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Thread: help with enlarging plans

  1. #1
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    help with enlarging plans

    i have gotten plans that shows each part but most of them are not to scale,,some provide a grid sheet showing each part,,,but some of them i would like to make a template of the actual size,,,and i can half way do it using this method but it would be alot better if i could blow them up to scale,,,i watch alot of steve ramsey videos(wwmm) and a lot of his plans are where you actually have to tape serveral piece of paper together to get the plans at full scale,,can anyone tell me the easiest way to do this or another way,

  2. #2
    Do you have all-in-one printer? Are the existing plans on A-sized paper? (Let's assume a 1" grid on them for the sake of discussion.)

    If 'yes', then scan the plans you have into your PC, test print one of them using the printer set on 1:1 scale (not fit-to-page). Measure the grid of the resulting print. If the 1" grid is printed at 1" actual, then set the print scale to 2:1 (or 3:1, etc., as needed). Most printers will paginate the original 1-pg document into as many printed pages as necessary. Align/orient the output pages and tape then together into a large format plan.

    If the test result is not 1" actual, you will have to play with printer scaling (i.e. 2.1:1) to get output accurate.

    Alternative is scan them into a PDF (or get from provider in this format), then go to a print shop with large format printer and get them to output at proper scale on B-/C-/D-/E-sized paper, as required.
    Last edited by Malcolm McLeod; 09-15-2021 at 3:43 PM.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    You can buy this program that prints out large plans on letter size paper. Doesn't work on Mac https://woodgears.ca/bigprint/index.html

  5. #5
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    they are small,,no larger than paper used in the printer,,they give you the drawing using a 1 in square grid block

  6. #6
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    You can scan or photograph the parts with the grid and import that image into drawing software to scale them visually to a grid you provide for that purpose. So if the original drawing represents a part with 1" squares, draw a 1" scall in the CAD or other drawing program that supports actual dimensions, import the image and manipulate it by proportionally scalling it (both dimensions) to where the 1" square in the important image is the same size as the 1" square you drew in the program. Print out to scale and go from there.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff oldham View Post
    i have gotten plans that shows each part but most of them are not to scale,,some provide a grid sheet showing each part,,,but some of them i would like to make a template of the actual size,,,and i can half way do it using this method but it would be alot better if i could blow them up to scale,,,i watch alot of steve ramsey videos(wwmm) and a lot of his plans are where you actually have to tape serveral piece of paper together to get the plans at full scale,,can anyone tell me the easiest way to do this or another way,
    This is where some high school math, i.e. ratios will help you out. Lets say they give you the over all dimensions of the cabinet as 24 wide, 14 deep and 32 high, but the drawing is on a standard sheet of paper. If you want to know the width of a stile on the door, you measure the width of the total cabinet with your scale (ruler), then measure the width of the stile with the same ruler (scale). So now you have three dimensions, but what is the actual width of the stile.

    Width of the cabinet is supposed to be 24" it measures 5-3/4" on the paper.
    The measured width of the stile on the paper is 3/4"

    Actual width of the stile = 24/5.75 x .75 = 3.13"

    Or for ease of construction you can make it 3-1/8" or even round it to 3" Do the same thing to determine the height of of the stile, using the given dimension for the height of the cabinet instead of the width of the cabinet. Write this dimension on your scale drawing for future reference.

    You can try this by taking a photo of any piece of furniture in your home. Print it out on a 8-1/2 x 11 piece of paper. Measure the length width and height of the cabinet to calculate the dimension of any part using the procedure above. You will be amazed at how close you will get to the actual part dimensions. Just remember to use the correct over all dimension for the direction of the dimension you are trying to determine.
    Lee Schierer
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  8. #8
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    If the problem is you just want them printed larger, not a scaling problem, you can have them printed even up to blueprint size pretty reasonably. blueprintsprinting.com is what I use.

  9. #9
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    For drawings with a grid, I do it old school, a bit of work but free: draw an actual-size grid on a big piece of paper then draw the parts by hand referencing the grid plans. This works well for curved pieces, especially where precision is not critical. Assuming rectangular parts shown not to scale but with dimensions, simply measure and draw. If not all pieces on a sheet are drawn to scale are dimensioned but have a common scale, use the one to determine the actual scale and draw accordingly. A nice drafting board/table helps, something every shop should have.

    I made several of these with the grid method:

    rocking_horse_grandsons.jpg rocking_horse_plans_med.jpg rocking_horse_exploded.jpg

    Another option: graphic arts companies have large printers and can enlarge and print anything scale. Those who do "blueprints" for engineering and architecture can do the same. This method will cost money.

    I don't know if the printing services like what used to be Kinkos have large printers and the capability to scale precisely and print.
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 09-16-2021 at 8:44 AM. Reason: Kinkos

  10. #10
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    I've had good results from Kinko's. I'm tech deficient and those young whippersnappers did a great job scaling my pencil and ruler drawings to actual size and was very reasonable.

  11. #11
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    I took a set of plans to Office Max once. Then enlarged them to scale.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Rozmiarek View Post
    If the problem is you just want them printed larger, not a scaling problem, you can have them printed even up to blueprint size pretty reasonably. blueprintsprinting.com is what I use.
    Steve

    Can you send them a file, or a drawing?
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    Steve

    Can you send them a file, or a drawing?
    I always just send a file, usually a pdf. Fast turnaround times.

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