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Thread: Legacy saw blades. Keep or discard?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    3

    Legacy saw blades. Keep or discard?

    Hi everyone. LONG time lurker here.

    I bought my Craftsman 113 saw about 1983. I used it for lumber cutting and simple items around the house for several years. Since about 1998, I had it in my garage but had stopped using it for much as it was so under powered and frankly sucked. I had bought a Rigid portable and it sufficed for the general lumber and flooring needs that I had.

    Staring about 2 years ago, I figured I would like to make some cabinets. Not having the cash for a major outlay, I started a sloooow refurbishment process on the saw that I just finished. I had added the Exacti-Rip fence sometime in the 90's. I now have it working beautifully and accuracy down to 2-3 thousandths max, repeatable.

    Anyway, I bought some new blades but I was wondering if the old blades are worth keeping for any reason or just discard them as old tech. I have a sharpener for them and kept them sharp. Here is the list.

    Brand New blades (modern)

    Diablo 52 combination
    Diablo 24 tooth ripping blade
    Diablo 92 ultimate polished finished blade
    Freud industrial heavy duty rip 24 tooth 1/8 inch kerf
    Oshlund stack Dado 6 in


    Legacy new
    Vermont American hollow ground planer
    Oldham osb- plywood 20 tooth

    Legacy used

    Chrome King Master combination 64 tooth **
    Craftsman 44 tooth standard combination chrome edge **
    Black & Decker contractors chrome fast cut combination
    Craftsman cabinet combination 72 tooth **
    Vermont American plywood and paneling **
    Black & Decker chrome plated hollow ground planer **
    Craftsman industrial 50 tooth combination carbide **
    Craftsman 6-in wobble Dado (just old)

    ** - excellent condition

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    Last edited by Bion Rogers; 09-21-2021 at 9:38 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    3
    Just for the heck of it ( yeah i show off) This is the saw. New 2 hp 240V motor, AX belt, pulleys, arbor bearings, arbor face ground to 2/10ths, saw PALS, new Kreg miter gauge, new custom switch, Craftsman dust chute installed that I have had for ages., New GRR-RIPPER 3D advanced pushblock. The saw is now accurate as all hell for what it is and much better power.


    table saw 1.jpg

    table saw 2.jpg
    Last edited by Bion Rogers; 09-21-2021 at 11:24 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Corcoran, MN
    Posts
    230
    That saw is prideworthy. It is yours,​ reflecting effort and precision.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    58,163
    Unless there's something unique about an old blade that might provide some advantage/benefit, such as an unusual kerf width, etc., I personally wouldn't keep them around. Recycle them.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
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    Given that great cut quality & long life of carbide blades, I'd toss the old ones.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
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    1,906
    Are those older blades carbide tipped or just steel ? If they are carbide I would definitely keep them. I have a couple craftsman blades from the 80's that my Dad gave me that are actually very good quality. If they are just steel then keep one for cutting questionable material (possibility of nails).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    3
    Thanks, guys. Of the legacy blades, only the Craftsman industrial 50 tooth combination and the
    Craftsman 6-in wobble Dado are carbide.

    I'll put the others out for scrappers to pick up.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Dana, Masachusetts
    Posts
    282
    I keep the junk blades around for situations where a sawblade has to take one for the team. I ask for volunteers, and pick the blade that has "NAILS" written on it.

    For example, I had to trim window sash for a restoration. The sash had nails in them. Another is construction lumber with sand on it. Plywood that has been on the ground. Primed wood. Etc.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,381
    Quote Originally Posted by Bion Rogers View Post
    Thanks, guys. Of the legacy blades, only the Craftsman industrial 50 tooth combination and the
    Craftsman 6-in wobble Dado are carbide.

    I'll put the others out for scrappers to pick up.
    I'd add the wobble dado to the scrap pile too. New dado stacks are so much better in almost all ways, especially cutting veneered goods.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,395
    You say they are all sharp. I would use them until they need to be resharpened then toss them.
    Bill D

  11. #11
    Did I miss something? When did steel blades stop cutting wood? I'd sharpen them and use them for when cut quality really mattered. Steel can be sharpened to a much finer edge then carbide.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    4,934
    I found one use for the wobble dado blades. I made a bunch of melamine shelving and cabinets for closets and pantry in our house. I used a wobble blade to make the dados, because particle board/melamine is really hard on blades, and I was not about to use my Forrest dado set on it.

    There was a slight chip out using it, but acceptable for where it was going.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

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