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Thread: From an outbuilding woodshop to a basement. The journey begins.....

  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Lancaster, Ohio
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    888
    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford McGuire View Post
    Thanks for all the feedback everyone. Much of it has to do with an outside entrance. Interesting suggestions about a below-grade doorway. It would be quite a project, those windows are in a window well that extends 2 ft above them. So, the yard is graded about the same as the basement ceiling. My long term plan was a sunken patio that would bring the grade down a few feet. Enough to get more daylight to the windows and possibly send long boards into the shop. But I'll keep the door entrance in mind.
    Replace the window with a casement if it can crank wide open or a double hung with removable sash. You will be surprised at how much stuff you can move thru the windows.
    I have two windows that I added after regrading outside, one window gets removed to move items in. 4x8 drywall, tool boxes, gang boxes, 14' lumber, etc.
    Some items do have to go down stairway, 18" bandsaw, SawStop ICS, shaper, small panel saw, etc.
    All depends on weather and how much needs to get moved in. One day spent adding two windows has saved so much time and added so much light to a dark basement.
    Ron

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    58,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford McGuire View Post
    I was thinking about changing to the 55 gallon drum, but if I put it under the soffit, it would be a tight fit.
    If there is any way you can accommodate the larger drum...do it! You can fill a drum very quickly when processing lumber with the jointer and planer. Really fast. On second thought...you're in the basement and need to get the stuff outside by going up stairs. Maybe the 35 gallon is more practical in that respect. BTW, you can buy 55 gallon bags that will fit in either drum from Amazon for a whole lot less than buying the bags from Oneida. Major a while lot less...I just got a box because I unfortunately have to bag here at our new property. They are big enough around to properly fill the drum...and don't forget you need the thin plastic accessory to hold the bag open while the cyclone is filling it with dust.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    On second thought...you're in the basement and need to get the stuff outside by going up stairs. Maybe the 35 gallon is more practical in that respect.
    Right, headroom and hauling it out of the basement were the main considerations.

    I've decided to go with 6" PVC for the main ductwork runs. I found a Lowes that carried 6" PVC (many big box stores don't) and I bought all the elbows, couplers, and wyes they had.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,980
    You should open up that return air duct and install a HEPA filter at least double the size of the current grill.

    A pair of sawhorses and a circular saw will let you rough cut materials outside. Big box stores will make pretty good cuts for you at the store. Put the scms on the curb and find a workaround to open up that space.

    It might be time to give up making kitchen cabinets and focus on smaller projects.

    You are going to like the added headroom. Keep your ductwork high and out of the center of the shop. When you want more light (cans can be harsh and shadowy) add 4' fixtures around the perimeter. A separate switch would be good.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    You should open up that return air duct and install a HEPA filter at least double the size of the current grill.

    A pair of sawhorses and a circular saw will let you rough cut materials outside. Big box stores will make pretty good cuts for you at the store. Put the scms on the curb and find a workaround to open up that space.

    It might be time to give up making kitchen cabinets and focus on smaller projects.

    You are going to like the added headroom. Keep your ductwork high and out of the center of the shop. When you want more light (cans can be harsh and shadowy) add 4' fixtures around the perimeter. A separate switch would be good.
    Thanks Tom. I was wondering if I should just block off the air return duct??????

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford McGuire View Post
    Thanks Tom. I was wondering if I should just block off the air return duct??????
    Blocking it could affect the balance of the system. At the very least you need to double or triple filter it. You may want to talk with the folks you use to service your HVAC system to get their input on how best to handle things. This is one of the real challenges with having a workshop "inside" of one's home.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #22
    A floor appears! As mentioned above, I decided to go with Dricore. It went so quick. I pallet of 122 tiles (22in x 22in) arrived, and I started carrying them downstairs. I think they weight about 7 lbs each.

    I started laying them down and it went so quick, that I forgot to take progress pictures. In a few hours, it was done.

    I'll be using the Varathane Oil Based floor finish. I've used that in my other house for wood floors and have been happy. While drying, it smells so much worse than water based, but I'm happy to have the extra durability.

    PXL_20211011_121158084 (1).jpg

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Very nice. The Minwax Oil Modified product is a waterborne emulsified oil product. Looks like oil based. Wears really well. Drys fast enough to do two coats per day. No oil based smell, too. Available from Sherwin Williams and many other places that sell Minwax products.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    OK, the floor is in and sealed. Next up, dust collection.

