Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 33

Thread: Battery Jumpers

  1. #16
    I've had to use mine a few times when I left thr lights on and it always started the car, but it would not start a friends boat .any ideas why? does a boat take more power or something?
    If the Help and advice you received here was of any VALUE to you PLEASE! Become a Contributor
    Rabbit RL_XX_6040-60 watt Laser engraving/cutting machine Oh wait its a 3D Printer my bad LOL
    Lasercut 5.3
    CorelDraw X5

    10" Miter Saw with slide
    10" Table Saw
    8" bench mount 5 speed Drill Press
    Dremel, 3x21 Belt Sander


  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Anaheim, California
    Posts
    6,399
    Quote Originally Posted by Bert Kemp View Post
    I've had to use mine a few times when I left thr lights on and it always started the car, but it would not start a friends boat .any ideas why? does a boat take more power or something?
    What type of motor?

    I've never tried one on an old-school engine, i.e. one with mechanical fuel pump, carburetor, and standard ignition. I suspect those need more from the battery/starter than what we consider standard in today's engines.
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee DeRaud View Post
    What type of motor?

    I've never tried one on an old-school engine, i.e. one with mechanical fuel pump, carburetor, and standard ignition. I suspect those need more from the battery/starter than what we consider standard in today's engines.

    50 HP outboard
    If the Help and advice you received here was of any VALUE to you PLEASE! Become a Contributor
    Rabbit RL_XX_6040-60 watt Laser engraving/cutting machine Oh wait its a 3D Printer my bad LOL
    Lasercut 5.3
    CorelDraw X5

    10" Miter Saw with slide
    10" Table Saw
    8" bench mount 5 speed Drill Press
    Dremel, 3x21 Belt Sander


  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    4,251
    Blog Entries
    11
    As with most jumpers, you will have better luck if you attach the jumpers (or jump pack) and give it a minute to dump some juice into the vehicle's battery before engaging the starter.
    NOW you tell me...

  5. #20
    20 years ago, I was given a cheapo Kmart special jumper unit. Weighed about 15 pounds. Sure did the trick around the farm with all the different equipment, trucks, tractors and batteries. It just died about 7 years ago. Got another better model, don't recall what brand, but I could charge/operate cell phones and operate the 12 volt TV we had during outages. Right nor we have mostly new vehicles and so I no longer have one. Have a couple trickle chargers I use on the equipment to keep the batteries up, especially when a winter storm is expected. My back hoe/loader is the one that is the most trouble to start in the cold.and of course it is the most powerful and efficient at clearing the 982ft driveway. (Sometimes takes longer to start than the 15 minutes for the machine to clear the driveway.)

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,728
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post

    The way around this is to take care of your vehicle and be aware of signs of an old or weak battery. If you leave your lights on when turning off the engine and the lights go dim, your battery is close to failure. There are other signs if you are good at trouble shooting with a voltage meter.

    It is also wise to make sure the battery is kept clean. Someone once gave me a demonstration by placing a couple of quarters on top of my battery and then touching the probes of a volt meter to the quarters. It indicated the dirt on the top of the battery was conducting electricity and draining my battery 24/7.

    Decent jumper cables are usually easy to tell by the quality of their build and making sure they are made with an adequate size wire. The clamps/clips at the ends should be able to connect to top mounted or side mounted battery terminals.

    jtk
    I noticed some corrosion on a battery terminal and made up a solution of baking soda and water. The solution and a brush cleaned up the terminal. I then dumped what was left of the baking soda solution on the top of the battery. The whole top surface began to fizz so yeah. Cigarette lighter - USB adapters are common. Some of them include voltmeters. If the voltmeter doesn't show about 13.5 volts or more with the engine running I'd wonder about the charging. If the volts are less than 12 with the engine being off for a couple hours I'd consider a new battery before winter. Seems like a useful gadget for a few bucks.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    11,347
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    I noticed some corrosion on a battery terminal and made up a solution of baking soda and water. The solution and a brush cleaned up the terminal. ...
    How I eliminate corrosion of battery terminals: Clean terminals and connectors well. Coat the connecting surfaces with dielectric grease. Tighten firmly. Cover the entire terminal and connector (and wire ends) with a thick coating of heavy grease. No corrosion, ever.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    1,226
    The jump starters are rated on Consumer Reports, FWIW. Noco gets knocked...Antigravity, Bolt, Spirit, New Brights and Powerall recommended.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    3,696
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I have several and have used them often over the years. Those I have are large and heavy, with built-in inverters for 110v, one with an air compressor.
    But I wouldn't be without good jumper cables. While the battery jump starters work fine for the most part I need way more power to jump start my skid steer with a diesel engine.

    One thing I WON'T ever do again is buy one of those tiny units like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B084ZPSG5N
    I don't know if they lie about the capability, if the one I bought was not up to par, or if my expectations were too high but even after a fresh full charge it wouldn't start a car here.

    JKJ
    I gave my son one like this. He used it to start his FIL's car. So... I know they can work.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,269
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rainey View Post
    The jump starters are rated on Consumer Reports, FWIW. Noco gets knocked...Antigravity, Bolt, Spirit, New Brights and Powerall recommended.
    Why is the Noco not rated high? You said antigravity, what does that mean?? What makes it different?
    Last edited by John Terefenko; 10-20-2021 at 12:37 AM.
    John T.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    1,226
    John, Consumer Reports rates the jump packs in 3 areas: warm temp jumps, cold temp jumps & reserve capacity which estimates how long the jump pack can be used to power other electrical equipment such as cell phones & laptops. The Noco was fair in cold jumps, & poor in reserve capacity. The antigravity jump pack was better in cold jump & reserve. All jump packs were poor at 0 degrees when the car battery and jump pack were at that temperature. The jump pack had to be warmed up to perform.

  12. #27
    I had to use my Bolt unit yesterday to start my tractor, saved a lot of hassle.
    On the unit I have, you connect it, press the button and wait until it tells you it's ready to start. I find it works well.
    Now I have to shop for a new battery.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    24,126
    Blog Entries
    1
    I noticed some corrosion on a battery terminal and made up a solution of baking soda and water. The solution and a brush cleaned up the terminal. I then dumped what was left of the baking soda solution on the top of the battery. The whole top surface began to fizz so yeah.
    People in my past have killed a car battery that way. It depends on the caps on cell covers. if the baking soda gets to the acid in the battery it can neutralize it. Mixing alkali and acid solutions can make a lot fizz.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 10-21-2021 at 12:27 PM. Reason: Changed 'tips of' to 'caps on'
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,728
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    People in my past have killed a car battery that way. It depends on the tips of cell covers. if the baking soda gets to the acid in the battery it can neutralize it. Mixing alkali and acid solutions can make a lot fizz.

    jtk
    So far so good. The battery is supposed to be sealed, there is no way to service it. Why is there an acidic deposit on the top? I presume there's some sort of vent. Is that where whatever the baking soda reacted with came from?

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    24,126
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Harms View Post
    So far so good. The battery is supposed to be sealed, there is no way to service it. Why is there an acidic deposit on the top? I presume there's some sort of vent. Is that where whatever the baking soda reacted with came from?
    It may have reacted to something else. A lead/acid battery can outgas hydrogen and other contents as it charges. A sealed battery contains or is supposed to contain this. Older batteries had to be topped off occasionally. In olden days the guys pumping your gas would often check one or more of the battery's cells while looking under the hood.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •