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Thread: What binding material for concrete rubble walls?

  1. #1
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    What binding material for concrete rubble walls?

    In building low walls out of concrete rubble for landscaping ( like the walls of a planter, not walls of a building), what is the best binding material? Should I use more concrete to bind the chunks of rubble? Should I treat it like a brick or stone wall and use mortar?

  2. #2
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    Use mortar.

  3. #3
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    The mason who did the replare and extension of the wall bordering the patio at our old property used mortar. The faces were the nice limestone rock from the old stone walls on the back of the property and he filled the inside with "whatever fit".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
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    I would dry fit, with tumblehome, to allow drainage.
    Or buy some K rail
    Bill D.

  5. #5
    Building a wall outa "concrete rubble" sounds like a creative and interesting idea. you don't say but im assuming this might be from a concrete slab and the bottom unfinished side of this "rubble" will become the decorative face side of the wall....

    I would use a mortar (type "S"). I think type s has some polymer additives to help with expansion and contraction caused by heat and cold cycles o'l Mother Nature throws at us ..so it shouldn't crack up as bad as a concrete mix.

    sounds cool, good luck with it!


  6. #6
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    Will it freeze, any water behind the wall.
    Bill D

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Will it freeze, any water behind the wall.
    Bill D
    Freezing comes into play if there are cracks in the construction or voids that can receive water. A properly constructed wall should be quite durable as long as it's maintained.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Will it freeze, any water behind the wall.
    Bill D
    I'm not thinking of building a wall for a fountain or pond. In the case of a retaining wall, there will be moisture in the soil on the high side that may seep into the wall. Of course, a retaining wall should have weep holes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Tashiro View Post
    I'm not thinking of building a wall for a fountain or pond. In the case of a retaining wall, there will be moisture in the soil on the high side that may seep into the wall. Of course, a retaining wall should have weep holes.
    Yes, if you're backfilling behind it, you can accommodate drainage into the design to insure it's handled and doesn't back up behind the wall. If water can't hang out easily, it will not affect things as much over time.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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