Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Outdoor table wood selection and movement

  1. #1

    Outdoor table wood selection and movement

    I want to make a 27" diameter outdoor table. I'm in NJ and it will mostly be in shade. I'm gonna have a vinyl cover made to protect the table from the elements. I'm planning on making the table out of Sepele. I want to have a full-size peace sign inlay in the table. I'm looking for advice on the inlay and wood movement. I want the inlay to be a dark wood, but I haven't decided on what to use. I'd appreciate an suggestions. Woods I'm considering are Ipe (I know this is a good wood for outdoors), bubinga, walnut. There are two different approaches I'm considering for the peace sign. First is to make the tabletop out of sepele, then use the CNC to cut a shallow peace sign pocket, maybe 1/4" deep, then glue the dark wood into the peace sign pocket. I'd have the grain of both woods go in the same direction. The other option is to make the peace sign the same thickness as the sepele, them put it all together with dowel tenons. I'd still have all the grain go in the same direction. I'd appreciate any advice or potential problems.

  2. #2
    Teak works well outdoors.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,896
    You might consider thermally-modified wood. It is dark, and it is rot-resistant. My local Woodcraft sells some brand of it. The cost is competitive with those woods you're considering.

  4. #4
    Never heard of that. Iíll have to look into it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    2,112
    walnut is not good outside.
    Hobbyist

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    walnut is not good outside.
    Good to know, thanks

  7. #7
    I was always told that walnut held up well outside, except for the white sap wood.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    walnut is not good outside.
    Why do you say that? Walnut (heartwood) is rated as highly decay resistant and is dimensionally stable. Color stability in sunlight is an issue. What other parameters are you considering?

    Sapele, ipe, bubinga and walnut all seem like reasonable choices to me.

    I would inlay the design.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 10-21-2021 at 9:29 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    2,112
    I think it attracts insects, and decays in contact with wet. My experience with just a few indoor pieces that were left outside. I defer to more experts.
    Hobbyist

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,501
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    I think it attracts insects, and decays in contact with wet. My experience with just a few indoor pieces that were left outside. I defer to more experts.
    The heartwood of non steamed black walnut is Definitely rot and insect resistant. I donít know about commercially produced steamed walnut though. Weíre your pieces made from English walnut or steamed (muddy brown color) walnut?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    2,112
    Native steamed black walnut, which is very common here.
    Hobbyist

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •