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Thread: Garage door insulation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    MA
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    Garage door insulation

    My new shop is a two car garage. With neighbors.

    I have seen garage door insulation kits for sale

    Have seen a handful of DIY versions

    I would like a combination of thermal insulation and noise suppression.

    Anyone have experiences they would like to share?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
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    Portland, OR
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    I've looked into this a decent bit. There's a bunch of youtube videos debating whether it really works or not, and if it's worth the money. For me, the answer is yes. Even if there isn't a huge increase in insulation, I'll take what I can get.

    For noise: I insulated the entire shop with rockwool. I found the noise coming through the doors was very minimal at that point. So little in fact that noone ever complained. To finish the doors, I would like to do rockwool again, but will have to decide on either 1/4" panels to hold it up, or possibly a fabric of some sort. I'm hesitant because: I threw a few old rigid foam panels up in it to test it out last summer. While it did reflect the heat nicely, it also added weight to the doors. My doors aren't powered, and it's an obvious difference in weight with just the panels. So, I have a mild concern about the doors becoming harder to open and easier to accidentally slam shut.

  3. #3
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    May 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Hall View Post
    I've looked into this a decent bit. There's a bunch of youtube videos debating whether it really works or not, and if it's worth the money. For me, the answer is yes. Even if there isn't a huge increase in insulation, I'll take what I can get.

    For noise: I insulated the entire shop with rockwool. I found the noise coming through the doors was very minimal at that point. So little in fact that noone ever complained. To finish the doors, I would like to do rockwool again, but will have to decide on either 1/4" panels to hold it up, or possibly a fabric of some sort. I'm hesitant because: I threw a few old rigid foam panels up in it to test it out last summer. While it did reflect the heat nicely, it also added weight to the doors. My doors aren't powered, and it's an obvious difference in weight with just the panels. So, I have a mild concern about the doors becoming harder to open and easier to accidentally slam shut.
    Need to adjust spring tension after adding anything to garage door. Adjusted properly the door will go up and down easily and safely. Might be a good time to have the springs replaced and one added if only one there now.
    Ron

  4. #4
    I did mine myself, not a kit.
    I just bought the R-tech rigid foam the proper thickness and cut to fit. After I did what I could with the foam and some Tyvek tape to seal the joints, I used expanding foam in a can to fill the voids I could not reach. Where I live and the orientation of my door, it has helped a tremendous amount. I recommend doing it.
    I also installed a door jamb weather seal all around the outside which helps quite a lot.

    With my door, the spring tension wasn't an issue, also the entire added weight is probably just a couple of pounds at most, it's all foam.
    img_3725.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    I've done it, it was a pretty quick and simple project, so why not.

    Fair warning, a garage door can only be so good, because the stop molding around it is usually pretty leaking. So going from like R0 to R6-10 might be decent, but don't worry about much more than that.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    .

    Fair warning, a garage door can only be so good, because the stop molding around it is usually pretty leaking.
    This is something I'm paying attention to "as we speak", kinda, sorta. There is a very good, high quality insulated door on our gara...err...temporary shop. But the seals are aged and I need to replace them to eliminate a lot more of the infiltration that comes around the door. They do get less effective over time as they stiffen up and no longer stay in full contact with the door. I'm already looking at options.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Lebanon, TN
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    I've insulated three metal garage doors with 3 different materials, not for sound deadening, but more for heat.

    In Dallas, I had a 4 car garage with two double uninsulated metal doors that faced due south.

    In the middle of summer, these doors would radiate the heat into the garage and raise the inside temperatures 10 to 25 degrees higher than the hot summer temps outside.

    I could get surface temperature readings, off the inside of the doors, north of 140F.

    After the insulation, the garage remained noticeably cooler and the temp readings, off the insulation, were more like 85F on a 100F degree day outside.

    I used solid foam on one door, kind of of an aluminum foil bubble on another and now I have a rock wool fiber glass type on my current doors, this latest door I bought a kit from HD.

  8. #8
    The biggest improvement on my doors, after insulation, has been a threshold seal along the bottom. It’s glued to the concrete and has done a really good job of keeping water and dirt from under the doors.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    But the seals are aged and I need to replace them to eliminate a lot more of the infiltration that comes around the door. They do get less effective over time as they stiffen up and no longer stay in full contact with the door. I'm already looking at options.
    Even with brand new seals I don't think you're going to get very good performance. In my case I've got so much play in the door in and out that a good seal is hard to achieve. I've done a lot of looking around, but I've come to the conclusion that the system is fundamentally flawed, and that you're only going to get so much performance from a sliding door.

    I'd be curious to see what solutions you come up with.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weber View Post
    I did mine myself, not a kit.
    I just bought the R-tech rigid foam the proper thickness and cut to fit. After I did what I could with the foam and some Tyvek tape to seal the joints, I used expanding foam in a can to fill the voids I could not reach. Where I live and the orientation of my door, it has helped a tremendous amount. I recommend doing it.

    img_3725.jpg
    I would be concerned about exposed foamboard in case of fire.
    https://inspectapedia.com/Energy/Foa...ng%20building.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    Even with brand new seals I don't think you're going to get very good performance. In my case I've got so much play in the door in and out that a good seal is hard to achieve. I've done a lot of looking around, but I've come to the conclusion that the system is fundamentally flawed, and that you're only going to get so much performance from a sliding door.

    I'd be curious to see what solutions you come up with.
    Fortunately, the insulated door on this new to us house is "high end" and I had it adjusted when the new opener was installed. It's really solid when down with pretty much zero play for movement. (and nearly silent when opening/closing) The seals, however, are old and stiff and don't engage the physical door as well as they need to which is why I intend to replacement. I need to do both the perimeter seals on the outside and put a new bottom seal on as that's degraded from age as well.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    Mar 2013
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    Trenton SC, in the CSRA
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    Matt Risinger did a video on the Build Show channel and demo'd a rail system that included a small cant in the vertical run of the rails. The cant supposedly move the door closer to the frame forcing a tighter seal. Don't know about the longevity issues, etc. I don't remember the name. FWIW, Risinger is a high end GC in Texas in case you haven't heard of him. Does a lot of high efficiency stuff.

  13. #13
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    I saw that video, Eugene. I'm betting what he showed will be top notch because it was ... at his personal home. (His family is moving in next week actually)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Eugene Dixon View Post
    Matt Risinger did a video on the Build Show channel and demo'd a rail system that included a small cant in the vertical run of the rails. The cant supposedly move the door closer to the frame forcing a tighter seal. Don't know about the longevity issues, etc. I don't remember the name. FWIW, Risinger is a high end GC in Texas in case you haven't heard of him. Does a lot of high efficiency stuff.

    I've seen that video, and yet my garage door came with specific instructions to not modify the tracks, or it would void the warranty, people would die, the sky would become like sackcloth, blood would flow in the streets. Probably be okay, I mean it's just a metal track, not nuclear launch codes, but even still I don't think it's a very good solution, since you've still got some "slop" in the door.

    @Jim - Actually that was at another house, and he did not install them on the one he's been working on recently for his own personal use. Since he seems to go all out, and be very serious about air gaps I took it as a sign that the tracks might not be all they're cracked up to be.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    @Jim - Actually that was at another house, and he did not install them on the one he's been working on recently for his own personal use. Since he seems to go all out, and be very serious about air gaps I took it as a sign that the tracks might not be all they're cracked up to be.
    Did he do it on the house before deciding to rip it down and build the new one on the same slab/footprint? The recent video snippets that were in the garage had the same finishing and so forth that I (seem) to remember from the garage door video. But I could be misremembering... No matter. It was still an interesting method.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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