Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: Used Table saw - questions

  1. #1

    Used Table saw - questions

    Hi All,

    I got a used Delta table saw from a family friend who wasn't using it anymore. I've never used a table saw so I'm a little intimidated by it so want to use it as safely as possible. I've taken some pictures and hoping the group can help answer some questions!

    1. I'm assuming the item on the back is the riving knife and then there is a blade guard attached to the riving knife?
    2. Is it safer to use the Grr-ripper for rip cuts than the blade guard (I'm assuming I can't use both or can I?)
    3. Anything additional I know or extra features I can install to help? It has a fence and basic push stick.
    4. Table saw hasn't been used in 2-3 years. Anything I should do before starting it up? I'll probably search youtube for some maintenance videos.

    Thanks!

    Luistable saw 2.jpgtable saw 1.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Mid-Michigan
    Posts
    143
    That’s the factory splitter. Works similar to a riving knife but must be removed for non-through cuts. Suggest you watch some table saw safety videos on YouTube to get yourself acquainted.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    575
    Luiis,

    First off, let's start with the fact that the table saw is the most dangerous wood working tool in the work shop. Some more pictures might help but the saw looks like it is missing the table insert (the part that goes around blade). It also looks like the blade guard at some point hit the blade so the alignment might be way off.

    1) The splitter is in the back and attached to the plastic blade guard. A riving knife looks sorta like a shark fin behind the blade when not using a blade guard (small parts, etc).
    2) Personal preference. Use the tool of choice for the specific cut being made to make it safe and keep your hands clear of the blade.
    3) Safety comes with a proper setup saw. This includes a sharp and correct blade for the cut, safety for the blade (blade guard, etc), a square fence, smooth table surface to reduce friction, proper support for larger cuts, power cords clear of feet/walking areas etc. The biggest safety item you can 'install' on your fence is thinking out each cut before doing it and make sure it will be safe, otherwise don't plug in the saw till you can make the cut safely.
    4) Depends on the saw. If it's belt driven, make sure the belt is not dry dotted, ensure your blade is perfectly flat, check the owners manual for maintenance requirements, etc. Also make sure the blade spins by hand freely to ensure any bearings are not shot. **** DO ALL OF THIS WITH WITH THE MACHINE UNPLUGGED FROM THE POWER TO ENSURE THERE IS NO WAY FOR THE SAW TO TURN ON)

    Stressing 1 more time, a pour maintained machine is dangerous.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKean, PA
    Posts
    13,869
    Until you get lots of experience leave that guard in place. Check to see if your area has a community college that offers a woodworking course and take that course. At anytime you are fearful of making a cut, stop and examine what you are doing and see if there is a safer way to do it.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Fenneuff View Post
    Thatís the factory splitter. Works similar to a riving knife but must be removed for non-through cuts. Suggest you watch some table saw safety videos on YouTube to get yourself acquainted.
    Thanks for the quick reply. Can I add a riving knife to this table saw to make it safer?
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Rapp View Post
    Luiis,

    First off, let's start with the fact that the table saw is the most dangerous wood working tool in the work shop. Some more pictures might help but the saw looks like it is missing the table insert (the part that goes around blade). It also looks like the blade guard at some point hit the blade so the alignment might be way off..

    Wow, youíve got a great eye! Iíll double check the table insert (saw is currently at my parents place) and check an online video on how to ensure alignment

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    Until you get lots of experience leave that guard in place. Check to see if your area has a community college that offers a woodworking course and take that course. At anytime you are fearful of making a cut, stop and examine what you are doing and see if there is a safer way to do it.
    This is a great idea. Iíll have to check it out and would be a good way to learn to safely use the table saw and other tools

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New Westminster BC
    Posts
    2,102
    I think Justin is mistaken, the red plate behind the blade is the insert. The table top appears to be aluminum, not cast iron. This is likely a bench top or jobsite model with a direct drive universal motor like this. I had one of these, first time I used it I decided to get rid of it. Make sure you have good hearing protection, if I'm right, it's a screamer. Please don't form an opinion about table saws based on this one, there are much better ones out there. Don't mean to be negative but hate to think you might get turned off woodworking based on your experience with this saw.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,008
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Rapp View Post
    Luiis,

    First off, let's start with the fact that the table saw is the most dangerous wood working tool in the work shop.

