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Thread: Need Source for Quality Brass Screws

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    158

    Need Source for Quality Brass Screws

    Hello,
    I'm just finishing a jewelry box that I worked on for quite a while and installing the Brusso hinges is the last step. I plan on using steel screws and a pilot hole before the brass screws...but I was wondering if anyone has found a source for better brass, or bronze screws...the idea of snapping a screw head off at this point is pretty anxiety provoking! I'm specially looking for #4; 5/8 inch screws. Thanks in advance!
    Izzy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    473
    I've been happy with brass screws from McFeely's.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    944
    I've been getting oval slot-head screws from Bolt Depot, which they call Silicone Bronze. Essentially these are bronze with a small amount of silicone, and are designed for marine environments. I like them.

    I've used them where I want the screw heads to show. Like you plan to do I used a stainless steel screw from the same manufacturer first to form the threads.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKean, PA
    Posts
    13,786
    Quote Originally Posted by Izzy Charo View Post
    Hello,
    I'm just finishing a jewelry box that I worked on for quite a while and installing the Brusso hinges is the last step. I plan on using steel screws and a pilot hole before the brass screws...but I was wondering if anyone has found a source for better brass, or bronze screws...the idea of snapping a screw head off at this point is pretty anxiety provoking! I'm specially looking for #4; 5/8 inch screws. Thanks in advance!
    Izzy
    You need to do just one more step not mentioned above. Lubricate the brass screw threads by scraping the threads over a chunk of beeswax and mash the flacks into the threads with your warm fingers. This wax will significantly reduce the torque needed to set the screws tight, which will significantly reduce the chance of breakage. Paraffin and soap don't work nearly as well and soap may discolor your wood.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    3,025
    I buy brass hinge screws from craft Inc. They are very good and not expensive at all.
    One point Id like to make I bought my last batch at the beginning of the crisis. Its possible their inventory is low.https://craft-inc.com/
    Good Luck
    Aj

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    22
    I purchased some from McMaster-Carr
    https://www.mcmaster.com/screws/bras...rews-for-wood/ they are very nice.
    Last edited by Jim Braun; 10-15-2021 at 3:34 PM.
    Come join us at the Central Jersey Woodworkers Association www.cjwa.org

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,965
    Lee Valley has brass screws. I run a steel screw the same size first them remove and wax the brass one then install it.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    Lee Valley has brass screws. I run a steel screw the same size first them remove and wax the brass one then install it.
    I do basically the same, but I wax both the steel screw and the brass screw. Waxing the steel screw gets wax in the hole so that when you put the brass screw in (with wax on it) the hole is already lubricated. I find that paraffin works the best. I tried beeswax, and that works, but paraffin works better.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    361
    Bolt Depot. We use hundreds of #4 screws in repairing old windows. Haven't broke one yet.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Jim Mackell
    Arundel, ME

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,529
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    You need to do just one more step not mentioned above. Lubricate the brass screw threads by scraping the threads over a chunk of beeswax and mash the flacks into the threads with your warm fingers. This wax will significantly reduce the torque needed to set the screws tight, which will significantly reduce the chance of breakage. Paraffin and soap don't work nearly as well and soap may discolor your wood.
    I have two methods depending on quanity. For small batches I pick up a screw by the head or near the head with needle nose pliers. give it a quick shot with a propane torch then rub it on some wax. Put in a metal can to cool.
    For more I melt some wax in a tin can and dip each screw tip in with needle nose pliers. I have a can of wax and will melt the top 1/4" with a torch to do this. Do it outside with a metal lid to cover the can if it burns. An electric coffee pot is a good wax melter.
    Bill D

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Quorn United Kingdom
    Posts
    639
    "I wax both the steel screw and the brass screw. Waxing the steel screw gets wax in the hole so that when you put the brass screw in (with wax on it) the hole is already lubricated."

    I live in the United kingdom and I was taught that exact procedure 51 years ago at the age of 13 by
    Mr. Major our school woodwork teacher ,who had taught at the school for 34 years

    On the first woodworking class aged 11. Mr. Major would ask each child to call out thier surname The boy next to me said Cutler

    Mr. Major said "Yes lad and I taught your dad"

    To this day most the boys I went to school usually call each other by thier surname and not thier Christian name as was practice and custom by the school teachers
    Last edited by Brian Deakin; 10-18-2021 at 1:55 PM.

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