Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: Bullets from the tablesaw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,066

    Bullets from the tablesaw

    When cutting off a short amount from longer stock (say cutting 1/4" off 3/8" round or square stock) the bit sometimes gets caught between the teeth and the ZCI and gets fired at the wall of the shop. The bit gets mangled. Blade is a WWII. The blade looks good and cuts smoothly. Clearance to the ZCI is about 1/32" Happens with or without a sled. Is this blade unsuited to this kind of cut?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Clearance to the ZCI is about 1/32"
    Maybe a new insert so the clearance is actually zero? Same with the sled, let in an inlay to tighten up the kerf. The blade is not an issue.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 11-28-2021 at 10:40 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    59,376
    I agree with Kevin...it's not the blade. Many folks also do these small cutoffs using a sled because they provide positive back support for the material which helps avoid the situation where the small piece rotates into the teeth as it gets to where it's released from the larger piece it's being severed from.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    Redmond, OR
    Posts
    142
    Do you have a band saw or a radial arm saw?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    6,155
    Is this blade unsuited to this kind of cut?
    Easy enough to find out.
    Just try to duplicate the problem with a different blade.

    If you can duplicate it, then it not the blade.

    If you can't, then it might be the blade - or - it might be the way that blade interacts with the whole saw/ZCI/clearance setup.

    +1 to the idea of using a sled.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    579
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I agree with Kevin...it's not the blade. Many folks also do these small cutoffs using a sled because they provide positive back support for the material which helps avoid the situation where the small piece rotates into the teeth as it gets to where it's released from the larger piece it's being severed from.
    I agree with the sled option that Jim mentions. When you make the sled, you can cut the groove in the sled with your WWII and it will work like a ZCI and of course like Jim mentions, will have the back support to push the small cutoff past the blade.
    Distraction could lead to dismemberment!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tampa Bay area
    Posts
    598
    Check with the people that do segmented lathe turning. They deal with tiny cutoffs by the hundreds. They often use a slightly elevated cutting surface with a ramp for the offcut to slide away from the spinning blade. Most likely not your blade as most segmented turners have the problem and are using a number of different blades.

  8. #8
    A miter gauge fence that extends past the blade will also work.

    An acute wedge fixed to the table with magnets can divert offcuts from the blade. You can see an offcut diverter at about 15:30 in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1OLlqB6-x8- not too useful for one very short offcut, but good for multiples dancing around near the blade.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 11-28-2021 at 11:59 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    755
    Taking 1/4” off a 3/8” round is a bit hairy, even on a band saw. Angled ramp as mentioned helps, and I’ve also rigged a dust collector fitting with coarse screen that I use at times to suck the off cuts away from the blade. For just a few pieces of dowel or pvc, i have a v-grooved board that I use with a back saw or dozuki…quicker to set up than the ramp & vac.
    Bullets is the right term, for sure!!
    earl

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    6,394
    No ZCI is truly Zero clearance. The teeth are wider than the plate of the blade so there will be a very small gap. But, Iím not sure how a 1/4Ē cutoff would cause a problem. I trim stuff like that and donít have the problem.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    846
    I use a little ramp on the bandsaw when cutting small round pieces. I use 1/4" brass rod for tone rings on banjos and cut the scraps into less than 1/4" lengths to use for fretboard dots. I cut a 45 degree slope on a piece of scrap wood and then cut into the wood so that the blade is sitting just inside the ramp. Then I clamp the piece of wood down and freehand cut the dots off the brass, and each dot rolls or falls down the ramp as soon as it's cut, out of the way of the blade. This would be a little harder to do on a tablesaw unless you used a sled with a built in ramp, it seems like that would be very handy once you got it made.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Dana, Masachusetts
    Posts
    325
    Sneak up on the cut. Trim the waste into dust. It might mean rough cutting closer to finished length, or making two passes on the sliding table. My miter saw will slam off cut triangles into the wooden fence. The extra time to nip the end saves the sweet sound of slamming scrap.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,689
    A shop vac hose mounted up close will suck those cutoffs away before it gets stuck in a tooth.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    940
    Andrew Klein recently posted a video showing a shopvac cutoff collector for this type of cut after he'd been hit in the face:
    https://youtu.be/F2J0fw_VlmM?t=421


    One issue with ZCIs is the teeth are wider than the blade body, so you will pretty much always have some gap, except at where the teeth themselves are.


    Matt

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Hills;3158056[URL="https://youtu.be/F2J0fw_VlmM?t=421"
    1[/URL]


    One issue with ZCIs is the teeth are wider than the blade body, so you will pretty much always have some gap, except at where the teeth themselves are.

    Matt
    True, but at the teeth is where any throat plate generated kickback happens. If the zci is replaced frequently and that gap kept to a minimum the risk will be minimized.

    The various ramps and shop vac solutions are certainly useful for repetitive cuts but unlikely to be set up for the occasional small offcut.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •