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Thread: Breaking up a cast iron bathtub

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Florida
    Posts
    426

    Breaking up a cast iron bathtub

    It's time to get rid of the claw-footed cast iron bathtub that came with our house and it's going to have to go the hard way - in little pieces. I will have some help in the brawn department but planning is up to me. I did this once before about 50 years ago but I was younger, stronger and dumber then and don't remember much about it. We'll have glassses, earmuffs and standard dust masks. Do we want Tyvek suits and duct tape or is that overkill? I'll tape up the cabinets. Do I need plastic on the walls?

    I've heard the suggestions about covering the tub with a moving blanket or similar. Worth doing?

    I have one of those little one-handed air hammers that runs off an air compressor. Would it be a waste of time trying that before we get the sledge out? Anything else?

    Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    It won't fit through the doors?

    I've never broken one up, so sorry, no advice on that.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    885
    sledge hammer and go at it, won't take long
    air hammer is a waste of time
    good luck
    Ron

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Florida
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    426
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    It won't fit through the doors?....
    It would fit through the doors. Then it has to go down the sprial staircase or over the railing to the first floor. It feels like about 350 pounds. It could probably be done with a block and tackle from the ceilng but I don't think it's worth the efffort and risk. If it goes out the window it has to clear the roof of the covered porch below. We'd need a crane.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
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    6,066
    +1 to what Ron said & let me add watch out for sharp edges.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    593
    Sledgehammer

  7. #7
    I broke one up a long time ago with a sledgehammer. As I remember, it wasn't that difficult but I was a lot younger then.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Florida
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    426
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    I broke one up a long time ago with a sledgehammer. As I remember, it wasn't that difficult but I was a lot younger then.

    Mike
    That's how I remember it and I'm kinda looking forward to it. My only real concern is what's going to happen if that bathroom isn't useable by the middle of the night.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    The Hartland of Michigan
    Posts
    7,472
    Got a utility sink?

  10. #10
    Alan, I agree with Myk, living with 3 daughters and wife and one bathroom a man learns where the utility sink is.................

    Please post how you mae out, I have one at my Father in Laws tht is upstairs and I would prefer not to remove it in one piece.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    The Hartland of Michigan
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    7,472
    Well, golly, guys. Someone had to carry the tub upstairs. Can't be too hard to get it back down.
    😁

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by myk rian View Post
    well, golly, guys. Someone had to carry the tub upstairs. Can't be too hard to get it back down.

    ouch! :d

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Northeastern OK
    Posts
    95
    Cast iron breaks ridiculously easy. Sledgehammer is all you need along with some eye protection and ear plugs.

  14. #14
    The sledge works fine. Be aware that the blows will turn the porcelain into flying razor blades, gloves, a face shield, long sleeves and pants are a must! It doesn't make much dust but you'll find little shards of porcelain all over for awhile.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,526
    Consider notching with an angle grinder to create a starting point. A drill will not touch the porcelain.
    Bill D.

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