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Thread: 6-1/4 Circular Saw Regrets?

  1. #1
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    6-1/4 Circular Saw Regrets?

    In the market for a new circular saw to replace my 20+ year old Crapsman corded 7-1/4". Getting lose, deck is a bit bent up and cord sketchy.

    I "think" I can easily get by with a 6-1/4 vs the traditional 7-1/4" for almost any job I can think of and never miter with a circular saw (table saw or band saw). I have a heavy duty 7-1/4 worm drive for those thicker jobs.

    Any regrets over getting the smaller 6-1/4 saw from any who went that route?

  2. #2
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    Why stop at 6 1/4"? Take a look at the 5005BA 5 1/2" saw. Very light and handy and will crosscut a 2x, although it won't bevel deep enough for 2x stock. All in all a very handy saw. I've had one for years and probably use it more than my 7 1/4" saw.

  3. #3
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    I have an older 6 1/2" dewalt cordless and love it. I've even taken it to the sawmill and lumberyard to break down really long boards. Like you, I have a corded wormdrive for big jobs, but I don't drag it out unless the smaller saw just can't do the job. The dewalt has completely displaced my old corded porter cable 7 1/4 saw. The dewalt I have does cut slower than a corded saw, but I think the newer ones have improved that as battery tech has improved.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Cav View Post
    Why stop at 6 1/4"? Take a look at the 5005BA 5 1/2" saw. Very light and handy and will crosscut a 2x, although it won't bevel deep enough for 2x stock. All in all a very handy saw. I've had one for years and probably use it more than my 7 1/4" saw.
    Interesting but pretty pricey for a corded saw

  5. #5
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    I have a 7 1/4" & a 6 1/2" plunge (track) & a 5 1/2" cordless & a 3 3/8" Makita 12V cordless.

    I really do like the 5 1/2" cordless Makita 18V. Light - handy beyond words with no cord.

    The 12V 3 3/8" is too slow & under powered - well, underpowered & slow, only until you goof up & it takes of for points only known to it - then it's a rocket sled.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Franklin View Post
    I have an older 6 1/2" dewalt cordless and love it. I've even taken it to the sawmill and lumberyard to break down really long boards. Like you, I have a corded wormdrive for big jobs, but I don't drag it out unless the smaller saw just can't do the job. The dewalt has completely displaced my old corded porter cable 7 1/4 saw. The dewalt I have does cut slower than a corded saw, but I think the newer ones have improved that as battery tech has improved.
    I was thinking Dewalt too since that's what I have already. Some pros are telling me (another brand) is somewhat better but for my use the Dewalts are very good

  7. #7
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    I've been pleased with this:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1...3204/205076385

    Don't use it often and wish it had a port for dust collection, but no complaints. The new cordless version does have a dust port interestingly enough.

  8. #8
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    The battery powered circular saw I have is 6.25" and it's been fine for general utility. It will cut 2x stock fine as well as sheet goods for construction/renovation projects. I actually originally bought it so I would have a saw I could use at my storage rental if I go to collect material and don't want to take the trailer...I can cut things down to shorter lengths to fit in my SUV. I used it recently in support of the renovation I did on the shed in our backyard and have used it surprisingly a lot in the shop to break things down quickly for utility. (But I'm not using it for portable precision work...I have a track saw for that) My "legacy" circular saw from back in the 1980s is a an old, orange Black and Decker 7.25" saw and if I need to cut thick stuff and have power available, I'd grab that over the battery powered saw for sure, just as you would grab your worm-drive for the same reasons.

    BTW, the battery powered saw I have is actually the Bauer 20V from HFT as it uses the same batteries as other devices I have of that brand. It works fine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
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    I like my mini Porter Cable skill saw. But it is hard to find the 4.5" blades. It cuts just under 2" deep at 90 degrees which is enough for 2 x lumber and door bottoms.
    I bought it used and struggled with it until I bought new carbide blade.
    Bill D

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    I've been pleased with this:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1...3204/205076385

    Don't use it often and wish it had a port for dust collection, but no complaints. The new cordless version does have a dust port interestingly enough.
    I have the cordless version of that saw and it works well for me. The nice thing about Ridgid is if you register it properly it has a lifetime service contract that includes the batteries. I've got Ridgid drills that use the same battery and when a battery went bad it was replaced no problem. One of the drills had a problem after 5-6 years and it was fixed no charge.

    Cliff
    Mudhead: "Doesn't Louise count?" Porgy: "Only to 10, Mudhead."

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I like my mini Porter Cable skill saw. But it is hard to find the 4.5" blades. It cuts just under 2" deep at 90 degrees which is enough for 2 x lumber and door bottoms.
    I bought it used and struggled with it until I bought new carbide blade.
    Bill D
    I prefer worm drives. They never bog down and, with proper maintenance, will outlive me and whoever gets it after me. Like Bill I’ve got a PC314 Trim Saw, equipped with a 4 1/2” Forrest WWII blade. Also have a SkilSaw 7 1/4” with the same blade for bigger stuff, but use the PC a lot more. A lot cheaper than a track saw and rip cuts are just as clean with a guide and the Forrest blades.

    If you’re patient 314s turn up on Craigslist from time to time.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I like my mini Porter Cable skill saw. But it is hard to find the 4.5" blades. It cuts just under 2" deep at 90 degrees which is enough for 2 x lumber and door bottoms.
    I bought it used and struggled with it until I bought new carbide blade.
    Bill D
    Shouldn’t be that hard Bill.

    Pretty much all the borgs stock at least one 4.5” blade at stores. Orange has a Diablo 24t, Blue has a Rockwell 24t. HarborFreight has a 24t that’s a stock item too. Amazon has large number of choice for that size too, some available in a day or two with prime.

  13. #13
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    Why would you want a 6 1/4" saw, I can't think of any reason you would benefit from one? 7 1/4" is not a big saw, what are you gaining by losing capacity with the smaller ones?

    I get it if you just really want one to add to your collection, but they are really quite pointless if you already have a 7 1/4".

  14. #14
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    One reason might be lighter weight, Steve. I know that's a nice thing for the little, inexpensive battery powered unit I mentioned above. With my hand and wrist foibles, the lower weight was a lot more comfortable. My 7.25" saw is a beast and it's not anywhere as heavy as the OP's worm drive 7.25" saw that he mentioned.

    Honestly, aside from the portability it's given me while doing things around our new property, it's also become my "board cut down" solution in the temporary shop because dragging the miter saw out onto the driveway is a pain in the you-know-what.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 09-16-2021 at 9:31 AM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    I have a little Ryobi, I think it's 5 1/4, that is underpowered and not very useful - even with lithium batteries. It sometimes does not go through 2X material presumably because it is a little over 1 1/2 thick. I also have a 6 1/4 inch Skil batter powered saw and it works great. Cuts 2X hardwood fine. I mostly use it to cut hardwood to rough length. But I have used it to cut construction lumber and it works fine. Battery lasts a long time too.

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