Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: What's a kilopascal?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tippecanoe County, IN
    Posts
    823
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    Any relation to Fig? That's the only Newton most Yanks are going to be familiar with. I get along reasonably well with many metric measures but Newton just doesn't compute for me. Aircraft engine output is often expressed as pounds of thrust or KiloNewtons. There are of course online converters but that's one unit of measure I have trouble getting my head around.
    I find Newtons to be less confusing than poundals, slugs, poundmass and poundforce.
    Beranek's Law:

    It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion.
    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,824
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    ... US medical field did go metric.
    It's funny, though. Every doctor I know has an intuitive feel for metric weights in kg. But list a height in cm, and we all reach for our calculators to see how tall that is.

    I always spoke to one of our English surgeons about how many stones the patient weighed. He always got a chuckle out of that.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,538
    Whats the question? Did the first post get deleted?
    A kilopascal is 1000 regular pascals.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 10-16-2021 at 8:31 PM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Anaheim, California
    Posts
    6,397
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    For me a useful number is that a psi equals about 7 kilopascals.
    Kilopascal is a unit of measure designed solely to scare you into thinking your tires are going flat.

    This happens when the digital gauge which normally displays "32.0 PSI" starts displaying "220 KPa". In both cases, the unit and the decimal point are far too small to see in a dimly-lit garage. By the time you figure out what's going on, you've turned on the compressor, pulled out the hose, and pumped up the tire to 46PSI or so. DAMHIKT.

    The gauge in question now has a double layer of duct tape over the button that changes units.
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee DeRaud View Post
    Kilopascal is a unit of measure designed solely to scare you into thinking your tires are going flat.

    This happens when the digital gauge which normally displays "32.0 PSI" starts displaying "220 KPa". In both cases, the unit and the decimal point are far too small to see in a dimly-lit garage. By the time you figure out what's going on, you've turned on the compressor, pulled out the hose, and pumped up the tire to 46PSI or so. DAMHIKT.

    The gauge in question now has a double layer of duct tape over the button that changes units.
    That's a really funny story. I'll watch out for that.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,580
    Quote Originally Posted by David L Morse View Post
    I find Newtons to be less confusing than poundals, slugs, poundmass and poundforce.
    Exactly, Iím always lost with the imperial system.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,980
    Hi Rod
    The only place poundals, slugs, pound force and pound mass are to be found is in textbooks. They are arcane. PSI is found and understood everywhere in north america. Newtons, not so much.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tippecanoe County, IN
    Posts
    823
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Hi Rod
    The only place poundals, slugs, pound force and pound mass are to be found is in textbooks. They are arcane. PSI is found and understood everywhere in north america. Newtons, not so much.
    To me psf is more intuitive than psi.
    Beranek's Law:

    It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion.
    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •