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Thread: Wine bottle display

  1. #1
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    Wine bottle display

    This is a display for a few wine bottles. It is bent-laminated plywood. The plywood is five layers, and is about 1/4" thick. The face veneers and edgebanding are African Mahogany.

    winewave.jpg

  2. #2
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    That is really awesome, Jamie!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Very nice! Process??
    Jim

  4. #4
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    I like it a lot. Beautiful curves and I love how it narrows toward one end. That's a pretty piece of veneer too. Very elegant.

  5. #5
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    Jim brings up a good point/question...it would be nice if you could do a process explanation in your copious free time. I see a lot of interesting possibilities for this kind of thing for woodworkers who want to do something beyond what they've already accomplished.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
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    Very nicely done Jamie!
    Ken

  7. #7
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    Just looking for Bird's eye view of how you did it.......Steam bending, vacuum bag with form, etc.??

  8. #8
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    Like I said in my original post, it is bent-laminated plywood. To laminate thin laminated into plywood, I slather the laminates with glue, and squeeze them together in a vacuum press until the glue cures. In plywood, the grain direction of the laminates alternate between the long direction on display and the short direction. To make bent plywood, I make a bending form which holds the laminate stack in the bent position while the glue cures. The bending form can be inside the vacuum bag or outside. In this case, the bending form was outside. The vacuum bag was a custom one I made which was large enough to contain the laminates, and small enough to fit inside the bending form. The bending form looked somewhat like a ladder; the laminate stack weaved through the ladder, going over one rung, and under the next, etc.

  9. #9
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    And that is why I wanted to know.......sounds like a fascinating process. Thanks for the reply. The form is exceptional!!

    Jim

  10. #10
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    Great looking custom piece of work. Nicely done!!!

  11. #11
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    Elegant, graceful and deceptively simple. I love it.

    Michael

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    Like I said in my original post, it is bent-laminated plywood. To laminate thin laminated into plywood, I slather the laminates with glue, and squeeze them together in a vacuum press until the glue cures. In plywood, the grain direction of the laminates alternate between the long direction on display and the short direction. To make bent plywood, I make a bending form which holds the laminate stack in the bent position while the glue cures. The bending form can be inside the vacuum bag or outside. In this case, the bending form was outside. The vacuum bag was a custom one I made which was large enough to contain the laminates, and small enough to fit inside the bending form. The bending form looked somewhat like a ladder; the laminate stack weaved through the ladder, going over one rung, and under the next, etc.

    Thx for sharing the process - I would have never thought of the ladder rung thing. Beautiful piece.
    Stand for something, or you'll fall for anything.

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