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Thread: from carpet to wood stairs, looks nice but squeaky like crazy?

  1. #16
    On average 4 or 5 shims per tread. I tried to spread them out and applied glue under the shims and on the shims(so them won't move around).

    Quote Originally Posted by Jared Sankovich View Post
    You mentioned shims. How many per tread and where are they located? I'm inclined to think the new tread flexing and causing movement between the new tread, old tread, shims and skirtboards.

  2. #17
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    Try a puff of baby powder where each tread meets the skirt board. If that's the source of the squeak the powder may work itself into the joint and help reduce the noise.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Calver View Post
    Try a puff of baby powder where each tread meets the skirt board. If that's the source of the squeak the powder may work itself into the joint and help reduce the noise.
    Avoid Johnson & Johnson baby powder (now with Asbestos!)

  4. #19
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    In the town I live in the building inspector was firm that every rise had to be within 1/8" and that included top and bottom. Worse thing was this was for an outdoor flag stone set of steps and it took a bunch of work to get the steps to pass inspection (the second time, failed the 1st time)

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Gon View Post
    Thanks, I just went under the stairs and pushed and pulled the two stringer boards, and the stairs squeaks while I was doing that. Does that indicate anything?


    It sounds like some more screws are needed and since you can do things from below, you can not only reinforce the connection between the original treads and the stringers, but if you do some math, you can use fasteners to also catch the new, overlay treads from below without penetrating, and lock them in tighter than the adhesive ever will.
    --

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  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Gon View Post
    hmmm, I have seen some modern stairs which have square nose.

    On the other hand, will it be possible to dismantle the new treads while the PL300 has already set?
    I've never seen anything about code requiring a bullnose, but just from a comfort point of view, it makes my feet hurt just looking at those square edges. Even a 1/4" radius would make a tremendous difference.

    If the PL is smeared all over the underside of the treads, I don't know if they could be removed without destroying them.

  7. #22
    I checked the building code, it says this


    "As for stair treads the depth should not be less than 10 inches however this will require nosing projections. To avoid having to install nosing the code requires the depth of the tread to be no less than 11 inches. Nosing that is beveled should not exceed inch or the radius of curvature not more than 9/16 inch. The projection of nosing shall not be more than 1 inches and no less than inch. Again the tolerance of treads or nosing should be no more than ⅜ inch"


    and here is a diagram
    https://buildingcodetrainer.com/wp-c...h-1024x828.jpg

    None of the stairs in my house meets this requirement. especially on this one >>>"As for stair treads the depth should not be less than 10 inches however this will require nosing projections", with the nosing projection all my treads depth are all less than 10'. All the treads are 10' now, minus the 1 nosing projection from the back, I only got 9'

    In this case, if I want to meet the code, i will need to tear down everything, not just the old risers and treads, but the whole structure and start from zero.


    Quote Originally Posted by Donald G. Burns View Post
    In the town I live in the building inspector was firm that every rise had to be within 1/8" and that included top and bottom. Worse thing was this was for an outdoor flag stone set of steps and it took a bunch of work to get the steps to pass inspection (the second time, failed the 1st time)

  8. #23
    I tested on one tread and put in 10 screws last night, does not seem to help, maybe I need to do them all,

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    It sounds like some more screws are needed and since you can do things from below, you can not only reinforce the connection between the original treads and the stringers, but if you do some math, you can use fasteners to also catch the new, overlay treads from below without penetrating, and lock them in tighter than the adhesive ever will.

  9. #24
    It bothers me that you could move the stringers enough to get the stairs to squeek. Can you tell what it is made from? I took a staircase out of my house that has 2x10 stringers. They did not allow sufficient wood beneith the cuts for the treads and risers (IMHO). The staircase other issues, all rises were at least 8 inches (to high for local code) and two were over 10 inches. So I tore it all out and cut new stringers. It meets code now.

    My stringers were nailed to the studs through a 2x4. That allowed drywall to be easily slid behind the stringers but still allowed the stringers to be firmly nailed to the studs. I liked that construction and repeated it on my replacement. My stringer did not need support from the studs but why not?

    If you can, I would screw or nail the stringers to all the studs you can. It will stiffen then and should eliminate any ability to shift them manually. Screws would be easily removed if you have to tear it out. I would definitely try a few things first.

