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Thread: Help me identify my J.A Fay Egan 12in Jointer

  1. #1

    Help me identify my J.A Fay Egan 12in Jointer

    Need help identifying my jointer model. It is a J.A Fay and Egan 12 in jointer I had bought 3-4 years ago. Love the style and of course you can’t beat that old iron look/feel. It has a Babbitt bearing I believe and 2 blade head. I wanting to switch to a spiral cutterhead and possibly change the bearings at the same time but not sure about that. I know there are companies out there that will have you send the head unit in to make it identical but I was hoping I may just be able to order it- surely I’m not the only that has done this to this jointer model. Anyways- its a coffin door style body and is most comparable to the model 61- but the difference being the table adjustment location. I can’t find one like this. I have searched for hours on the internet- any help would be appreciated!! Thanks
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  2. #2
    I would not change the machine to spiral. It will make it cut much slower. That machine will remove 3/4 “ of wood in one pass, may be
    even able to remove whole inch. If you buy REAL M2 or T1 knives you will get a better finish than will get from spiral stuff. That is a good
    machine !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rochester, Minn
    Posts
    173
    Have you looked at the photo index at vintagemachinery.org? That is one of the better resources.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I would not change the machine to spiral. It will make it cut much slower. That machine will remove 3/4 “ of wood in one pass, may be
    even able to remove whole inch. If you buy REAL M2 or T1 knives you will get a better finish than will get from spiral stuff. That is a good
    machine !
    thanks for the response! I have considered this. I am going to sound “dumb” but I wasn’t sure if this machine takes any old 12in knife..haha. Also, the knife set bolts are locked and no amount of degreaser or soling agent has been able to help
    me get these knives loose…

    you think start looking at some of the M2 or T1 knives and that these would likely fit it? Also, any suggestion on breaking these set bolts loose?

    thanks again!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Therneau View Post
    Have you looked at the photo index at vintagemachinery.org? That is one of the better resources.
    Hey thanks for your response. Yep looked there and no luck. Most closely resembles a model 61 but handle placement for table adjust is different-

  6. #6
    I have the 16" version of this same machine. I had a machinist rework the original head to hold 4 modern HSS knives. he also added gib screws. I'll try to take some pix today.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,534
    Gentle heat on each bolt in turn. Not more then 350F or so. Do it on a few at a time then try to remove them. Do not heat all on one side at a time or distortion can occur. Unlikely with that much mass. Tap each one down with a good rap, use a punch for clearance.
    Other method is to remove the entire head and heat it in the oven. You are just trying to use expansion and contraction to break free the rust. Freezing overnight
    can help as well.
    Make sure your wrenches are a good tight fit so they do not round over the heads.
    Bill D

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Gentle heat on each bolt in turn. Not more then 350F or so. Do it on a few at a time then try to remove them. Do not heat all on one side at a time or distortion can occur. Unlikely with that much mass. Tap each one down with a good rap, use a punch for clearance.
    Other method is to remove the entire head and heat it in the oven. You are just trying to use expansion and contraction to break free the rust. Freezing overnight
    can help as well.
    Make sure your wrenches are a good tight fit so they do not round over the heads.
    Bill D

    ok will try it out and keep you guys posted! Thanks again

  9. #9
    Do you know what model it is?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley Gray View Post
    I have the 16" version of this same machine. I had a machinist rework the original head to hold 4 modern HSS knives. he also added gib screws. I'll try to take some pix today.

    do you know what model yours is?

  11. #11
    Aaron, looks to me like your machine uses the standard aprox. 5/32nds or 1/8th thick knives held by gibs. I have no idea as to whether that was a late
    machine or a converted one. So each knife is ‘one piece”. That system is still used.
    Note: I do not know if that is why the Indians sometimes called us “long knives” !!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    Aaron, looks to me like your machine uses the standard aprox. 5/32nds or 1/8th thick knives held by gibs. I have no idea as to whether that was a late
    machine or a converted one. So each knife is ‘one piece”. That system is still used.
    Note: I do not know if that is why the Indians sometimes called us “long knives” !!
    Ha! Okay well thanks so much!! What are your thoughts on converting to a spiral head cutter. Looks like I would likely have to send the entire head unit in to get the right fit. I have seen some that sell for the model 61 but not sure if it will fit mine- the only difference it looks between mine and a model 61 is the table height wheels…wonder if the 61 spiral head would fit mine and save me the trouble of sending it in..???

    thanks again for your help!!

  13. #13
    I prefer the standard one piece knives, made of T-1 or M-2 steel. I think most bad results with using “long knives” are from using low grade
    steel. I have never seen a brand new jointer that came with good knives. In employments it was pretty standard to see the knives of a brand
    new machine removed immediately and shelved. Apparently all the manufacturers wanted to stay price competitive. There are,or were,
    some vendors that that would sell the low grade stuff as “same hardness” as high-speed steel.

  14. #14
    No idea. The oldest catalogs at vintage machinery,con are from 1924 and already have round heads and ball bearings - way newer than our machines.

    F$E made lots of different jointers.

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