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Thread: Anyone using a Onefinity CNC?

  1. #16
    I'm about 30 days into using mine. I did the buy once/cry once and bought Vectric Vcarve Pro. Learning this is complicated enough, without having to fight software. If you can use PSP or PowerPoint, you can use Vcarve.

    The machine is POWERFUL. The stepper motors are strong, and if you don't respect the machine it will snap a 1/4" shank bit in a hearbeat. That said, it's incredibly stable and I think it's easily the best 'hobbyist' CNC you can get. If you add a 2.2HP 220V spindle it's getting into the power and performance of a commericial CNC.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    1,860
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Thanks Alex. I would get the touchpad and game controller joypad, too. With the monitor, what's the connection to the machine, USB or something special? And I'm sure I'll get a spindle for it at some point. I'll probably by the mount when I purchase the machine but start learning with my Makita knockoff router and then buy a spindle when I know a little more.

    What software are you using?

    John
    The display part uses a HDMI connection while the touch part uses a USB. The 1F controller doesn't support USB 3.x thumb drives so I would guess it also doesn't support a touch monitor with a USB 3.x connection but I can't confirm that.

    I'm still using the free version of Fusion 360. Sooner or later I'll buy V-carve Pro but not until I have the time to learn the software. I have the free version on my laptop but I've been too busy to play with it.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    8,123
    Thanks for that info. Paul. I used to be very proficient with Powerpoint back in my corporate days; pretty simple stuff actually, so if VCarve is at that level I'll be fine. I suspect I'll get the spindle pretty quick, maybe when I buy the machine.

    John

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Grand Forks, ND
    Posts
    2,318
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    It's kinda like a gun with and without the PPS system
    Well now you're preaching to the choir!! lol thats a comparison John will relate well to.
    A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. My desk is a work station.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    1,535
    Got my wasteboard frame, this past Saturday, so did a quick assembly of the main components to guesstimate the table/cabinet size that I'm about to start building. Top will be 2000mm x 1400mm.


  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Leander, TX
    Posts
    197
    I've had my OF for almost a year and I'm just now getting the hang of it. Mostly because one of my kids plays select baseball and that takes a lot of weekends. I've recently done two sign projects that are in the finishing stage and they came out great. I've been using the free version of Fusion 360 and so far it has done everything I need with the bonus that I can use it with my 3D printer. I went the spindle route. It is way more complicated to set up, but it is so quiet. The vacuum is louder than the spindle.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,594
    That looks really great, Chris. I'm glad to see you were generous with space as it will come in handy while working with the machine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    8,123
    I placed my order for the Journeyman yesterday, with V-Carve Pro. I'm starting with the palm router. After I gain some knowledge, burn out the router, or get tired of it screaming, I'll upgrade to a spindle.

    I've been playing around with Cut2D Pro for the past week or so, until I decided to just go with V-Carve Pro. I have proven I can pull 2D SketchUp parts into Cut2D (as someone said I could). I've also found drawing 2D shapes in Cut2D is pretty easy. Tool pathing looks pretty straight forward, too, but I'm sure I'll get my comeupance once I push the start button.

    Thanks for the input everyone. Now, does anyone know if a coordinate probe can be hooked up to a 1F? I have a friend who makes Hal Taylor chairs and using the CNC to rough carve the arms and seat would really save him some time. Thanks.

    John

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,594
    Congratulations on your order!

    If you found C2D easy, VCP will be equally easy...same UI. Start working on the Vectric training that's available for free online. "Start at the very beginning..." (la la la) and work your way through as the knowledge builds.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #25
    How is cable management handled on these machines?

    V Carve is a very capable drawing program but quite different from Sketchup. Node editing is a key concept. The training videos are well worth going through.

    Many cutting errors can be avoided by careful checking of various parameters - correct origin placement, bit registration to the table or workpiece surface, cut depth and so forth. The VCP previews are very helpful. If you can view the g-code in your controller editor that will tell you a lot, as will a preview of the toolpath on your table (distinct from the VCP preview) to make sure your workpiece is where the system thinks it is. Working off the material base can avoid digging to China.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
    Posts
    680
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    How is cable management handled on these machines?
    Its not. The z stepper uses a flexy cord. the rest of the cabling is run outside of the unit with the exception of what is run through the x and y rails.

    There is a kit available from Route 1 woodworking with 3d printed parts to create a cable tray for drag chains. That is the route I went. Mine isnt finished I waited 10 days for water cooling line that came in the wrong size so now Im waiting again for the correct one to come in. Then i can close up the drag chain and start on the DC and test.
    20211213_053410.jpg

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by George Yetka View Post
    Its not. The z stepper uses a flexy cord. the rest of the cabling is run outside of the unit with the exception of what is run through the x and y rails.

    There is a kit available from Route 1 woodworking with 3d printed parts to create a cable tray for drag chains. That is the route I went. Mine isnt finished I waited 10 days for water cooling line that came in the wrong size so now Im waiting again for the correct one to come in. Then i can close up the drag chain and start on the DC and test.
    20211213_053410.jpg
    Do you operate your machine in the vertical position, or is that for storage?

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
    Posts
    680
    Its staying up there. Onefinity has a wall mount kit.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    8,123
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Congratulations on your order!

    If you found C2D easy, VCP will be equally easy...same UI. Start working on the Vectric training that's available for free online. "Start at the very beginning..." (la la la) and work your way through as the knowledge builds.
    Thanks. I've been through the key tutorials with Cut2D and it seems pretty straight forward; I'm sure I'll be in for some rude awakenings when I actually put tool to wood. I had a bit of hassle getting my copy of VCarve Pro registered but finally sorted it out (Hint: Use only one Email account for both Vectric and Onefinity), so now I'm ready to start looking at VCarve to see what added features it has. In the beginning, I think I'll mostly be a 2.5D user for cabinets and furniture, but I'm sure I'll want to do relief carving at some point.

    Now the long wait. I'm cleaning up my shop, get rid of stuff, and designing a bench for the machine to sit on. One key feature I plan to incorporate into the bench is the ability to remove part of the tabletop so that I can clamp workpiece vertically. That will allow me to cut dovetails, etc. in the ends of workpieces without having to use dog ears or whatever it's called when cutting flat so the parts will fit.

    John

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    8,123
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    How is cable management handled on these machines?

    V Carve is a very capable drawing program but quite different from Sketchup. Node editing is a key concept. The training videos are well worth going through.

    Many cutting errors can be avoided by careful checking of various parameters - correct origin placement, bit registration to the table or workpiece surface, cut depth and so forth. The VCP previews are very helpful. If you can view the g-code in your controller editor that will tell you a lot, as will a preview of the toolpath on your table (distinct from the VCP preview) to make sure your workpiece is where the system thinks it is. Working off the material base can avoid digging to China.
    Thanks Keven. As George said, there's no cable management unless you do some add-ons, which I plan to at some point. Yes, I saw in one of the videos how node editing is a key feature to eliminating errant tool paths. Drawing directly in Cut2D, and likely VCarve isn't too hard; however, I prefer SketchUp when I design cabinets and furniture because I work in 3D. At this point, it looks pretty straightforward to send 2D files of the parts to Cut2D, etc. The ones I've tried it with came in w/o issue.

    One feature that looks perfect for my needs is nesting. It will maximize the number of parts that I can get out of sheet as well as tell me how many sheets I'll need. No more doodling on paper. And in some cases more parts than I could get manually with my traditional machines. It's all pretty exciting.

    Now about that 10 - 12 week wait for it to ship. Ugh.

    John

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