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Thread: Windows 11

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    Just google "how to test if my computer will run windows 11" and you'll get a link to the Microsoft page.

    Here's a link - https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/windows-11 Go to the bottom of the page.

    Mike
    Thanks Mike, I passed !
    Sometimes we see what we expect to see, and not what we are looking at! Scott

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Bokros View Post
    I downloaded Win10 only because H&R Block tax software required it. The computer running Win10 must be rebooted about every other day or it is slower than 1 cylinder VW. The computer it is runningg on is only five years old. Glad I didn't down load it to my laptop.

    My impression of Win10 is it stinks worse than a backed up sewer.
    I had a Win10 Enterprise desktop at work that was slower than molasses in Antarctica for about 18 months. Horribly frustrating to use. I complained to our IT department multiple times, and they made several attempts to fix it. I even let my son take a look at it while I was remoted into it from home (son also works in IT, but for a different entity). He laughed because the processor was 10+ years old. Finally, the IT department got a new guy, and I mentioned it to him. He jumped right in. After I left work one day, he swapped the HD for an SSD, and dropped in a bunch of memory. Now it’s a whole new computer. Moral of the story: regardless of the stability of newer Windows versions, more memory never hurts.
    Jason

    "Don't get stuck on stupid." --Lt. Gen. Russel Honore


  3. #33
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    More memory is a good thing, Jason. But that SSD is what really kicked things up a notch. Operating systems do a ton of storage access and old-time spinning platters just cannot keep up with that. I've personally experienced the rejuvenation thing on a couple of my own systems. It's really not about processing anymore for most common computer uses...it's about I/O.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
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    I worked for a very large "computer company" that use to have it's own brand of computers. They sold that division off so they had to source laptops from other companies. At first it was from the company that bought the computer division but in time it was buying them from the low bidder. Of course when it comes to computers "low bidder" means lower quality or speed parts. My last work laptop (about 4 years old now) had a HD in it when almost nobody was still using them. Turn it on was supper painful. I timed it at more than 7 minutes to get to the point where you could actually get on the internet. When they sold off our division the new company just laughed and replaced all those laptops with newer ones with SSDs. The IT guys let me keep that laptop since I had some custom software on it. I swapped out the HD for a SSD and made it actually useable. It amazes me that a company would save a few bucks on equipment yet not care about the fact that they are throwing away tons of money having employees sitting idle because that equipment is slow.

  5. #35
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    The round of PCs my employer purchased in late 2014 still came with HDs. Within a year or so of purchase we bought a whole pile of SSDs and started swapping the HDs with SSD. (We also put SSDs in laptops purchased in 2013.) It made a noticeable difference in performance. I occasionally would run into PCs that had not been upgraded with an SSD and were slow. By that point we were simply giving users a different PC that had an SSD installed with a new software image. We started replacing the 2013 laptops in 2018 and a number of them still had HDs that had not been replaced. The new laptops have SSDs of course. We still have a number of new SSDs in storage for PCs that never got SSDs before they got replaced.

    I can't believe there are still laptops and desktops shipped with HDs. If a new Windows PC still comes with an HD that is a sign it is a cheap low end PC that will likely never perform well and should be avoided. Although. I bought a Dell desktop PC in 2017 that was pretty high end that still had an HD. I bought an SSD and put it in before I ever used the PC. That PC performs just fine to this day.
    Last edited by Brian Elfert; 10-10-2021 at 6:04 PM.

  6. #36
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    Brian, I agree...even for the most basic usage, I wouldn't suggest anyone buy a computer that's still using spinning platter hard drives. They just cannot keep up with the I/O of current operating systems. And the prices of reasonably sized SSDs is pretty darn low these days, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Brian, I agree...even for the most basic usage, I wouldn't suggest anyone buy a computer that's still using spinning platter hard drives. They just cannot keep up with the I/O of current operating systems. And the prices of reasonably sized SSDs is pretty darn low these days, too.
    You can get a used 4TB SSD (Samsung) for about $100/TB. And with Crystal disk info you can see how many TB have been written to the disk. The Samsung SSDs have an amazing write specification.