    My current shop is a standalone 1.5 car garage that has a Penn State collector connected to the table saw. That's it. So, I really want to up my game this time.

    After reading reviews and watching videos, I choose the Onieda v3000 dust collector. I also decided to run 6" pvc as close to the tools as possible. That stuff isn't easy to find. No HD's near me carried 6" and only one of the Lowes in my area had it. I only have my Ford Edge out here (most of my stuff, including my pickup truck are still back in the midwest.) I bought four 10 ft pieces of 6" pvc and cut them to fit in the car. I also bought a selection of elbows, couplers, and wyes.

    OK, here's where you'll think I've gone off the rails. I'm painting the pvc to match the color of my walls/ceiling. Why? Here are a couple reasons:

    1) We already have the paint. The previous owner left an almost-full gallon.

    2) I watched/read enough to believe that paint will adhere to pvc, if properly prepped. So, I wiped the pieces down with acetone and scuffed them with sandpaper to remove shine. Then I painted two coats of a primer recommended for pvc. Then two coats of paint.

    3) I've got the time. My tools won't be delivered for a month or so. What else am I going to do?

    4) My previous shop wasn't very enjoyable to be in. It was an unheated (actually just wood siding over studs), dark, smelly, cold (winter) or hot/humid (summer) building that I shared with the mice and occasional raccoon. I want to make this workspace a pleasure to be in.

    5) With 10 foot ceilings, I won't worry about too many things hitting the pipes and chipping paint off. But if I do, and it really bothers me, I 'll occasionally touch it up.

    Here's a picture during the priming. Note: The dozen boxes that the Onieda comes in makes for decent painting surfaces, in a pinch.

    PXL_20211012_131400626.jpg


    And here they are after painting.

    PXL_20211015_115821761.jpg

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    There is absolutely zero problem with painting the duct work to make it more aesthetically pleasing to you...it's a subjective thing...especially in a small shop environment. That duct work will be "in your face" to a certain extent, so making it look nice is perfectly fine. IMHO. Some folks have to use a mix of white and green SD pipe and that would drive me nuts to a great extent and I can assure you there's no question that I would paint it!

    That said, I use metal duct and don't mind the look. Everyone should do what pleases them the most for things like this.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    There is absolutely zero problem with painting the duct work to make it more aesthetically pleasing to you...it's a subjective thing...especially in a small shop environment. That duct work will be "in your face" to a certain extent, so making it look nice is perfectly fine. IMHO. Some folks have to use a mix of white and green SD pipe and that would drive me nuts to a great extent and I can assure you there's no question that I would paint it!

    That said, I use metal duct and don't mind the look. Everyone should do what pleases them the most for things like this.
    Thanks Jim. I looked at dozens of YouTube shop tours and many more online pics and didn't see any painted pvc. But I'm liking the look.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    You are correct, most folks don't paint the duct work.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #28
    Alright, the first section is up. I started by piecing it together on the ground.

    PXL_20211015_123859470.jpg


    I made two of these to help with the lift. (6" Charlotte pvc is heavy!). They have three positions, so I can hoist them up 'gradually'. (Keep in mind that the only power tool I have is a borrowed Skil saw. Oh, and a 12V cordless drill.)

    PXL_20211028_122556042.jpg



    So, here is the first section, with some help from my daughter. This is the largest section to lift at once, but I didn't want to mess with corners close to the ceiling. You need a couple inches of room to slip the pieces over the pipes.

    I didn't use any 90 degree elbows. Instead, I would use 2 45's, and a few inches of pipe between them.

    PXL_20211017_135816817.MP.jpg



    To secure the pipe, I'm using the 3/4" 22 gauge metal straps. The package says they are good for 40 lbs. But I saw a suggestion to double the straps for extra support. I double screw the straps into the wooden ceiling joists. It sure feels secure.

    PXL_20211028_011351518.jpg



    PXL_20211028_122434421.jpg


    Thanks for looking!

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Is that the lighter Sewer and Drain pipe or heavy Schedule 40?? Most folks use the former for dust collection.

    Nice job on the installation.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Is that the lighter Sewer and Drain pipe or heavy Schedule 40?? Most folks use the former for dust collection.

    Nice job on the installation.
    It's the heavier, schedule 40 stuff. I couldn't find the lighter sewer pipe in 6" anywhere near me. It's a good workout to install!

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