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Thread: Sandpaper Recommendations

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Lebanon, TN
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    Sandpaper Recommendations

    I have about 80 parts, for Christmas presents, that will require hand sanding due to some contour areas.

    I have a couple of different types of Kingspor foam backed sandpaper in various grades.

    I'm mostly trying to remove burn marks from routing on Walnut, Maple and Cherry.

    The Kingspor foam pad (it's not really paper) worked well on the contours, but has minimal cutting power and goes from 120 grit to the equivalent of 400 grit in very few passes.

    I may have the wrong Kingspor stuff for the job I'm trying to do.

    So as my title says, I'm looking for recommendations.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Peoria, IL
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    2,576
    Profile sanding tadpoles with adhesive backed sandpaper. https://www.amazon.com/Profile-Conto...a-788153578052

  3. #3
    With those hard cabinet woods I would use sharp cabinet scrapers before the sandpaper.

  4. #4
    Start with not burning the wood- sharp bits, proper balance between rpm's and feed speed, no dwelling in the cut. Burns go deep, so start removing them with a sharp scraper as Mel said, then to 120-150# paper. If a profile, use sticky back paper on a reverse-profiled block which can be made of foam board or wood plus Bondo. I use Klingspor without any problems, but 3M, Mirka, Norton are some others to try. Change out the paper like someone else is paying for it and you will be done sooner.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    In addition to the above, about the scrapers and avoiding burns, I like Indasa sandpaper. I use Rhyno Dry, not Rhyno Wet. The name says the difference. They make different applications too. RO sandpaper etc. IMO they last the longest, and they cut well. The very most important feature they have is the grit consistency. The grit on the paper is very "smooth". I've used papers that have a big grit here and there and that leaves scratches on the surfaces.

  6. #6
    Another vote for Indasa Rhyno. For contoured parts I have come to really like the Rhyno sanding sponges too. I order from Industrial Abrasives.

  7. #7
    big grit is a trick one company used to do so you think their stuff sands faster. I would not judge any paper or how it lasts unless that was tested on production work. Years ago doing some reocurring work it became clear that a top company had changed their paper. I knew exactly what the paper could do based on when it was changed and how many parts, all of a sudden it was nearly half. Got in touch they admitted they had changed some stuff up and sent me a ton of new paper to keep me quiet. So I am telling you about it now

    Photo of what is being sanded would make sense.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Lebanon, TN
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    Sanding these, mainly around the handle area.




  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Holy Tray Handles, Batman! (Those are going to be very nice!)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
    That is an unacceptable amount of burning. Bad machining leads to excessive sanding, especially on those endgrain inside corners. It looks like your pattern bit was dull. I would back up and try again with sharp tooling , lower rpms/faster feed rate. A small balloon sander might be a worthwhile investment.

  11. #11
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    Lebanon, TN
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    True, but that was a lot of effort to cut those. The initial profile was cut using my Shaper Origin CNC.

    The burning occurred mostly, I think, from the bearing on the 3/8" round over bit.

    My fault, probably should have bought a new bit with bearing.

    I didn't think the burn marks would be that difficult to sand out.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    I've never used one but it's on my list of "to get" items but what about a sanding mop? Maybe put it in a drill press and hold the parts so you have good control of the sanding process? Maybe a balloon sander with a low pressure so it'll form around the contour of the handle?
    Last edited by Alex Zeller; 10-28-2021 at 2:52 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    My favorites are Klingspor Gold and Indasa Rhyno (wet and dry)

    I do also recommend grinding a hand scraper to fit the contour if you can't find one from a kit of small scrapers. Some of the smaller ones here are from a sets, some I've ground to special shapes. (I have many more) As someone mentioned, use these before sanding. This can save a LOT of time and do a better job. The scrapers have to be sharpened properly.

    scrapers_.jpg

    When I sand curved things with coarser paper (400 and coarser) I back the sandpaper up with a flexible "soft sanding block". I use a white Magic Rub eraser or equivalent (bought 4 for $1 at the Dollar store):

    sanding_soft_block.jpg

    I use the erasers whole with gentle curves but have carved the edges as needed for tighter recesses.

    JKJ

  14. #14
    Those inside corners are difficult. If you have access to a spindle sander start there, then a soft balloon sander or sanding star/mop for the roundovers would be the fastest method, but will take some care to maintain the contours.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Quorn United Kingdom
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    639
    A possible approach for the future could be to use an older router bit for the initial milling cuts then place an identical new bit in the router and make a final light pass to reduce the appearance of milling marks

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