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Thread: Plane till prototype

  1. #1
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    Plane till prototype

    Here's a quick and dirty plane till I smacked together with some scraps.

    IMG_4892.jpg

    Goal was just to get the hand planes off the workbench. Back leans back 20-degrees and rare earth magnets give it some extra stick. It hangs from a french cleat.

    I'd like to make something better. Perhaps something with a drawer or drawers for assorted plane tools & accessories (extra blades, wax, brass hammer, etc). Anybody have a better idea?

    Jason White

  2. #2
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    hmmm, maybe...
    Planes, today, plane til.JPG
    Then close the doors when you are done...
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  3. #3
    I built this over 20 years ago and it works fine.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Dave Anderson
    Chester Toolworks LLC
    Chester, NH

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Anderson NH View Post
    I built this over 20 years ago and it works fine.
    Oh Dave that's a beauty! How about some workshop pics? Got a feeling tour around your shop would be support helpful and interesting.

    Cheers, Mike

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason White View Post
    Here's a quick and dirty plane till I smacked together with some scraps.

    IMG_4892.jpg

    Goal was just to get the hand planes off the workbench. Back leans back 20-degrees and rare earth magnets give it some extra stick. It hangs from a french cleat.

    I'd like to make something better. Perhaps something with a drawer or drawers for assorted plane tools & accessories (extra blades, wax, brass hammer, etc). Anybody have a better idea?

    Jason White
    Jason, thanks for posting your pics. IMHO tills are great way to store hand planes and make them readily accessible. I'm sure you will enjoy using yours.

  6. #6
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    Both Dave’s Saw till and plane till inspired my tool cabinet build a few years back. I hinged the plane till using dowels so that I could store rarely used items behind the big bench planes deck.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
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    Minnesota
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    Looks great! I think I'll steal your idea because I need to store my growing collection of chisels, too. Thanks for posting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe A Faulkner View Post
    Both Dave’s Saw till and plane till inspired my tool cabinet build a few years back. I hinged the plane till using dowels so that I could store rarely used items behind the big bench planes deck.

  8. #8
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    Looks wonderful. What are the knobs for?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Anderson NH View Post
    I built this over 20 years ago and it works fine.

  9. #9
    The knobs are for lifting the hinged sloped lids which hold the larger planes and spokeshaves. The attached picture taken during construction should make it clearer.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Dave Anderson
    Chester Toolworks LLC
    Chester, NH

  10. #10
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    A better view, with the dust-proof doors closed up?
    The Plane Til.JPG
    Though there are a few with their own box to sit in....That wood bodied Jointer up on top...is 20" long.
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  11. #11
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    Central Pa.
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    Keeping it very simple..just got an old dressefr from marketplace and I'm gonna use that for planes. (lay them on their sides).
    What would be a good inexpensive dessicant for the draweers?

    Keyboard is shot.

  12. #12
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    Jul 2014
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    Edmond, Oklahoma
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    Folks,

    Nice tills, every one of them, and I like them all! Dave's has a beautiful display and very quick access to the planes. The workmanship on all of them is very nice. For myself, I hope to build one, but it will be closed to keep dust out, as I am always concerned about rusting. I don't know whether I want a glass front like Stevens where I can see the planes, or nice wooden doors like the one Joe built.

    Stew

  13. #13
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    Richard,

    A dresser will keep dust, especially wood dust, out, which is highly desirable to me, as that is a big part of the battle to protect steel tools from rusting.

    However, a dresser will allow for relatively a lot of air movement, and as such, any reasonable amount of desiccant will be quickly expended.

    Based on long experience with desiccants, one thing that is clear is that any desiccant that is exposed to much air exchange in and out of a cabinet will very quickly be expended. By that I mean that it might be as short as only a few days in a dry climate like western Kansas where I went to college and graduate school, or like the Texas panhandle where I did applied research in chemistry for over 30 years. In a much more humid climate like the east coast area, the desiccant will not last long. A tool till that closes fairly tightly will do a little better, but even such will still have relatively a lot of air movement in and out of the cabinet. This compared to desiccation cabinets that I have used.

    I have spent 50 years in laboratories using desiccants that run from being so strong that they will react explosively with water to those that have only moderate capacity. In graduate school I used a glove box costing several thousand dollars in my research, the goal of which was to keep oxygen and moisture from the air out of my chemical reagents. It was a high quality glove box, and had very high quality seals. This type of glove box is specifically designed to be able to protect the material inside the box from gasses that are in the air. At work used a cheap one ($1500) to keep moisture out of test samples of a very special product the plant made, and kept a continuous purge of extremely dry nitrogen going into the glove box to keep moisture out. Beyond this I did a lot of other work with desiccants and dessicators and desiccation cabinets....so been there, done that.

    Thus, from a practical viewpoint, I know a lot about trying to keep stuff protected from even tiny amounts of moisture. Because of that experience, I would recommend that you use protective oil, wax, or some other way to protect the planes from rusting instead of desiccators in the chest. One other approach folks have mentioned on this site is a very small heat source in a cabinet type of till to keep things slightly warm so that moisture will not condense on things.

    Still, the chest will still keep the wood dust off the planes, and that, from a practical viewpoint, is really all just about any till will do. So from that perspective, the chest of drawers is as good as the tills shown above. It also was probably quick to have, versus a lot of time building something, and probably relatively inexpensive.......both things I like a lot.

    Sorry I can't give you a more encouraging report on desiccants, but long experience does not allow me to do so.

    Regards,

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 10-27-2021 at 11:05 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason White View Post
    Here's a quick and dirty plane till I smacked together with some scraps.

    IMG_4892.jpg

    Jason White
    Jason, Good start but I see a lot of wasted volume there. A little revision would move it at least 3" closer to the wall. And hinging the front would provide access to some space behind. You might want to add air shocks from an SUV to help lift.

  15. #15
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    Stew, can we benefit a little more from your gray beard?

    My basement shop has never had any rust problems. Not now with the house air conditioned and not in the several years when we had no A/C. How is that possible and what adaptations can others attempt?

    The shop is in a very dry basement in a normal house on a well drained lot with partial shade. The house is fairly tight but enough air still manages to leak in that the appliances and people do not suffer from a lack of oxygen. This puzzles me.

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