    Justin - I would tend to disagree. I personally feel the radial arm saw is more "dangerous" than the table saw. I own and use two table saws and one radial arm saw. I do realize that most of the radial arm saws are long gone from most of the current wood shops. I have been using mine for over 40 years, mainly for cross cut - and have not yet had an incident. (Knock on wood).
    David

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    I think Justin is mistaken, the red plate behind the blade is the insert. The table top appears to be aluminum, not cast iron. This is likely a bench top or jobsite model with a direct drive universal motor like this. I had one of these, first time I used it I decided to get rid of it. Make sure you have good hearing protection, if I'm right, it's a screamer. Please don't form an opinion about table saws based on this one, there are much better ones out there. Don't mean to be negative but hate to think you might get turned off woodworking based on your experience with this saw.
    This looks like the one we got! I didnít notice if it said bench saw on it so Iíll have to double check next time I go over.

    I really prefer to be safe than cheap. Am I better off buying a basic ryobi table saw than using this? Iím just starting off with woodworking so donít have specific projects in mind yet besides perhaps doing some picture frames and perhaps some wood shop furniture. Try a chess board or cutting board too.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    9
    Any of the circular saws (table saw, radial arm saw, miter saw, circular saw) are all very capable of causing serious injury, they almost effortlessly cut through large pieces of wood, so can easily take a finger, hand or arm in a second. Not even worth debating "most" dangerous, just be aware that they are just waiting for you to be inattentive. All can also be used very safely with appropriate care, I've been using power tools for wood working from a young age and still have all of my fingers and toes (well 99.8% of my fingers anyway, there was that little altercation with a table saw in 9th grade).

    For some reason I can't see the pictures of the saw in question, so I'll leave issues of the condition of that particular specimen to other to comment on, but if it is similar to the Delta that Doug posted, there is nothing inherently wrong with this type of saw. I have two similar Craftsman saws. One aluminum tabled saw I bought new in the early 2000s and an older cast iron tabled saw from the 70s or 80s which I recently acquired and am getting into shape.

    This class of saw is not as useful as a bigger cabinet type table saw, but also fairly inexpensive, and portable, a cabinet saw is neither of these things. Within their limitations they can do good work. No I would not suggest buying another of this class of saw unless somebody identifies some specific safety issues with the particular saw you have been given. A table saw can be tremendously useful but it all depends on the kind of work you want to do. Personally, I use my miter saw 2x as often as my circular saw and probably use the circular saw 2x as often as the table saw. Table saw is invaluable for some kinds of cutting, so even though it isn't used often, I wouldn't be without one.

    It really can not be overstated that power saws require your 100% full attention and respect. The 99.8% of my fingers comment was serious and entirely due to a lack of respect for just what a table saw can do to a body part, nipping off a piece of a push stick would have been well worth the extra 2 seconds it would have taken to use. Not meaning to be scary, just make sure you always respect what a table saw can do to any body part that contacts the blade.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,008
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Woods View Post
    Any of the circular saws (table saw, radial arm saw, miter saw, circular saw) are all very capable of causing serious injury, they almost effortlessly cut through large pieces of wood, so can easily take a finger, hand or arm in a second. Not even worth debating "most" dangerous, just be aware that they are just waiting for you to be inattentive. All can also be used very safely with appropriate care, I've been using power tools for wood working from a young age and still have all of my fingers and toes (well 99.8% of my fingers anyway, there was that little altercation with a table saw in 9th grade).

