Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: Is this cutting board a wood movement problem?

  1. #1

    Is this cutting board a wood movement problem?

    A friend of mine sent me a link to these tony cutting boards made by the owner of Taylor guitars under the brand Stella Falone. At first glance, it looked to me like there could be a wood movement problem judging from the thickness of the outer Ebony layers and the (supposedly) solid Mahogany core.
    And they're laid up cross grain. But then I notice the Mahogany is mostly quarter sawn so maybe there would be minimal movement. What do you think?

    I remember back in the day there used to be a type of plywood called lumber core where the core was edge glued lumber strips. So maybe this cutting board is based on the same principle just with thicker outer veneers?

    For the largest size of these things (22"x18"x1.6") they're charging $479. Obviously aimed at a high end market.


    61vZ6sSNMjL._AC_SL1024_.jpg
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 09-15-2021 at 4:30 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,505
    I see hundreds of cutting boards at places like Reddit. I'm amazed at the size of those things. Who needs a 1.6" thick slab to cut on? Same with the 22x18". Our favorite cutting board is 6x12". You can cut up a pork loin, or cut a sandwich in half. I don't want to lift a 25 pound cutting board to cut celery or a sandwich!!!! Who needs more than 1/2" thickness to cut a loaf of bread?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    7,657
    I think it will be fine, like lumber core plywood as you said. And they should last forever for what they are charging.

    John

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    58,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    I see hundreds of cutting boards at places like Reddit. I'm amazed at the size of those things. Who needs a 1.6" thick slab to cut on? Same with the 22x18". Our favorite cutting board is 6x12". You can cut up a pork loin, or cut a sandwich in half. I don't want to lift a 25 pound cutting board to cut celery or a sandwich!!!! Who needs more than 1/2" thickness to cut a loaf of bread?
    Purely a subjective thing, Richard. Functionally, you are correct...major thickness isn't required for general cutting. A heavier board does stay put better, however. And for end-grain designs, there's no getting away from a little thicker to accommodate better glue surfaces between the "blocks".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
    Posts
    511
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    I see hundreds of cutting boards at places like Reddit. I'm amazed at the size of those things. Who needs a 1.6" thick slab to cut on? Same with the 22x18". Our favorite cutting board is 6x12". You can cut up a pork loin, or cut a sandwich in half. I don't want to lift a 25 pound cutting board to cut celery or a sandwich!!!! Who needs more than 1/2" thickness to cut a loaf of bread?

    If you entertain and grill a lot big is good. I usually go 12x18 but that is super crowded with just 4 steaks. Agreed I wouldnt go for it to cut up 1 cucumber though.
    I have these for small stuff
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


    Assuming all grain is running in the same direction it should be good

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Purely a subjective thing, Richard. Functionally, you are correct...major thickness isn't required for general cutting. A heavier board does stay put better, however. And for end-grain designs, there's no getting away from a little thicker to accommodate better glue surfaces between the "blocks".
    Agree, it's totally subjective. In my case, I have a tendency to chop a lot of ingredients into little piles on the cutting board, and then hold it with one hand over my pot or pan and scrape the ingredients in with the knife in the other hand. This would not be easy at all if it were a monster thick board. I've known other chefs who portion their prep into monkey dishes in which case it doesn't matter. It depends on the way you cook.
    The big heavy boards do make a statement though.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by George Yetka View Post


    Assuming all grain is running in the same direction it should be good
    But here the grain is not running in the same direction. They've crossbanded the outer layers against the core.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
    Posts
    511
    I see I didnt realize. It still better than end/edge. Should be limited

  9. #9
    If it's built the way it looks, it's toast. It's going to move. The question is, what's going to give?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    58,285
    Relative to wood movement, those outer layers do not appear to be very thick, so that alone could help minimize wood movement challenges with the cross grain. In fact, aside from the cross grain, the item pictured is put together like many solid body guitars are built...a mahogany or sapele core and a .25" to .5" thick cap of figured material; sometimes only on the front and sometimes both sides, depending on the specific instrumenet.

    I really like that they are taking waste from their regular production and putting it to use rather than sending it to the landfill as many production operations might do.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    48
    That cutting board seem like a bad decision to me. Ebony is great for a knife handle, terrible for a knife edge, there's .5ish inch thick face grain waiting to get split by a cleaver, and $479?! Would work well as a fancy charcuterie board. Wood movement would be the least of my worries.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    3,013
    I think itís a waste of ebony and mahogany. A proper cutting board is maple with the grain vertical.
    Heres a look at the world famous cutting board with a pocket. Designed by the world famous woodworking artist me.
    What we have here is a meat side and a vegetable side. 2 for 1
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Aj

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    58,285
    One thing to consider...many "cutting boards" like this are not really "users". They are decorative by their nature and also great to use as serving pieces a la charcuterie. For actual prep work, I prefer a plain, sturdy maple board.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    7,657
    Seems some of you haven't learned about cross laminated timber yet. Well, now you have: https://www.apawood.org/cross-laminated-timber

    John

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2,789
    My experience in making cutting boards for friends is that end grain boards get used, face grain boards are "too pretty" and become decorative items. I've actually thought of making crappier designs to get them to be used, but gave up.

    Strange looking cutting board, though. Never seen one like that.
    - When God closes a door, he opens a window. Our heating bill is outrageous & six raccoons got in last night. Please God, this has to stop!
    - Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •