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Thread: DC Closets, Venting and Sound Deadening

  1. #1
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    DC Closets, Venting and Sound Deadening

    Been in travail over building a closet outside the s'hanger for the dust collector (and loose the drive through shed roof down the side) or build a closet inside. Having studied the left hand inlet on the DC for awhile, I've about made up my mind to give up the floor and locate the DC closet inside the s'hanger (shop) and vent outside with a capability to bifurcate the exhaust and use damper(s) for a filter return should the sky lights not heat the floor space in the winter - they sure do in the summer.

    After the move we have plethora of flattened cardboard boxes. Some light weight and some quality, heavy Uline boxes. All sizes including wardrobes. If I double stud the closet, would repurposing the cardboard weaving it between the two sets of studs provide any noise abatement? Compared to batt insulation, better or worse? Any one have first hand experience?

    And I'm not above re-visiting an outside closet, but I do like driving through that shed roof portion with truck or tractor without dodging impediments. The shed is about 10 wide, runs the full 40' of the building, and is 11' on the high side against the s'hanger with maybe a 2' drop to the open side. Pouring a 4' X 8' pad parallel to the shed and spacing it out from the building takes away that drive through capability. FWIW, I can only access the shed at each end due to grading along the outside open wall, about a 2' drop into the shed at one end and tapers to 0 at the other end (grass taxi way, fyi).

    I'll be listening.

  2. #2
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    Yes for the closet, inside or out. Yes, to a non-direct return air path being available should you need to bring air back inside the shop as you note. Yes to insulating the closet walls, but no to the cardboard. In invest in some rockwool or even denser fiberglass insulation for the core of the wall; drywall on the shop side and consider doing what I did at my old shop...1/4" pegboard installed rough side toward the inside of the closet to break up bouncing sound. These things work with both a single or double stud wall design.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Yes to what Jim says, and a big no to the cardboard. Google "triple leaf effect" and you'll find lots of reading on why you don't want to do this. Basically, the layers of cardboard in the stud cavity can resonate with the vibrations coming through the drywall & actually increase sound transmission.

  4. #4
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    Definitely NO on the cardboard … beyond not being an effective sound dampening approach for reasons mentioned above, it is going to be delicious bug food over time!
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  5. #5
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    I agree with Tom about cardboard being bug food, someday. Can't address the sound deadening effect of cardboard, looks like Jim and Frank have that covered.

    I do think keeping your drive through option open is a good thing.

  6. #6
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    If the sound is still an issue after adding rockwool, try hanging heavy moving blankets on curtain rods inside the closet. Easily available on Amazon. It led to an additional 10dB noise reduction in my closeted cyclone. Cheap and very effective.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

  7. #7
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    Thank you all. Very helpful!

  8. #8
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    Density is your friend for sound abatement. Air is a great insulator, but does nothing to reduce sound -- cardboard and batt insulation are mostly air.

    Think heavy sheet rock (even double layer), heavy/drnse fabric (bugs?), rock wool, dense rubber, etc., to reduce sound transmission -- the denser & thicker, the smaller the vibrations for the same sound energy.

    Think soft, irregular surfaces to reduce and/or disperse sound reflections, like dense fabric, Celotex, dense rubber. It's been ages, but for sound studios we used a layer of rubber sandwiched between two layers of sheet rock and surfaced with a Celotex-like acoustic ceiling tile.

    The rubber is nice, because it flexes internally, turning physical vibrations into heat (absorbing them). Today, for home shop, I would consider rubber mats for horse stalls. I'm facing the same dust collector sound issue.

  9. #9
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    Rockwood has dense material specifically for the sound abatement application.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Rockwood has dense material specifically for the sound abatement application.
    You probably meant Rockwool brand (blame the spell checker!)

  11. #11
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    Indeed...fat fingered it!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    There is also sound-attenuating drywall out there -- Quiet Rock is one I'm familiar with (from commercial construction days). There are, I think, at least two options for it, with different dB 'ratings'. I know there are other brands also. While it's more expensive than regular drywall, it would only take a few sheets to sheath a closet. Combine this with rockwool and you'd be doing pretty well.
    Don't let it bring you down,
    It's only castles burning,
    Just find someone who's turning,
    And you will come around

    Neil Young (with a little bit of emphasis added by me)

    Board member, Gulf Coast Woodturners Association

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Mooney View Post
    There is also sound-attenuating drywall out there -- Quiet Rock is one I'm familiar with (from commercial construction days). There are, I think, at least two options for it, with different dB 'ratings'. I know there are other brands also. While it's more expensive than regular drywall, it would only take a few sheets to sheath a closet. Combine this with rockwool and you'd be doing pretty well.
    Like way more expensive. Last I priced it, it was several times the cost of 2 layers of 5/8 drywall and Greenglue, which also has a better STC rating.

  14. #14
    My cyclone closet is OSB walls lined with acoustic ceiling tile. The outlet is the doors being about 4 inches off the floor. I had some tile left over, so I just put the loose pieces in the closet. That reduces most of the noise to the point that my ceiling hung air filters make more noise.

    What I do get still though is the low frequency rumble from the cyclone being mounted on the wall. It transmits through the walls into the building. When I eventually move the cyclone, I will fabricate up a stand so that the cyclone rests only on the floor, and probably with some kind of vibration damping rubber on the feet as well.

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