be fine for me going forward just tightening the clamp to the new riv knive and going forward.

    The article mentioned just putting some tape on the 2.0mm rk to shim so they both work, is this a really bad idea?

  10. #25
    Shimming the riving knife might mean you do not have to change the clamp location on the saw. If it does, I do not see where it would be a problem. I think mine ended up working with both riving knives without having to move it.

    The thicker riving knife will work with the thin kerf blade but I had to set it where it was pushing the offcut away from the blade a little. If the offcut is thin and flexible, it works OK. But if the offcut is thicker, it wants to pull the workpiece away from the rip fence. So I decided it was worth it to get the thinner one.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    Shimming the riving knife might mean you do not have to change the clamp location on the saw. If it does, I do not see where it would be a problem. I think mine ended up working with both riving knives without having to move it.

    The thicker riving knife will work with the thin kerf blade but I had to set it where it was pushing the offcut away from the blade a little. If the offcut is thin and flexible, it works OK. But if the offcut is thicker, it wants to pull the workpiece away from the rip fence. So I decided it was worth it to get the thinner one.
    Hey Jim, I'm left handed and I feel the most comfortable with the rip on the outside (left) using a feather board for consistent width as I lean over the fence and feed with left hand unlike someone who is feeding with right hand/push stick straight through. Would love to do it the other way so I wouldn't need to keep moving fence left after each rip but just don't have the right control feel with my right hand feeding and don't like that feeling working with a saw, even one with a brake.

    so I think what is happening is that feather board is keeping the left side tight and fence on right is causing just a slight pinch as the board feeds around the riv knife and tries to expand that little bit that is sticking out and that's all it takes. Not happening every time prob because the riv knife is above and away from feather board but like 1 in 10 but when it does the feed stops and the board is pinched around the blade spinning out. No SS error but I have to still turn off and start over and the rip width is then wrong by a few mm.
    Last edited by Stephen White; 12-03-2021 at 11:18 AM.

  12. #27
    I would make sure the feather board is not past the front of the blade. Itís a bad deal to have the feather board pushing the wood against the left side of the blade and the right side piece between the blade and fence. A feather board should only hold the wood against the fence so it must be located before the cut starts
    gary

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Markham View Post
    I would make sure the feather board is not past the front of the blade. It’s a bad deal to have the feather board pushing the wood against the left side of the blade and the right side piece between the blade and fence. A feather board should only hold the wood against the fence so it must be located before the cut starts
    gary
    yeah its before the blade and prob does not even have anything to do with the issue. This morning with the thin kerf and 2.33 riv knive I did a few dozen rips and on several of them the feed stopped and the board was, at least it seemed like to me, binding behind the blade. The riv knife is clearly a little wider than the blade so I guess it spreads a bit in the cut and then about 10-12 inches in they came to a stop with my normal pressure, maybe I could have pushed it through with an extra push but I don't do that with tools. Normally with the regular pressure I use, these 7"-10" wide, 2' boards move easily through the blade and I get 3-4 1 1/2" rips from each board. With the new blade on the other 98% it was like cutting through butter and my problem was solved from my original problem of using the dull blade and writing this post. It must be the thin kerf and the riv knife because until yesterday I have done probably close to a 1000 of these rips through 7 different hard woods with zero problems until a couple of days ago when the blade became just too dull.

    I am hoping the new 2.0 riv knife will solve the issue.
    Last edited by Stephen White; 12-02-2021 at 9:14 PM.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen White View Post
    I wouldn't do that, a little hesitation on the brake stopping the blade could mean losing a finger or three. I will just add them to my circular saw collection and buy another blade for the SS or toss.
    Interesting, I couldn't edit this post. I just wanted to correct myself because while I was researching setting my brake to the new blade I see that as Kyle said I am wrong and the SS simply will not run if brake is too far from blade. I'm still going to toss anything that wont space with the spacer but I guess you don't have too.

  15. #30
    Stephen,

    It sounds like you have the riving knife positioned a little too close to the rip fence. I think the riving knife clamps away from the rip fence so it may resolve the issue. If not, it is not hard to move the riving knife position. There are little teeth you use so it isn't infinitely variable. Shifting it a tooth away from the rip fence may solve the binding but it may also create the issue I described earlier where the offcut, if significant in width, tries to pull the work away from the fence. I could not find a position that worked well with the thicker knife and a thin kerf blade. But with the thinner knife, my cuts are good.

    Jim

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