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Thread: I think I have been using the wrong side on my table saw all these years?

  1. #1
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    I think I have been using the wrong side on my table saw all these years?

    I have more room to the left side of my saw and I just started using this side of the blade for all my crosscuts. I read somewhere today if my blade tilts to the left(it does) I should be using the right side of the blade for my cuts.

    Is this right? I think so, so I don't trap the material between the blade and the top when doing an angle cut?

    Thanks.

    Brian
    Brian

  2. #2
    No you haven't. This isn't a joke, is it?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    No you haven't. This isn't a joke, is it?
    No joke, just questioning myself. I did read that somewhere today and it was the opposite of whati had been doing. Brian
    Brian

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    If you are doing angled cuts, yes you should do them on the side that the blade tilts away from so you don't trap the workpiece between the blade and the fence. Straight vertical cuts I don't think it matters, use whichever side you feel gives you the best control.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    If you are doing angled cuts, yes you should do them on the side that the blade tilts away from so you don't trap the workpiece between the blade and the fence. Straight vertical cuts I don't think it matters, use whichever side you feel gives you the best control.
    Ok, so you question was correct. Thanks
    Brian

  6. #6
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    What kind of saw do you have with more room on the left? Just curious, most saws that I've seen have more room on the right.
    The side with more room is the side I would use, unless doing the bevel cuts towards the fence......
    I assume you adjusted the fence to 90 degrees so you can use either side. That's what I do. Some folks have it angled away from the blade/miter slot a tiny bit.

  7. #7
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    When I crosscut a bevel on the end of a board, I cut it on the left side of my left tilting saw. Since the piece is under control of the crosscut guide and not trapped by any fence there is no problem with kick back. If I want to do a rip cut bevel, I use the fence on the right side of my blade and the work piece is also to the right of the blade. This cutting is on top of the blade, so also no trapping of the piece. I have the same extensions on both sides of my saw so there is equal work surface on both sides of the blade.
    Lee Schierer
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  8. #8
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    Like Lee, I cross cut on the left side of my left tilting blade. I agree the problem arises from having a board trapped between the blade and fence.
    Ken

  9. #9
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    My tablesaw is left-tilt; the fence stays to the right of the blade.
    I don't bevel often.

    Crosscuts are usually done on a sled, unless it is a very wide panel which can run stable against the fence.

    You do always need to consider your cuts and how the blade/workpiece/fence interact.

    Matt

  10. #10
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    My saws are right tilt, and cut on the left side of the fence.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    When I crosscut a bevel on the end of a board, I cut it on the left side of my left tilting saw. Since the piece is under control of the crosscut guide and not trapped by any fence there is no problem with kick back. If I want to do a rip cut bevel, I use the fence on the right side of my blade and the work piece is also to the right of the blade. This cutting is on top of the blade, so also no trapping of the piece. I have the same extensions on both sides of my saw so there is equal work surface on both sides of the blade.

    this is what I have been doing, but I read something that made me question myself. Thanks. brian
    Brian

  12. #12
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    Non-beveled cuts, use whichever side provides the best support for the workpiece and fits in your available space. Beveled cuts...away from the bevel, so for a left-tilt, to the right; for a right-tilt, to the left. (With most sliders, the blade tilts to the right, but the nature of the machine already provides the support and operator position to the left for the same kind of safety consideration)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    No you haven't. This isn't a joke, is it?

    I used to think that when I would read thees posts. There are folks out there who stand to the right of the fence while ripping, commonly use the miter gauge on the right, and so forth. To each their own but, I take the more often seen operator positions. Left tilt saws do well on bevel cuts with the offcut on the left of the saw so that it falls away from the blade and not on to it. Mention of this may start some people down this road, who knows.

    There are some folks who do some awkward things to stay out of 'the line of fire'. While taking up a safe operator position is always a good idea, standing on one foot and reaching behind your back isn't really safe; I am exaggerating here of course. Stand where you like but above all . . . safety. Do your operations safely and I don't care how you do them
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 10-23-2021 at 11:05 AM.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  14. #14
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    Maybe off topic here but I'm wondering if people ever move the rip fence to the right of the blade while ripping? On my slider the rip fence tows out a bit so the wood never drags on the back side of the blade and cause a kick back. The rip fence is never moved to the left of the blade, and I use the wagon with a parallel guide if I need to rip on the left. It seems to me that on a standard table saw either you have to have the fence dead straight or only rip on the tow out side. Or let the blade drag on the back side and take the risk of kickbacks.
    The Plane Anarchist

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh Betsch View Post
    Maybe off topic here but I'm wondering if people ever move the rip fence to the right of the blade while ripping? On my slider the rip fence tows out a bit so the wood never drags on the back side of the blade and cause a kick back. The rip fence is never moved to the left of the blade, and I use the wagon with a parallel guide if I need to rip on the left. It seems to me that on a standard table saw either you have to have the fence dead straight or only rip on the tow out side. Or let the blade drag on the back side and take the risk of kickbacks.
    On my contractor type saw, the fence when used is to the right side of the blade 99% of the time. I can only recall one or two times I have the fence on the left side of the table when ripping because I needed the extra few inches of table on the right side of the blade to support the plywood. My fence is set as close to straight as I can get it. I use fence mounted feather boards that pull the work piece against the fence as the piece is pushed through the cut.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

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