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Thread: House Windows

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Chicagoland
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    2,752

    House Windows

    I need to replace three upstairs windows that have RO of 71" wide x 39-1/2" high. My current windows are two pane sliding windows and both panels can slide.

    Looking at replacements (Andersen at HD):

    1) I can find sliding windows for just under $600 each but seems only one panel slides.
    2) There are casement available in either two or three casements or two casements and a picture window in the middle. These are about $1300 each.

    Some say the casements seal better but we never really had any issues with the sliding. Any help choosing window type appreciated.

    (also, seems to be 16-18 week wait time on the windows)

    Thanks
    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    6,085
    The Pella casement windows we have in our house, that I built in 1980, still work flawlessly-every one of them. I haven't built a new house since 2007, so have no advice to offer on what's available now.

  3. #3
    I just put in some vinyl Jeld-Wen casements and sliders, via Menards. They seem too work just fine. I don't know that the casements are particularly better than the sliders; they both seem to seal well. Definitely better than the 45 year old wood windows that they replaced. I've had Jeld-Wen sliders on my shop for the last 10 years with no issues. It seems Jeld-Wen's lead time was around 2-3 months last I checked.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    NE OH
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    Casements tend to seal better over time because the seals are under compression everywhere, and the seal only gets tighter when the wind blows. On sliders the only seal under compression is along one stile; the others are sliding seals. But with modern materials, even the sliding seals are better than on old windows and if you don't open and close them often, the seals don't wear out quickly. You can compare air leakage ratings to get an idea how the two styles compare; just keep in mind that the seals on a slider tend to degrade more with wear than those on a slider.

    With Casements, you need clearance where they open; sliders don't. Casements have the potential to allow more air movement because the entire window opens, on a slider only half the total area can ever be open. This may also be a factor if your window needs to meet the egress standards.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
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    4,761
    What Paul said. Sliding windows are mostly used because they are cheap. To me, casements are all around a better window than sliding windows. My current house had sliding windows that were rotten when I bought the house. I had the windows replaced with Andersen 400 series casement windows before I moved in.

    My first house the builder put an Andersen 400 series gliding window in the basement for egress. (Andersen calls them gliding windows, not sliding.) That sliding window was actually pretty decent as Andersen uses a good latching system on the 400 series. Your typical builder's grade vinyl sliding window is nowhere near the quality of that Andersen sliding window. If I was going to spend the money on Andersen 400 series sliding windows I would just upgrade to casements.
    Last edited by Brian Elfert; 10-15-2021 at 9:40 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    473
    We replaced a bunch of 1960's vintage sliders with Peachtree casement windows about 30 years ago. When we left that home 5 years ago, all were still working well and the seals were still good. They definitely sealed better than the old sliders, but the old sliders were nothing special to start with.

    One other advantage of casement windows, particularly on a second floor, is that you can wash both sides of the window from inside.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Medina Ohio
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    4,194
    I replaced my sliders with Jeldwen casements and they are much better. I do have a Anderson casement in the living room

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKean, PA
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    13,780
    I have three side sliding windows in my home that were made by Great Lakes Windows that both sides of the window can slide. They still offer that type of window.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Florida
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    All our opening windows upstairs are casements and I guess they're OK but they have their quirks. I don't know what brand we have. The house was was built with no shortcuts but is not luxurious.

    To close the casements tightly by closing the latch, we usually must remove the screen and pull the window shut. The crank won't quite do it.

    The screens are on the inside.

    You can't put an air conditioner in one of the windows.

    The bottom of the opening is fragile because it is hollowed out for the crank. If it's the window you crawl through to get onto part of the roof it's easy to break it. On the plus side, the opening is higher than double-hung would be but it's narrower.

    The windows can be removed and brought into the house for cleaning or repair, but it's not easy. Maybe if I were younger....

    If covering up your windows for hurricanes is an issue, you can't open the window to install anything because it protrudes out.

    I'd rather have single- or double-hung.
    Last edited by Alan Rutherford; 10-15-2021 at 10:47 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Minneapolis, MN
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    Sure, you can't put a window air conditioner in a casement window, but most houses old enough to need window air conditioners also tend not to have casement windows. Even here in Minneapolis central A/C has been installed in the majority of new houses since the late 1970s. I suspect the only new houses built in this area since 1990 without central A/C were really, really cheap starter houses, or the buyer of the new house specifically requested no air conditioning.

    Most homeowners aren't using windows to get out on the roof often enough to worry about breaking the window.

  11. #11
    My friend is a builder and installed double hung windows in one part of my house and sliding windows in the back room overlooking the marsh. Both are Anderson new construction windows. The sliders look good in the back room, but I think the double hung seem much more rock solid.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Medina Ohio
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    1 nice thing about casements is that you can open them to catch a breeze like the old vent windows on cars

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Florida
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    426
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    Sure, you can't put a window air conditioner in a casement window, but most houses old enough to need window air conditioners also tend not to have casement windows. Even here in Minneapolis central A/C has been installed in the majority of new houses since the late 1970s. I suspect the only new houses built in this area since 1990 without central A/C were really, really cheap starter houses, or the buyer of the new house specifically requested no air conditioning.

    Most homeowners aren't using windows to get out on the roof often enough to worry about breaking the window.
    I can't argue with either of those statements and our house and our location (Florida) are probably very different from the OP's. Just my experience. The window AC is what you use when the power goes out and you run an extension cord from the generator to power it because you don't have whole-house backup power. You also install one if you are concerned that someone might acquire a disease that makes it unwise to be spreading the air from one bedroom through the rest of the house. And I did install the AC butI had to remove the window.

    Another gripe I didn't mention is that in swinging that window out into the breeze you are also exposing it to the the rain and the upper corner deteriorates faster than the rest of the window. The outside surface is covered with house paint but the inside is natural wood with a beautiful clear finish that's easily damaged and hard to repair.
    Last edited by Alan Rutherford; 10-16-2021 at 1:06 PM.

  14. #14
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    Nov 2006
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    N.E. Ohio
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    I suspect the only new houses built in this area since 1990 without central A/C were really, really cheap starter houses, or the buyer of the new house specifically requested no air conditioning.
    We are building a new house.
    I wish we could leave out the central air, but we can't.

    Things like appliances and central air are items that should never be included in the mortgage. You'll end up paying for them for years after they have gone bad.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Minneapolis, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    We are building a new house.
    I wish we could leave out the central air, but we can't.

    Things like appliances and central air are items that should never be included in the mortgage. You'll end up paying for them for years after they have gone bad.
    Why can't you leave out the central air? If you don't want the central air and appliances covered by the mortgage can't you just increase the down payment by the cost of the central air and appliances?

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