    If the seller won't give you the Crystal Disk info, don't buy.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    More memory is a good thing, Jason. But that SSD is what really kicked things up a notch. Operating systems do a ton of storage access and old-time spinning platters just cannot keep up with that. I've personally experienced the rejuvenation thing on a couple of my own systems. It's really not about processing anymore for most common computer uses...it's about I/O.
    Yeah, I had told them it had something to do with the HD early on—when I would first log in, the computer would be virtually unusable for 5 minutes or so. During that time, the HD access light on the front of the CPU would be on solid, with only an occasional flicker. After those 5 minutes, it would go back to the occasional access and flicker/blip, but the computer was still slow, especially whenever I tried to do too much at once.

    Now, my 27” Mac at home..that has a hybrid drive in it, and I’ve noticed with each OS upgrade since I got it 3-ish years ago, it gets a little slower. But I think it only has 4 GB of memory, with room for a lot more—that may be a winter project if memory is cheap and available.
    Jason

    "Don't get stuck on stupid." --Lt. Gen. Russel Honore


  9. #39
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    I personally would not buy a used SSD when new ones are so cheap. It is very rare that anyone needs a 4TB SSD. I am still using a 250GB SSD, but I don't store a lot of data.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    I personally would not buy a used SSD when new ones are so cheap. It is very rare that anyone needs a 4TB SSD. I am still using a 250GB SSD, but I don't store a lot of data.
    Ah, I have two 4TB Samsung SSDs. I bought them used. If you check the write specifications on Samsung SSDs, you'll see that it takes a LOT of use to even reach the warrantee write count point. And they generally go well past that point before failure.

    It's essentially impossible for a home user to get to the warrantee write count. About the only application that will ever get to the warrantee write count is use in server farms.

    I simply mention all of this because (I feel) it's a fairly safe way to save some money if you use big SSDs. If you use small SSDs, the savings are not very large. A new 250GB Samsung SSD is about $50-65 today.

    If you buy a used SSD, make sure to get the write count which can be obtained with Crystal Disk Info or Samsung Magician (if the SSD is a Samsung).

    Mike

    [I just looked it up. The specifications on the Samsung 860 4TB SSD is 2,400 TB written. The one I have in the machine I'm working on now has 37 TB written and I've had this SSD in this machine for a couple to three years now. I'll never even get close the 2,400 TBW. The 250GB SSD is warranted for 150 TBW.]
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 10-11-2021 at 2:47 PM.
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  11. #41
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    I have a large, I think 2TB SSD connected to my Dish Network receiver. I could easily fill it up. The old HD died after a few months even though it was rated for use in a DVR. I think the motor inside it went or it overheated. Not a lot of people need that much space but there are lots of uses where large amounts of data are normal.

  12. #42
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    I did a check for updates on my home desktop PC Saturday night, and it said that Windows 11 was not compatible. There was a link to the Microsoft Health Check app, so I downloaded and ran it. It told me that my machine lacked a TPM. After a BIOS update to my motherboard and a quick Google search on Firmware TPM, I had the firmware TPM provided by the processor enabled. My machine then passed the health check in the app, but Windows Update still said that the machine was incompatible and would not offer Windows 11 as an update. I decided to wait a couple of days and see if that changes, so I will check again tonight and see if I'm able to update now.

    My desktop is an Intel i9-9900K on an Asus Prime Z390A motherboard, with 64Gb of RAM, a 1Tb Samsung NVMe SSD and a Western Digital 4Tb black hard drive for data. I built it a couple of years ago so I won't be replacing it anytime soon. If it will upgrade to Windows 11 I will, if not, then I will wait until I build a new machine to get 11.

  13. #43
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    Derek, you should see a change to the note in Windows Update in a future session after one or more new updates are installed and a reboot occurs. That's how it worked in my Parallels VM this week. The "not compatible" message stuck until I did the next Win10 update and then it cleared. (I had enabled the emulated TPM feature in Parallels and was in the same situation as you)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #44
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    This is a late follow-up, but I upgraded one of my computers to Windows 11 and found that it's not much different from Windows 10. Seems to work fine with all of my software.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  15. #45
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    I plan to hold off on Windows 11 at least until it gets the first big update to take care of the teething problems with any new OS. My 10 year old laptop still runs Windows 10 just fine, but it may never qualify for Windows 11. My 2017 desktop is more likely to qualify and the desktop is what I use most of the time anyhow. I have two 27" monitors connected to my desktop.

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