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Thread: Acoustic guitar stands

  1. #1

    Acoustic guitar stands

    These stands are laminated using pieces cut from a larger plank. Band sawed thin then placed through my sanding planer to achieve the final thickness of 1/16". The pieces were cold bent over three different jigs to create the separate pieces. Due to the extreme curvature I glued only two lams at a time using West epoxy, a 1/8" bending ply backer wrapped in waxed paper and individual 1/4" melamine pieces under each clamp pad. Working with only two pieces at a time, and using epoxy as the glue, greatly reduces spring back during each glue up and ultimately the final piece is as close to the drawn curve as I need for assembly.

    This stand is made of genuine mahogany, as MacBeath Hardwoods calls it, however I have found that there is a variety of "genuine" mahogany's out there being sold as such that vary in density and color. In the 70's we called it Honduras however Honduras is no longer available (legally) in the US so we get mahogany from a variety of areas. The odd thing about looking for wood these days is that I can go through an entire pallet and not find two pieces from the same tree.

    With this piece I found the darker of the two was a stiffer stand with less flex so I have been experimenting with subtle changes to the dimensions and have increased the angle of the wedge by 1/8" at its tallest point allowing the guitar to centralize it weight a tad better. Both stands are about 2 1/2 lbs. Sealed with shellac then multiple coats of wipe on poly with a
    final wax with Renaissance.





    2E9A8425.jpg2E9A8380.jpg2E9A8406.jpg2E9A8415.jpgIMG_4350.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Clarks Summit PA
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    1,226
    Kent, those are arresting guitar stands! The finest I have ever seen. What do you mean by "sanding planer"? How many laminations for each piece? A final thickness of 1/16 inch is pretty thin and flexible. Have you tried to do all laminations at once and noticed significant springback? Thanks for the pics!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    N. Idaho
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    1,273
    Stunning indeed! I especially like the mirroring of the two stands together that evoke the shape of a guitar. Thanks for sharing.
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  4. #4
    Mark,

    I guess technically they are called drum sanders or thickness sanders. The longest section on the stands I'm currently making have between 5 and 6 laminations. I did experiments with having one with 8 lams but felt it looked too clunky. It's far easier to glue fewer pieces than the entire stack. The more lams you work with the stiffer the unit is and the more resistance to bending. Its also harder to keep the lams in alignment. And yes, if you glue up all at once with these tight bends you will get spring back. Not a lot but enough to alter the curve I need. With what amounts to a three day glue up, when the glue has cured and the clamps come off the shapes of the pieces are exactly where I want them so it's a perfect match when I join the inner brace to the long curved section.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    WNY
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    7,770
    Of those are so nice. And somehow they look almost animated to me, like they could start walking at any second.

    John

  6. #6
    Thpose are really nice!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    SE Michigan
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    3,127
    Great design, well done! Nicest guitar stands Iíve seen.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Those are darn sexy git-fiddle stands! Wow! Nice design and craftsmanship.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
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    Apr 2013
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    Kansas City
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    2,004
    That would look really good on stage.
    Hobbyist

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    SE South Dakota
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    1,500
    OK! I see you have an empty one, or perhaps it was the trial run one?
    Where are you selling these at!!???
    Fantastic!

    Bruce
    Epilog TT 35W, 2 LMI SE225CV's
    CorelDraw 4 through 11
    CarveWright
    paper and pencils

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Putney, Vermont
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    Just when you thought you had seen it all.
    They are the nicest guitar stands I have ever seen.
    Really nice Kent.

  12. #12
    Bruce, the empty one was left empty for the sake of the photography to help define the stand. I started posting on my Instagram site (kpwoodenstone) and the first bite was singer/songwriter David Crosby. Yeah.... fun stuff. I've since had two more orders and will continue to make them for a bit as once I got all the wrinkles out of the design they are pretty easy. I list them on my web site.

    Just started making one out of Sapelle with a slightly refine base which, if it turns out, I may enter it in the Sonoma Woodworker's "Artistry In Wood" show. In actually held in Santa Rosa. LOTS of tremendous talent at this yearly show, Their web site has photos of previous years work for those that are interested. https://www.sonomawoodworkers.com/Ar...ood-slideshows

    Thanks to everyone for the nice comments !

  13. #13
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    May 2007
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    Trinidad, West Indies
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    450
    Very nice. Thanks for sharing.

    MK

  14. #14
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Clearly, you have found one of those elusive niches where design, art and function gell in a beautiful way! Even if you don't sell a "million" of them, you'll know that anyone who does pony up is doing so because they appreciate what you have created.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
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    Kent, you can buy Honduras mahogany in the form of sinker logs that are being savaged from river bottoms. Check with Greener Lumber in Macon, Missouri as a good source. They sell sequential boards from the same tree.
    Hobbyist

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