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Thread: protecting outdoor wood furniture

  1. #16
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    LOL, everyone on YouTube is an expert. Everything is easy and everything they say comes from hours, days, or weeks, but almost never years, of experience. Thank goodness our medical professionals don't get their training via YouTube. Today, wannabe doctors, we're going to do open heart surgery. Piece of cake.

    If you decide to use paint I would just use the fir. If you keep up with the maintenance it will last a long time. If you would rather avoid maintenance altogether beyond occasional cleaning go with the redwood or even PT. Both will last a really long time.

    John

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    LOL, everyone on YouTube is an expert. Everything is easy and everything they say comes from hours, days, or weeks, but almost never years, of experience. Thank goodness our medical professionals don't get their training via YouTube. Today, wannabe doctors, we're going to do open heart surgery. Piece of cake.

    If you decide to use paint I would just use the fir. If you keep up with the maintenance it will last a long time. If you would rather avoid maintenance altogether beyond occasional cleaning go with the redwood or even PT. Both will last a really long time.

    John
    Thanks for the suggestion John.

    Typically, I learn the basics on YouTube and seek more advance tips in forums like this one. Video creators are from all levels. It ranges from professional woodworkers with 30+ years experience to home owners showing off their first projects. Unfortunately, most videos are focused on the "making" part and skim over the rest. By making, I mean the milling, cutting, joinery, assembly, etc. Sanding and finishing are considered as boring thus barely addressed in the videos although that is super important to achieve a good appearance. I also realized they don't show the "hiccups". Everything always line up perfectly on the first assembly.

    I was hoping to achieve this kind of look, but I wasn't sure how difficult is it to maintain over the long run. That said, ease of maintenance is more important me than look.

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/620300548671664255/

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by joe webb View Post
    Thank you everyone for all these very valuable tips. I watch lots of YouTube videos and they almost never talk about the maintenance part.

    So it sounds like paint is the more durable option and also easier to strip and recoat.
    At my local big orange store, a 2x4x8 fir is $4 while redwood is $18. I wasn't sure how much longer redwood would last.

    I was also wondering if using a product like Thompson Water Sealer would help slow down the impact of humidity.

    Thank you again

    I would advise against buying Redwood at a big box store
    Example from my redwood supplier
    2x4x8' Pressure Treated FIR Rails
    $6.75 ea

    2x4x8' PREMIUM Redwood Rails
    $10.78 ea

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe webb View Post
    Thanks for the suggestion John.

    Typically, I learn the basics on YouTube and seek more advance tips in forums like this one. Video creators are from all levels. It ranges from professional woodworkers with 30+ years experience to home owners showing off their first projects. Unfortunately, most videos are focused on the "making" part and skim over the rest. By making, I mean the milling, cutting, joinery, assembly, etc. Sanding and finishing are considered as boring thus barely addressed in the videos although that is super important to achieve a good appearance. I also realized they don't show the "hiccups". Everything always line up perfectly on the first assembly.

    I was hoping to achieve this kind of look, but I wasn't sure how difficult is it to maintain over the long run. That said, ease of maintenance is more important me than look.

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/620300548671664255/

    I'm not sure but it looks like there is clearcoat on the benches. We've been through all that entails to keep looking good - unless you keep them covered. If you put covers over them when you aren't using them clearcoat will last for many years. The sun (UV) is the enemy. Eliminate the sun and you've stopped 90% of what can go wrong. Keep the feet dry, too, and you've taken care of most potential routes for degrade.

    If you plan to use construction lumber be aware that it's no better than 19% moisture content when it leaves the factory. You might see KD19 stamped on it. It might be lower when you buy it but it likely won't be completely air dried which is the best option for outdoor furniture. So if you go that route put it in a shed or open garage until it equalizes with the environment before you finish it. l

    John

  5. #20
    John, you've used Cetol on doors, haven't you? Any reason not to use it on outdoor furniture?
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 11-12-2021 at 3:24 PM.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    John, you've used Cetol on door, haven't you? Any reason not to use it on outdoor furniture?
    Sikkens Cetol is now sold in the USA as the PPG Prolux brand.

  7. #22
    Typically, I learn the basics on YouTube and seek more advance tips in forums like this one. Video creators are from all levels. It ranges from professional woodworkers with 30+ years experience to home owners showing off their first projects.

    That can work if you can tell the two groups apart. "It ain't what you don't know that can hurt you, it's what you think you know that ain't so."

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    John, you've used Cetol on doors, haven't you? Any reason not to use it on outdoor furniture?
    Hi Kevin. Yes, I've used Cetol Door and Window finish on exterior doors and it's great for that application. I doubt it would do nearly as well on outdoor furniture however. It's a little soft and easily scratched. And horizontal applications are far worse than vertical. I'm not sure which Cetol product would be best for a furniture application. For the outdoor bench I built earlier this year I chose a product called "One Time", which is a UV reactive 100% solids product. I haven't seen the bench since I sold it but the test patch I used it on on my Ipe' deck is looking good so far. If it makes it through the Winter w/o damage I'll call it the best product yet for my deck.

    John

  9. #24
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    Apr 2017
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    Clarks Summit PA
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    Made several outdoor chairs out of 100% heartwood cherry ( which some say is weather resistant ) Used General Finishes outdoor oil. After application they look beautiful. After a couple months of summer sun, they faded really fast. I have reapplied the oil a couple of times to the chairs with the northern exposure. It helps, but at a certain point I will probably let them go grey. My wife won't let me cover them. The sun is tough on outdoor wood furniture.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    LOL, everyone on YouTube is an expert. Everything is easy and everything they say comes from hours, days, or weeks, but almost never years, of experience. Thank goodness our medical professionals don't get their training via YouTube. Today, wannabe doctors, we're going to do open heart surgery. Piece of cake.

    John
    Yeah, but patients get their information from Dr. Google. Sigh...
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR
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    225
    Quote Originally Posted by joe webb View Post
    Hi all,

    I am planning on building sitting benches and a table for my backyard. Probably from framing lumber (e.g. 2x4).

    I am looking for a finish that is easy to maintain. I have used exterior paint previously but they crack and peel after a couple of years. Scrapping the paint and repainting is a lots work. What are other options?
    Look is secondary and I am not a big fan of paint as it covers the wood grain.

    Typically, would cedar and redwood last much longer than fir? The cost difference is quite big.

    I live in northern California. We have hot summers, but winters are mild, and humidity is low. Thus outdoor furniture will have lots of sun exposure and occasional rains.



    Thanks much
    I would not use fir.

    Osmo outdoor coating is easy to maintain and looks nice on cedar or redwood.

  12. I have had good luck with Cabot Australian Timber Oil which I have used on my outdoor planters.
    It provides good protection in wet conditions. In my experience it's more durable than spar varnish.
    I wish I had used it on my deck when it was new. A friend used it on top of his boat dock and seems happy with it.
    Follow directions and don't over-apply so that it puddles. Main down side is slow dry time. Needs 1-2 days between coats.
    I would do at least 3 coats initially and renew every 2-3 years with 1-2 coats.
    planter.jpg

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