    For some reason I can't see the pictures of the saw in question, so I'll leave issues of the condition of that particular specimen to other to comment on, but if it is similar to the Delta that Doug posted, there is nothing inherently wrong with this type of saw. I have two similar Craftsman saws. One aluminum tabled saw I bought new in the early 2000s and an older cast iron tabled saw from the 70s or 80s which I recently acquired and am getting into shape.

    This class of saw is not as useful as a bigger cabinet type table saw, but also fairly inexpensive, and portable, a cabinet saw is neither of these things. Within their limitations they can do good work. No I would not suggest buying another of this class of saw unless somebody identifies some specific safety issues with the particular saw you have been given. A table saw can be tremendously useful but it all depends on the kind of work you want to do. Personally, I use my miter saw 2x as often as my circular saw and probably use the circular saw 2x as often as the table saw. Table saw is invaluable for some kinds of cutting, so even though it isn't used often, I wouldn't be without one.

    It really can not be overstated that power saws require your 100% full attention and respect. The 99.8% of my fingers comment was serious and entirely due to a lack of respect for just what a table saw can do to a body part, nipping off a piece of a push stick would have been well worth the extra 2 seconds it would have taken to use. Not meaning to be scary, just make sure you always respect what a table saw can do to any body part that contacts the blade.

    I believe you need to become a Contributor to see photos. Cost is about $6 per year. Many members here have gravitated towards the Saw Stop for just the reasons you mention.
    David

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    Redmond, OR
    Posts
    137
    0) You should NEVER have any part of your hand directly in line with the rotating blade. If you respect the cut line of the blade you will greatly reduce the possibility of a disfiguring injury.
    1) The saw should be solid with no chance to tip or shift. If it is a bench top saw screw it down or clamp it to a heavy work bench. An unstable saw if VERY dangerous.
    2) The saw needs to be in alignment to cut well and not be dangerous. The blade should be parallel to the miter slot and the fence should be parallel to the miter slot and blade. A saw that isn't well aligned will pinch and kick back. Proper alignment is almost more important than having the proper guards in place.
    3) The splitter is just a tall riving knife. A riving knife can be used when you only want to cut half way through the thickness of a board. There is no reason to change your splitter out to a riving knife. Your splitter will offer considerably more protection than a riving knife with the kick back culls in place on the splitter.
    4) Leave the guards in place. At the very least leave them in place while you are getting accustomed to the saw.
    5) If the distance between the blade and the fence is less than 3 inches I will always use a push stick or push block.
    6) You should push the board being cut all the way through the blade with the push stick and then some. Injuries happen when your cut piece is too close to the blade and you go to pick them up while the blade is still spinning.
    7) Have support setup to support your cut pieces after they go through the blade (an outfeed table). If you let gravity have its way and a cut board flips up after part of it goes off the back of the saw table you have a good potential for an accident.
    8) Safety glasses! Table saws do have a tendency to kick splinters into your face which can lead to further cascading problems with the cut.
    9) Hearing protection.
    10) A dull blade will not cut well which will lead to further problems and safety concerns. Get a quality sharp blade. The original blade on the saw will probably be dull by now and not the sharpest to begin with. I use freud blades when I need a very high wuality finished cut. I have actually had good luck with Harbor Freight blades and tend to use them on coarser cuts to preserve my expensive blades.
    11) Use the right blade for the job. Don't try ripping with a cross cut blade it will not cut well which can be dangerous. Combination (cross cut / rip) blades are the preferred blade for many because they do both types of cuts well.
    12) Never stand being the board being cut. Kick backs are very dangerous. If you are cutting a wide panel never stand behind the piece that is between the fence and the blade.
    13) Have a clean clear workspace around your saw. You don't want to be slipping or tripping on stuff while you are cutting.
    14) Tell your family that they should never approach you while you are in the middle of the cut. If they need something they should wait patiently until you have finished your current cut.
    15) If a particular cut you are about to make makes you nervous step back, think about the cut and find a better way to make the cut. If you aren't sure how to perform the cut carefully come here for some group think on how to perform the cut safely.
    16) The possibility of an accident in the shop goes up exponentially in relation to how tired you are. If you find yourself tired take a break or call it a night.
    17) Alcohol and table saws use DO NOT MIX! This is a good way to loose an appendage.
    18) I am almost always in my shop by myself. I always make sure to have my cell phone on me while working in the shop so I can call for help if I need to.
    From Eric: 19) adjust the blade height so it just clears the top of material being cut.