    Many years ago I tore the carpet off a staircase in our house at the time. This is more than 20 years ago. We wanted oak. But the existing treads were framing lumber. Sturdy but unattractive. I used 3/8 inch thick solid oak flooring on the treads. I ripped the nosing of the softwood treads off and made an Oak nosing molding that I then fastened to the remaining part of the softwood tread. It was an inch thick so it could be half round on top and bottom. On the bottom, I added a cove molding to hide the gap. The flooring was just nailed through the tongues to the softwood treads. We thought it looked nice and it did not squeak. I put the same flooring in the upstairs hallway to help the rises match. You used thicker oak which is better in some ways but could complicate having consistent rises. Otherwise I do not see how it would hurt. Maybe something from this will be an idea for you.

    I would start with eliminating all movement of the stringers. If you still have squeaks, you might try cutting a tread 1/16 short so there is a fine gap at the skirt. You can fill that with caulk. Doing a step or two this way could help you evaluate the treads moving on the skirts as a possible source of squeaks. Sometimes I think modern staircases have painted skirts and risers just so the joinery doesn't have to be as precise.

  10. #25
    Thanks, is there a good way to cut the already glued tread now on both ends without making it look like someone bites the edges off?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    It bothers me that you could move the stringers enough to get the stairs to squeek. Can you tell what it is made from? I took a staircase out of my house that has 2x10 stringers. They did not allow sufficient wood beneith the cuts for the treads and risers (IMHO). The staircase other issues, all rises were at least 8 inches (to high for local code) and two were over 10 inches. So I tore it all out and cut new stringers. It meets code now.

    My stringers were nailed to the studs through a 2x4. That allowed drywall to be easily slid behind the stringers but still allowed the stringers to be firmly nailed to the studs. I liked that construction and repeated it on my replacement. My stringer did not need support from the studs but why not?

    If you can, I would screw or nail the stringers to all the studs you can. It will stiffen then and should eliminate any ability to shift them manually. Screws would be easily removed if you have to tear it out. I would definitely try a few things first.

    Many years ago I tore the carpet off a staircase in our house at the time. This is more than 20 years ago. We wanted oak. But the existing treads were framing lumber. Sturdy but unattractive. I used 3/8 inch thick solid oak flooring on the treads. I ripped the nosing of the softwood treads off and made an Oak nosing molding that I then fastened to the remaining part of the softwood tread. It was an inch thick so it could be half round on top and bottom. On the bottom, I added a cove molding to hide the gap. The flooring was just nailed through the tongues to the softwood treads. We thought it looked nice and it did not squeak. I put the same flooring in the upstairs hallway to help the rises match. You used thicker oak which is better in some ways but could complicate having consistent rises. Otherwise I do not see how it would hurt. Maybe something from this will be an idea for you.

    I would start with eliminating all movement of the stringers. If you still have squeaks, you might try cutting a tread 1/16 short so there is a fine gap at the skirt. You can fill that with caulk. Doing a step or two this way could help you evaluate the treads moving on the skirts as a possible source of squeaks. Sometimes I think modern staircases have painted skirts and risers just so the joinery doesn't have to be as precise.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Jared Sankovich View Post
    Bullnose is not required, Code specifies a 9/16 maximum radius. There is no minimum.

    2018 IRC
    Attachment 464876
    I stand corrected. Any idea why they specify a maximum radius? I'm sure there's a reason, but the logic eludes me.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    I stand corrected. Any idea why they specify a maximum radius? I'm sure there's a reason, but the logic eludes me.
    A large radius would effectively shorten the depth of the tread. A 45 degree bevel is also called out, but limited to 1/2" for the same reason.

  13. #28
    A 10 foot radius would look too much like a straight line !

  14. #29
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    Despite the language in the code, I think you are just fine because it's an existing staircase. You can't "stretch it" and you're just refacing it to look modern. As long as the rise/run is consistent, it should likely be just fine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
    Yes. But it will take awhile. You could put a piece of painters tape on the skirt to protect it and then use a flush cut saw to cut off the end of the tread. That would make a very fine cut but give you clearance. You could also use a oscillating saw but it will be more difficult to avoid damaging the tread or the skirt. The cut will also be wider but still caulkable.

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