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Thread: Windows 11

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    I haven't used it a lot, but I don't find Windows 11 to be that difficult to get accustom to. From what I understand, it provides enhanced security so I'm willing to adapt to the changes they made.

    However, I have two other computers that won't run Windows 11 so I'm going to be on Windows 10 for a while. They're good, powerful computers and I have no reason to purchase new ones.
    Exactly. My main desktop can run Win11, but I have no clue when that'll happen. It's not that hard to get used to, but switching back and forth between 10 and 11 reminded me of my sporadic attempts to use Linux. I can do it but it's just not worth the aggravation until I can do it on all the machines...I suspect I'll wait until my next hardware refresh cycle.
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    Not exactly.....first you have to add the app to start, then open the app and right click on the icon to select that it is added to the task bar. Some apps seem to do this automatically others not so much. Microsoft wants you to stay strictly with their approved apps from their store, which has a very limited selection of apps other than social media.
    My bad...I meant to say 'start the app' prior to the right click operation. BTW, I use that technique on MacOS, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #78
    I have just completed 3 installs of Windows 11 Pro on three Intel NUCs (10th gen i7 machines). Here is what I have found so far:

    1. The install process is pretty much identical to the Windows 10 install, except that some screens have nicer graphics. Boot times (power on to login screen) seem a bit faster.
    2. Hardware detection is better - Windows 11 had drivers for most hardware, including the wired network controller, which Windows 10 did not. This meant no connecting to wireless during install.
    3. If not connected to internet, I had the option to use a local account. If connected, choose Work or School account, then Domain Join, and it will allow you to create a local account.
    4. The update process was faster than Windows 10. There are fewer updates, of course, but they installed faster and with fewer errors.
    5. Having the start menu in the center is different, but not too bad.
    6. Changing the default web browser from Edge to Chrome is much more annoying. You now have to change it for each file type, of which there are about a dozen.
    7. Adobe does not have a Windows 11 selection when downloading Acrobat Reader. I chose Windows 10 and it installed and ran just fine.
    8. Text size is not consitent between menus. For example, right-clicking on the desktop brings up the context menu at a reasonably large font, but selecting 'Show More Options' brings up a menu with noticably smaller text.
    9. No issues with networking - seems to connect to all network resources just fine, and access is very fast.

    I've had no issues with any driver or program installs yet, but I have no exotic hardware and the programs I've installed so far are pretty run-of-the-mill. I'll know more when I start installing the industry-specific software we use on these machines, likely next week as I put them into production. I will then get user feedback on the whole Windows 11 experience as well.

    Derek

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    My bad...I meant to say 'start the app' prior to the right click operation. BTW, I use that technique on MacOS, too.
    What I was trying to say was you have to add the app to the start menu then actually open the app before you can see the option to add the app to the task bar.

    I still haven't figured out how to open a file that shows up on the recommended list. Apps shown there open, but not files.
    Lee Schierer
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  5. #80
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    I'll have to check that out when I do a Win11 install...debating on a clean VM or upgrading my Win10 VM for that. Probably the latter, honestly, as I can make a backup copy of the existing Win10 VM in about ten seconds.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Meyer View Post
    There is a media creation tool from Microsoft for Windows 11. Search for "Windows 11 Media Creation Tool". It was the first link that popped up for me.
    Windows Media Creation Tool only works on Windows machines. On any other OS it offers to download the .iso which works for me.

  7. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    What I was trying to say was you have to add the app to the start menu then actually open the app before you can see the option to add the app to the task bar.

    I still haven't figured out how to open a file that shows up on the recommended list. Apps shown there open, but not files.
    I looked at this, and it looks like, for Microsoft apps, you can add then to the task bar from by right-clicking on the icon on the Start menu, but not for third-party apps. I tried it on Office, Solitaire, and Calculator (actually, all the apps on my Start menu) and they all gave me the option to Pin to Task Bar. The third party apps, including the ones that came installed as part of Windows like Instagram and Spotify, do not have this option. I wonder if this is something they will address in a future update.

    I copied a file down from our network drive (a PDF) and opened it, closed it, clicked Start and saw that the file had been added to the Recommended list. When I clicked on it it opened right away. Could it be that you don't have an app associated with the type of file you're trying to open?

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    What I was trying to say was you have to add the app to the start menu then actually open the app before you can see the option to add the app to the task bar.

    I still haven't figured out how to open a file that shows up on the recommended list. Apps shown there open, but not files.
    Do you have something disabled in settings? I just tried opening a file in the "recommended" group on the start menu and it opened right up. When I mouse over it highlights it and when I click on it the file opens.

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Meyer View Post
    I looked at this, and it looks like, for Microsoft apps, you can add then to the task bar from by right-clicking on the icon on the Start menu, but not for third-party apps.
    That's odd: when I tried it, it worked for Quicken, Photoshop, and Chrome.
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  10. #85
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    On Windows 11 on my computer, I can right click on any program in the "All Apps" list and it will give me a "Pin to Start" option. Right under that "Pin to Start" option is a "More" option. If I click on that, I get an option of "Pin to Taskbar".

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    On Windows 11 on my computer, I can right click on any program in the "All Apps" list and it will give me a "Pin to Start" option. Right under that "Pin to Start" option is a "More" option. If I click on that, I get an option of "Pin to Taskbar".
    That pretty well sums up my objection to the (semi-)new UI: a lot of things I use constantly are one level deeper than they were in Win10. Very useful utilities like BulkRename and 7-Zip add entries to the Explorer context menus, but they end up in the normally-invisible "More..." overflow.

    If the user could rearrange/prioritize system/context menus, that problem would go away.
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  12. #87
    These recent posts sum up my utter contempt for computer design engineers who can't seem to see or think past their own egos, like for example, the clowns who thought that, because THEY thought it was a great idea to just do away with the START button (remember win8?), that EVERYONE would think it's a great idea!! **BBZZZTTT!!** FAIL!!!
    --Ok, so we'll fix everything with 8.1. Heavy sigh... banghead.gif

    Me, I still can't even figure out what is and isn't the dam scroll-bar in win10...
    ========================================
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  13. #88
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    Then again, those of us who don't have "start buttons" haven't missed them. I don't even use it on Windows except to get to the reboot/shutdown. And my screen is "clean" with only a dock/taskbar at the bottom. So I can understand why designers might do the things they do but I also appreciate that many don't like or are not comfortable when things change. Not much we individually can do about it...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    ...I also appreciate that many don't like or are not comfortable when things change.
    Could you dial back the condescension about 10dB? It's not "change" as such that's the problem, it's making things less convenient/intuitive/efficient for no apparent reason.

    Yeah, you can had-wave off the whole thing as "they moved my cheese" (as I myself described it earlier)...the problem is that they moved it further away.
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  15. #90
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    Microsoft desktop operating systems seem to alternate between bad and good. XP was good, Vista was bad, 7 was good, 8/8.1 were bad, 10 is good, and the jury is out on 11, but seems to be leaning towards bad.

    Part of it is just familiarity. We get used to where everything is and when it moves in the next version we get frustrated. I have been using Windows 10 for at least four or five years. The rare times I have to use an old Windows XP or 7 PC I have to think for a minute where stuff is in the old version.

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