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Thread: Slow Roasted Turkey

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry McFadden View Post
    Forgot this important step!!

    Attachment 468675
    That's a good lookin' bird.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by George Bokros View Post
    Personally I would not go to bed with the oven on nor would I leave home with something in the oven.

    When you go to bed, do you turn off the heat and water heater? Also don't forget to unplug the fridge. It's no different than using the crock pot. The birds I cook run just a little over 20#. That's as big as my roaster will hold. Put it in around 8:30 PM, and take it out around 7:00 AM. Probably could shorten time by a couple hours, but this works with my schedule

  3. #18
    I use a meat thermometer. As soon as itís 5 degrees shy, take it out.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I use a meat thermometer. As soon as itís 5 degrees shy, take it out.

    22# turkey, put in the oven around 9:00 PM last night. Taken out this morning at 7:00 AM. Internal temp 200 degrees. Turkey wasn't completely thawed when it went into oven. Because it's "sealed" in roaster, it's nice and moist. Around 4:30 this morning, whole house smelt like Thanksgiving morning, so most likely turkey could have been cut off then.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    22# turkey, put in the oven around 9:00 PM last night. Taken out this morning at 7:00 AM. Internal temp 200 degrees. Turkey wasn't completely thawed when it went into oven. Because it's "sealed" in roaster, it's nice and moist. Around 4:30 this morning, whole house smelt like Thanksgiving morning, so most likely turkey could have been cut off then.
    Our definitions of a properly done turkey are obviously very different. While the legs & thighs will at least be edible at 200, the breast meat will be very dry & tough. Think the turkey from "Chirstmas Vacation" At that point the proteins in the muscle fibers are so denatured that no amount of gravy or fat will counteract that kind of damage. Sealing the moisture in the roaster will do nothing to prevent it from being overdone. It certainly will smell great though.

    Do an experiment. Cut a turkey breast in two & cook one half to 200 & the other to 165. You'll be amazed at the difference.

  6. #21
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    I didn't see a mention for brining the Turkey first. Once I tried that years ago I haven't turned back. So moist! Worth the extra effort.

  7. #22
    I love that everyone has their own method that they swear is the best. For my part, in 18 years, my theory is that the only that matters is moistness. Injections, sealing, slow cooking, nothing matters if you go over 165 on the breast.

    It ainít sexy, but the easiest method for me is butterflying and then cutting the legs and wings off. Salt the night before. Cook the breast to 160 and the legs to 180. Let them rest a few mins out of the oven as they come up to temp another 5 degrees. Rely on the gravy for flavor.

    No big contraptions or hulabaloo; the guests think itís magic because itís so easy.

  8. #23
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    My tip is to place the raw bird onto the lifting chain apparatus in the pan then lift and move things around until it is balanced. Do this first thing so it will be correctly balanced when it is hot.
    Then do any covering with foil etc, cook, enjoy.
    Bill D

  9. #24
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    My method is very simple and easy… Let the wife take care of it.

    It comes out fine every time. At least that is what I tell her if I want to stay happy the next few months.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I love that everyone has their own method that they swear is the best. For my part, in 18 years, my theory is that the only that matters is moistness. Injections, sealing, slow cooking, nothing matters if you go over 165 on the breast.

    It ain’t sexy, but the easiest method for me is butterflying and then cutting the legs and wings off. Salt the night before. Cook the breast to 160 and the legs to 180. Let them rest a few mins out of the oven as they come up to temp another 5 degrees. Rely on the gravy for flavor.

    No big contraptions or hulabaloo; the guests think it’s magic because it’s so easy.
    This is exactly correct. It's all about the temperature. I've tried brining, but that can result meat that is technically juicier, but it can also be kinda watery. I do give the bird a good rub with salt & let it sit a day or so in the fridge before proceeding with the seasoning & roasting.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronnie Hurst View Post
    I didn't see a mention for brining the Turkey first. Once I tried that years ago I haven't turned back. So moist! Worth the extra effort.

    Same here, +1 for brining

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    My method is very simple and easy… Let the wife take care of it.

    It comes out fine every time. At least that is what I tell her if I want to stay happy the next few months.

    jtk
    Pro move. If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  13. #28
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    That looks really really good.
    Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known
    - Carl Sagan

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    When you go to bed, do you turn off the heat and water heater? Also don't forget to unplug the fridge. It's no different than using the crock pot. The birds I cook run just a little over 20#. That's as big as my roaster will hold. Put it in around 8:30 PM, and take it out around 7:00 AM. Probably could shorten time by a couple hours, but this works with my schedule

    just this past thanksgiving had a friend put the turkey in his oven and left the room for a while (don't know how long, about 2hr's?) but when he went to check on the turkey the kitchen was very hot, the exterior of the oven very hot to the touch, and the bird well done.

    I suggested that maybe the oven door wasn't fully closed, but he's not taking a chance on a suspected wonky oven so he's bought a new one.
    Hobbyist woodworker
    Maryland

  15. #30
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    Cheapskate tip: when the little popup button pops up pull it out with gloves and push it down. then run cold water over it while holding it down until it stays down. It will work fine the next time.
    Bill D

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