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Thread: Sorting out a super surfacer

  1. #46
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    Agree...a lot of the work you're doing will benefit from very consistent material. If you can get a surface that you like plus that consistency, it's going to help you get things build faster/easier and out the door sooner. I'm going to have to some see that beast sometime...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #47
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    Thanks, Malcolm!

    Jim, mainly I prioritize quality and this gets me a better more consistent result done more efficiently. As I take on more work I am looking at ways to increase quality while also increasing scale. So, if I can get a bit more space I will certainly add shapers for various aspects of tenon making and presses for making glue-ups faster and more efficient. I feel the only way for me to maintain a niche is to prioritize quality at the highest rank, followed by efficiency, etc.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  3. #48
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    Good plan, my friend. Keep the quality while increasing the throughput. Keeps the better half happy, too. .
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #49
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    C3726505-5656-4398-AE1A-893381DC92F7.jpg

    This has been great, I’ve done days and days worth of planing in about one day.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  5. #50
    How does this machine's setup compare to a hand plane - cutting angle, chipbreaker (?) angle and setback? When do you use the skewing feature, which would appear to lower the cutting angle? How much power does it use? How many lineal ft. of clean lumber between knife changeouts? Do you need a knife grinder to go with it or does it use replaceable knives? How did you locate your machine?

    I saw one of these machines at a boat show 35 years ago and was intrigued. There's a custom door outfit in southern VT which I heard has two in line for double surfacing after the thickness planer. Seems like just the thing for small parts, but they never took off in the US. Are they widely used overseas?
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 12-20-2021 at 8:54 AM.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    C3726505-5656-4398-AE1A-893381DC92F7.jpg

    This has been great, I’ve done days and days worth of planing in about one day.
    You need to buy your better half a very large holiday gift so you can wrap it with that ribbon!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #52
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    That's an impressive machine. The speed the work goes through is unbelievable. Once it grabs the piece it's on the other side in a couple seconds. What's the maximum width you can put through it. I'm guessing that most materials are finish ready when it comes out the other side. Look forward to seeing more on this. If there is such a thing as "precision" woodworking I'm thinking it starts here.

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post

    I saw one of these machines at a boat show 35 years ago and was intrigued. There's a custom door outfit in southern VT which I heard has two in line for double surfacing after the thickness planer. Seems like just the thing for small parts, but they never took off in the US. Are they widely used overseas?
    Kevin, these machines are used by some door and window shops in Europe. They are used instead of a wide belt sander as a planed surface holds the finish better than a sanded surface for exterior work. Especially for water based finish. You can still do a little hand orbital sanding after with out affecting this. At the shows ove there they demo these with pine then soaking the workpiece in a bucket of water to show there is no grain raising.

  9. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    C3726505-5656-4398-AE1A-893381DC92F7.jpg

    This has been great, I’ve done days and days worth of planing in about one day.
    Im guessing those shavings are hell on the dust collector

  10. #55
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    Kevin,
    It’s setup very similar to a hand plane. The feed is a drive belt powered by a 3hp motor. No idea on the linear feet but I haven’t worn a blade out yet and I’ve run materiel for about 15 hrs straight, so that’s a lot of material for a single knife. I did not want to buy a grinder so I bought a replaceable knife setup and while I waited for that to arrive I had one of the knives converted into that setup. I have two cutter blocks setup and swap them out between thick and thin shavings. I had a friend refer me to the seller on this one, seemed like a good deal but wasn’t all that great.

    I sunk a bit of money into it replacing the drive belt, the belts, the wiring, the controls, the knives and the motor. Mark referred me to a machine that was a better deal with all things considered. It may still be for sale.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  11. #56
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    Feb 2010
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    Woodstock, VA
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    That shaving is insane Brian! Bravo!

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