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Thread: Fay & Egan 36" bandsaw vs Frank Jones 36"

  1. #1
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    Fay & Egan 36" bandsaw vs Frank Jones 36"

    Which of these two band saws is the better machine? - aside from issues from wear and tear either might have?

    One is a Fay & Egan 36" 950 lightening band saw, the other is a Frank Jones B-36".

    I will potentially have a need for a good amount of re-saw height in a saw, and I don't want to / cannot spring for a nice new Northfield or Euro saw.
    I also like the romance of older machines, but I am willing to be talked out of that foolishness.

    EDIT: the F&E has 21 1/2" under the upper guide, the Frank Jones has 14 3/4" under the guide.

    The Frank Jones saw is local to me, the Fay & Egan is a six hour drive away.

    Here's a photo of each one - F&E first, then the Frank Jones.


    Fay Egan 36%22.jpg Rodgers 36%22.jpg

    The prices are not bad, and honestly I'm guessing the sellers would likely come down more as they probably want these machines gone. But then comes the transporting, and the myriad issues with tires, guides, motors that older machines bring.
    So I'm open to all sorts of advice here, even if it's just to learn more about these beautiful looking machines.

    Lastly, how do either stack up against the Tannewitz 36", which seems to be an icon in this field.
    Last edited by Mark Gibney; 09-25-2021 at 12:09 PM. Reason: new information

  2. #2
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    Mark I have zero knowledge on these old cast iron saws. But dang they sure look cool. The impressive thing for me is the massive throat depth and the possibilities that provides for cutting huge work pieces. The second thing that hit me is how much fun it would be to move one of those saws, all that cast iron is going to be HEAVY.. Good luck.

  3. #3
    how much under the guides to the table on each, here are some specs on 30" and 36" in Wadkin for some info. Only saw one Tannewitz and an auction and it look like great quality.

    Capture.JPG
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 09-25-2021 at 1:56 PM.

  4. #4
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    I would first look at the size of the motor and decide if my service could start the bandsaw. In my residence 5hp is max after that the lights dim in my house and my neighbors down stream.
    I have a b20/20 Euro motor almost 5hp it pulls 70amps for a few seconds. Itís only a 20 inch wheel
    Aj

  5. #5
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    Ball or babbit bearings? I think F@E was gone before ball bearings really took off.
    Bill. D

  6. #6
    I've never heard of Frank Jones. Just based off that I'd probably lean towards Fay & Egan myself. It also seems to have more resaw height.

  7. #7
    here is the plate on this one. RPM typed on the plate lower than the manual.
    P1150674A.jpg
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 09-25-2021 at 4:41 PM.

  8. #8
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    Just thought I'd point out the obvious - that nameplate indicates 575 VAC. I'm guessing you realize it is 3 phase but that isn't a typical voltage available in the US. I think Canada may have it. You can always get a transformer or new motor.

  9. #9
    575 is correct.

    What I wondered about the manual listed RPM at 750 yet the plate says 575 same as the voltage so logic thought did they type the RPM wrong by accident. I think I had been told there was two RPM's and try and get the slower one.

  10. #10
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    Hi Warren, I don't understand what bandsaw motor that nameplate is on?

    If the motor won't work for my situation I may pass on a machine.

  11. #11
    If that F&E is even an option.... GO GET IT! Monster of a saw. But make sure you're comfortable handling and transporting something that size. Even if it needs tires (which can be expensive) and a few small parts, it'll be worth it. I'd love to have one, but the 9 foot height kind of has me over a barrel.

    Seriously, both of those are big saws and they're heavy and they can be tippy if you lean them wrong. Make sure you work out your logistics before going to get one. 6 hours is no big deal. Uhaul trailer and you're out and back in a day.

    To your point about a Tannewitz, those tend to run fast in terms of blade speed, but really, with what you're looking at between these two and a Tanny.... You're almost at a Ford/Chevy/Ram stage. They all have far more capability than most people will ever fully utilize.

  12. #12
    Adding on to cover the rest of your questions... Guides can be replaced or rebuilt, but many of the stock guides on that class of machine are as good as or better than anything you'll get today.

    For the motors, 3 phase is no big deal, but watch out for a non-dual voltage motor that's 440v only. (Or 575v to Warren's point.) If it's a direct drive saw, that adds a layer of complexity as you don't have as many options. You can add a transformer, but that's something else you've got to get comfortable with. Most were 3-5 hp, but there were certainly 7.5's and 10 hp models out there. Check your power requirements as compared to your panel, especially if you're running a converter.

    If either of these saws happen to have them, babbitt bearings aren't the devil, especially on a bandsaw that size. Those shaft RPM's aren't anything to worry about, usually way lower than a jointer, etc. so they're easy to work with. Do some homework and go in with your eyes open, but after you get either of those running, you won't regret it.

  13. #13
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    Warren, I wonder if the rpm is based on 50/60 Hz difference? How do you power that motor, transformer?
    Bill D.

  14. #14
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    As per all the bandsaw moving stories remove the table first. Do not break the irreplaceable trunnions.
    Bill D
    I had this picture from somewhere floating around on my computer.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 09-26-2021 at 9:46 PM.

  15. #15
    The saw is 60HZ. 10 Roto and 30KVA transformer. Jack Forsberg sent me a detailed explain on speed and why and more for the Wadkin, ill have to read several times to sink in. Besides having the woodwork thing down he really understands the technical stuff very well. Ill ask if hes okay with me posting it. Its very detailed, you will know its not me right away

    The height of the saw and moving was a concern. Didnt see standing 8' 6" up on a car trailer The last owner ticked off as I wanted to take it apart and lay it down. It was more work at both ends but felt safer for a six hour drive.

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