    This list is not in order of importance but in the order I thought about them. I am sure there are more.

    Table saws aren't inheritantly dangerous... the people using them are! Develop safe habits from the start and your table saw will be a valued and useful tool.
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 11-22-2021 at 7:56 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,008
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Schuch View Post
    0) You should NEVER have any part of your hand directly in line with the rotating blade. If you respect the cut line of the blade you will greatly reduce the possibility of a disfiguring injury.
    1) The saw should be solid with no chance to tip or shift. If it is a bench top saw screw it down or clamp it to a heavy work bench. An unstable saw if VERY dangerous.
    2) The saw needs to be in alignment to cut well and not be dangerous. The blade should be parallel to the miter slot and the fence should be parallel to the miter slot and blade. A saw that isn't well aligned will pinch and kick back. Proper alignment is almost more important than having the proper guards in place.
    3) The splitter is just a tall riving knife. A riving knife can be used when you only want to cut half way through the thickness of a board. There is no reason to change your splitter out with a riving knife. You splitter will offer considerably more protection than a riving knife with the kick back culls in place on the splitter.
    4) Leave the guards in place while you are getting accustomed to the saw.
    5) If the distance between the blade and the fence is less than 3 inches I will always use a push stick or push block.
    6) You should push the board being cut all the way through the blade with the push stick and then some. Injuries happen when your cut piece is too close to the blade and you go to pick them up while the blade is still spinning.
    7) Have support setup to support your cut pieces after they go through the blade (an outfeed table). If you let gravity have its way and a cut board flips up after part of it goes off the back of the saw table you have a good potential for an accident.
    8) Safety glasses! Table saws do have a tendency to kick splinters into your face which can lead to further cascading problems with the cut.
    9) Hearing protection.

    This list is not in order of importance but in the order I thought about them. I am sure there are more.

    These are all great suggestions! Thanks for sharing your list.
    David

  13. #13
    Michaelís list is very comprehensive.
    Only thing I would add is adjust the blade height so it just clears the top of material being cut.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
    Posts
    1,902
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Justin - I would tend to disagree. I personally feel the radial arm saw is more "dangerous" than the table saw. I own and use two table saws and one radial arm saw. I do realize that most of the radial arm saws are long gone from most of the current wood shops. I have been using mine for over 40 years, mainly for cross cut - and have not yet had an incident. (Knock on wood).
    David
    I also still have and use my Dewalt radial arm saw. Just used it last night in fact. I don't consider it any more dangerous than the table saw if one respects it. If you don't respect any woodworking tool they can cause injury. Pay attention to what you are doing and where your hands are placed. As for the table saw that started the discussion I agree with the previous comments. This saw is very limited in it's abilities and may disappoint you. The one thing will almost assuredly do is make you appreciate better units.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    835
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Wayne View Post
    Michaelís list is very comprehensive.
    Only thing I would add is adjust the blade height so it just clears the top of material being cut.
    That's what I do too, just have the blade higher than the wood, but a lot of people on this site say that the blade should be all the way up to reduce kickback potential. That idea seems bizarre and dangerous to me, and it makes rougher cuts at a slower speed, but everyone has their own ideas.

    To the OP: I started out with an off-brand saw of that type, and it was not great but it was handy for some carpentry type work and I got my money's worth ($30) out of it before I got a bigger saw.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •