Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 21 of 21

Thread: Do you burnish your scraper?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    11,156
    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weber View Post
    Keep in mind that the burr created by the grinder is weaker than the burr created by burnishing.
    A burnished burr is considered to be work hardened and therefore much stronger.
    A burr created by the grinder is much quicker to create/restore and is usually turners need.
    YMMV
    Just compare the grinder burr to the burnished burr under a microscope. The grinder burr looks like a ragged and fragile edge while the burnished burr looks more like a smooth knife edge.

    I've used both and almost always take the few extra seconds to hone off the grinder burr and add a burnished burr. The times I used the grinder burr I used CBN wheels from 80 to 600. 600 worked the best for me but none lasted as long as the burnished burr. The two do have a bit different "feel" in use.

    Also, don't remember if I mentioned this earlier but when a burnished burr starts to get dull, I generally refresh it at least once with the diamond hone and burnisher before returning for a pass on the 600 grit CBN wheel.

    JKJ

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I bought one of those burnishers years ago. I used it on a variety of scrapers including some that were very large.

    That burnishing tool can be very aggressive because of the leverage the pin at the rear gives you. It can easily create a burr that is much too large to be useful. When used gently, it's fine.

    I quit using the thing at least 10 years ago and instead use burnish with hand tools. I started with a fairly large diameter carbide rod then went to a smaller rod. I like the small one better.

    Attachment 465482

    My favorite burnisher now is made by Arno, has a round rod on one side and a triangle on the other side. The triangle actually as a small radius on the working edge rather than a sharp edge so it really works like a small diameter rod. The triangle is more aggressive than the round rod. Sorry, I can't find a pic of the Arno.

    I use the hand burnishers for scrapers, negative rake scrapers, and hand scrapers.

    JKJ
    You turned me on to that one and it works great!20211012_130508.jpg

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    11,156
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Mattsen View Post
    You turned me on to that one and it works great!20211012_130508.jpg
    I'm glad you like it.
    While searching for Arno recently I came across their knife sharpener which is made just like the burnisher except for different carbide inserts - one for removing metal from the knife edge and the other for smoothing the edge. I find it works great when I'm in a hurry and don't want to get out the sharpening machine!

    https://www.amazon.com/Arno-Carbcut-.../dp/B07J17DMKS

    JKJ

  4. #19
    Agate burnishers were used by many old timers and considered the best. Dulled carbide laminate bits also work well.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Just compare the grinder burr to the burnished burr under a microscope. The grinder burr looks like a ragged and fragile edge while the burnished burr looks more like a smooth knife edge.

    I've used both and almost always take the few extra seconds to hone off the grinder burr and add a burnished burr. The times I used the grinder burr I used CBN wheels from 80 to 600. 600 worked the best for me but none lasted as long as the burnished burr. The two do have a bit different "feel" in use.

    Also, don't remember if I mentioned this earlier but when a burnished burr starts to get dull, I generally refresh it at least once with the diamond hone and burnisher before returning for a pass on the 600 grit CBN wheel.

    JKJ
    You prefer the 600 grit wheel for your scrapers? I've mainly been using my 180 grit for flat style tools and the 600 for gouges, in part just to leave them set up for most common tasks...

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    11,156

    Setting grinding angles

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Mattsen View Post
    You prefer the 600 grit wheel for your scrapers? I've mainly been using my 180 grit for flat style tools and the 600 for gouges, in part just to leave them set up for most common tasks...
    Yes, and I made some gages from plexiglas to very quickly set the wolverine platform for my most common angles for NRS, skew, hand scraper, etc.

    _scrapers_IMG_7811.jpg

    Since this picture, I started spray painting all of these on one side to make them easier to see and read. This one is for grinding a thin hand scraper at 90-deg. The 3rd pic is honing the edge flat before burnishing.

    template_angle_IMG_7898.jpg scraper_CBN_IMG_7894.jpg scraper_honing_1_IMG_7884.jpg

    This one is for my curved NRS ground at 60-deg, usable either left or right depending on which side I burnish the burr.

    NRS_IMG_7907.jpg NRS_IMG_7778.jpg NRS_IMG_7515.jpg

    I use a wolverine varigrind (not varigrind 2) for the bowl gouges, the tormek 1200grit CBN for the spindle gouges.

    JKJ

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •