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Thread: Table Saw and DC on a 15amp Fuse

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    Table Saw and DC on a 15amp Fuse

    My new table saw & DC are getting delivered next week.

    Table saw pulls 15amp @ 115v or 7.5amp @ 230v
    DC pulls 12amp @ 120v or 6am @ 240v

    I'm sure I would definitely run into problems with them both being on at the same time. My question is what would be the best path to get the electric wired properly to handle both running at the same time?

    Unfortunately the breaker box is on the other side of the house, so it may be fairly costly to run a new line and/or subpanel.

  2. #2
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    Given there needs to be a pull from across the house....do the subpanel so you only do it once. You'll then have a lot more flexibility going forward, too. You really cannot run these two machines on the same circuit and both require a 20amp circuit on 120v. To save cost on your sub, work things out to do a lot of the work yourself to reduce labor for the licensed electrician who completes the work. That's how I handled my subpanel in my temporary shop. I didn't have the long pull like you do, but got everything set up physically so the pro only had to tie things together and test. Do note that depending on the jurisdiction you live in, you may need a permit/inspection. I did here...'could have likely skipped it and got away with it, but that could come back and bite in the future.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Not much to choose there. You need another circuit, and the labor to run cable over that long run will be about the same whether you go with just another circuit or a subpanel.

  4. #4
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    I appreciate both of your comments.

    So I decided to do a little investigating, and I actually have access behind my main fuse box via a crawl space. There is definitely plenty of access to run a new line from my main panel, through the crawl space, and into my garage with minimal effort/cost. I'm not opposed to doing DIY type stuff, but I may defer to an expert to come in and do the work for me.

    I may just run a 50 amp subpanel straight to the garage. Then wire up my table saw and DC to run off independent 220 circuits. Then wire up a few additional 20amp receptacles.

    There wouldn't be any issue having two 220 outlets that my table saw shares down the road with a band saw, right? I mean it isn't like both will ever be on at the same time anyways.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Winter View Post

    There wouldn't be any issue having two 220 outlets that my table saw shares down the road with a band saw, right? I mean it isn't like both will ever be on at the same time anyways.
    I think you answered your own question.

  6. #6
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    THere's no issue with multiple tools sharing the same 240v circuit as long as you wouldn't be using them simultaneously. (or exceed the amperage rating) That's how my temporary shop is setup currently, actually. Machines like the dust collector are best being on their own circuit from other tools.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Winter View Post
    I appreciate both of your comments.

    So I decided to do a little investigating, and I actually have access behind my main fuse box via a crawl space. There is definitely plenty of access to run a new line from my main panel, through the crawl space, and into my garage with minimal effort/cost. I'm not opposed to doing DIY type stuff, but I may defer to an expert to come in and do the work for me.

    I may just run a 50 amp subpanel straight to the garage. Then wire up my table saw and DC to run off independent 220 circuits. Then wire up a few additional 20amp receptacles.

    There wouldn't be any issue having two 220 outlets that my table saw shares down the road with a band saw, right? I mean it isn't like both will ever be on at the same time anyways.
    I would not even consider a 50 amp sub. 6-3/g UF cable cost the same as 2-2-2-4 aluminum SER.
    That would be a 90 amp sub panel.
    Comments made here are my own and, according to my children, do not reflect the opinions of any other person... anywhere, anytime.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Velasquez View Post
    I would not even consider a 50 amp sub. 6-3/g UF cable cost the same as 2-2-2-4 aluminum SER.
    That would be a 90 amp sub panel.
    Yea, that's a good point given the cost of wire these days. I used 2-2-2-4 for my sub. (100 amp, actually, as was approved for the permit). The panel was not expensive. The 100 amp breaker was "up there", but it is what it is.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
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    You can definitely have more than one receptacle per circuit, your local electrical code will specify the maximum number…

    A 50 ampere feed is more than large enough for a hobby shop…….Regards, Rod.

  10. #10
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    Unless you add a 30 amp EV car charger or two.

  11. #11
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    Check ebay and craig's list for heavy cable. I used wire two sizes bigger then needed because I got a good deal from Craigs list. It was cheaper then new 50 amp stuff.
    Depending on local inspector consider a used panel as well.
    Bill D

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Check ebay and craig's list for heavy cable. I used wire two sizes bigger then needed because I got a good deal from Craigs list. It was cheaper then new 50 amp stuff.
    Depending on local inspector consider a used panel as well.
    Bill D
    Unless the panel is a obsolete make, I always recommend the same manufacturer as the main panel, even if it is the worst panel on the market, Eaton BR*, who I refer to as "Zinsco II", Zinsco is one of the two most reviled names in electrical equipment, the other being FPE.

    *The BR line has been under 4 different brands, Bryant, Westinghouse, Cutler-Hammer, & now Eaton.

  13. #13
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    I agree with Rollie. And honestly, new panels are not all that expensive, either. The big breaker to feed it and the hefty wire, well...that can be a different story! The 100 amp breaker that fees my shop sub was a "substantial" percentage of the cost of the brand new panel, even from Amazon.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    You may also wish to pull a permit for this work. I just finished putting a 100 amp sub panel in my shop and was advised that if there was a fire, the insurance company might use the fact of the lack of a permit and inspection to deny coverage.

    A downside of pulling a permit is that the new NEC now requires GFCI breakers on 220 circuits in garages. Unfortunately, a GFCI breaker is incompatible with the electronics of my Felder CF741 and the VFD I use to create 3 phase power on my MiniMax edge sander. My solution was to buy the GFCI breakers from Amazon, install them for the inspection, then replace them with non-GFCI breakers after the inspection. Amazon took the GFCI breakers back no problem.

    I now have 3 30a 220 circuits and a couple of 20a 120 circuits in my shop. The inspector was very complimentary of my work and the conduit bending I did...

    Mike

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike King View Post
    You may also wish to pull a permit for this work. I just finished putting a 100 amp sub panel in my shop and was advised that if there was a fire, the insurance company might use the fact of the lack of a permit and inspection to deny coverage.

    A downside of pulling a permit is that the new NEC now requires GFCI breakers on 220 circuits in garages. Unfortunately, a GFCI breaker is incompatible with the electronics of my Felder CF741 and the VFD I use to create 3 phase power on my MiniMax edge sander. My solution was to buy the GFCI breakers from Amazon, install them for the inspection, then replace them with non-GFCI breakers after the inspection. Amazon took the GFCI breakers back no problem.

    I now have 3 30a 220 circuits and a couple of 20a 120 circuits in my shop. The inspector was very complimentary of my work and the conduit bending I did...

    Mike
    You do realize you just published publicly that your system does not meet code so the extra cost and effort to temporarily meet code is wasted.

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