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Thread: Another cutting board glue question

  1. #16
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    Stan -- If you use the right epoxy, you should be fine. However, not all epoxies are waterproof. For example, SystemThree's Quick Cure (their 5 minute and 15 minute epoxies) produce water resistant, nor waterproof, bonds. I'm not aware of ANY that would withstand repeated cycles in a dishwasher, are you?
    David Walser
    Mesa, Arizona

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walser View Post
    Stan -- If you use the right epoxy, you should be fine. However, not all epoxies are waterproof. For example, SystemThree's Quick Cure (their 5 minute and 15 minute epoxies) produce water resistant, nor waterproof, bonds. I'm not aware of ANY that would withstand repeated cycles in a dishwasher, are you?
    No, I've been using T-88 on most things. Not based on any science, its just the structural epoxy I usually have in the shop. My goal is not to make items that will stand up to frequent dishwashing, just to make them last longer than they normally would, if the user ignores the instructions. My thinking is that its the heat of a dishwasher that is more likely cause of failure than the water, although the water is what ruins the appearance.
    Hobbyist

  3. #18
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    Mar 2016
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    Minnesota
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    Titebond III.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walser View Post
    ÖMy point is epoxy resins vary widely and should be chosen for their application. Ö
    Yes, thatís why I asked for specifics. Good info, thanks.

    Iíve used a lot of epoxy, various types depending on the application, but not much for wood-to-wood bonds.

  5. #20
    Im likely one of the posters who pushes either UF, Epoxy, or PU. The post that says TB original will never fail is right as long as your user treats the board with care. Same "somewhat" with TBIII but that glue is really junk. For day in and day out boards I wouldnt have a problem firing them out with TB original, II, or III, as long as they were fully disclaimed with regards to care (water, dishwasher, etc). But if your going to put any care or high quality wood into the board I'd never run PVA period. It wont hold up to anything other than the most perfectly prepared material, and tender care. Your talking a $300 board, love, and at that point use a better glue anyway.
    Last edited by Mark Bolton; 12-01-2021 at 5:53 PM.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  6. #21
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    Titebond III. Never had one fail, no matter how intricate.
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  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    No, I've been using T-88 on most things. Not based on any science, its just the structural epoxy I usually have in the shop. My goal is not to make items that will stand up to frequent dishwashing, just to make them last longer than they normally would, if the user ignores the instructions. My thinking is that its the heat of a dishwasher that is more likely cause of failure than the water, although the water is what ruins the appearance.
    Heavy water will have an issue on most PVA's though TBIII I have not tried directly. But anything below III even if you have a glue bottle with a plugged tip, just drop it in a pot of water overnight and it will be clear in the morning. Heat on all of them is the death sentence.

    I cant imagine trying to make any wood product that could withstand the dishwasher. Thats a non-warranty situation but a lot of people that use their boards heavily and wash them heavily (meat, chicken, etc) can be pretty hard on a glue up.

    I have a few personally and consider us a very heavy user though we always dry them or stand them on edge to dry and they all show their use but thats the purpose. We dont pamper them no matter what. They are not suppose to remain flawless as the day they were new and unused. They are suppose to die a good death to do over-use.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bolton View Post
    Heavy water will have an issue on most PVA's though TBIII I have not tried directly. But anything below III even if you have a glue bottle with a plugged tip, just drop it in a pot of water overnight and it will be clear in the morning. Heat on all of them is the death sentence.

    I cant imagine trying to make any wood product that could withstand the dishwasher. Thats a non-warranty situation but a lot of people that use their boards heavily and wash them heavily (meat, chicken, etc) can be pretty hard on a glue up.

    I have a few personally and consider us a very heavy user though we always dry them or stand them on edge to dry and they all show their use but thats the purpose. We dont pamper them no matter what. They are not suppose to remain flawless as the day they were new and unused. They are suppose to die a good death to do over-use.
    Mark, I have done a few of them, but they're newer. Do you think an end grain board would hold up better to the heavy duty use that you describe? I have a friend with a 1000# smoker & he does meats weekly. Would you suggest heavy duty wood or tight grain or a combination? Maybe epoxy for that kind of use?

  9. #24
    End grain will definitely outlast a edge/long grain with heavy chopping but in my mind thats chopping with a cleaver like breaking down whole animals type chopping. Heavy cleaver etc. When I say "show use" Im just talking your average cut marks, some glue joint opening here and there. Maybe some small end checks. But we, nor anyone Ive ever known on average, ever refresh/re-oil boards. They just get used.

    I cant imagine the use it would take to hollow out any board edge/long grain or end grain. Would be like all day every day for years and years and at that point you'd be better off with a cookie off a dense tree.

    I cant fathom any dense hardwood end grain cutting board NOT holding up to any modern use Ive seen with all this smoker stuff going on for a lifetime. They all likely treat their knives (sharp) better than any board they will own so there wont be much cleaver work lol.

    Cutting boards are one of the most over-thought items in the woodworking world in my opinion. Because they are a lot of work, look cool to the maker when freshly sanded/oiled, and under valued (under priced most of the time). Any old board will likely last an eternity for even the most heavy user.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  10. #25
    Mark, I'd agree about Smoker guys and blades. My buddy was SO happy when I got a Tormek. Flat stone it after to 4k...

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