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Thread: Kitchen Question

  1. #1

    Kitchen Question

    I've been working on my kitchen cabinets for some time...started with this stack of baltic birch plywood and poplar. I used 3/4" ply for the boxes, assembling them with rabbets, screws, and glue. For edge banding I used solid poplar attached with glue and Lamello "tenso" connectors. Interior shelves will set on adjustable pins. Euro-style, no face frames. For cabinet box finish I sprayed 3 coats of GF conversion varnish after box assembly. Doors are painted with whitish semi-gloss. The doors are poplar stiles & rails; "cope & stick" joinery on the router table. Center panel is 1/2" baltic birch ply floating in a groove. The kitchen is about 3/4 done, everything is at least functional. Soapstone counter. Floor was just installed recently (linoleum tile in case anybody is wondering...linoleum as in made with real linseed oil and wood dust...). As you can see we decided to shorten the wall cabinets after they were installed - took them down, shortened by 3", and then re-hung. Question is how to best shorten the wall cabinet doors - should I just remake them or can I just cross-cut them to length and apply a new rail on the bottom?

    Scott B
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  2. #2
    I would remake them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    I would try cutting one down first to see how it goes. If the panels aren’t glued, you should be able to slide them out carefully. If it doesn’t go well, then you always have Plan B.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bain View Post
    I would try cutting one down first to see how it goes. If the panels aren’t glued, you should be able to slide them out carefully. If it doesn’t go well, then you always have Plan B.
    +1.Try one and see how it goes, no harm in it. I'd cut the top off though, less visible when finished.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    No question in my mind...remake the doors.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    I agree with the "try it and see" approach. I wonder if the finish will let you remove the panel, however.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    I think you should be able To save the panel with careful cutting and unassembly.

    But as far as reusing the frame - forget it. Even if you managed to pull it off the time alone will outweigh any material savings. Even then, you’ll still have to contend with the white finish - which you’ll never get match.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I vote for remaking them. For me it is always easier, quicker and looks better.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    You’re fastening edge banding on with Lamello Tenso connectors? I’ve never heard of that! The banding must be thick - like 3/4” thick? How close together do you space the connectors?

  10. #10
    I’ve actually shortened similar doors. I was able to cut the styles and slip the panel out. Then I cut the panel and made a new rail, slid it in and re-glued. They turned out fine. Having said all that, I’m not sure it was easier than making a new door but it is possible.

  11. #11
    You’re fastening edge banding on with Lamello Tenso connectors? I’ve never heard of that! The banding must be thick - like 3/4” thick? How close together do you space the connectors?


    I have the same question. Do you get as good a joint with Tensos as with clamps, and does it save labor?

    I use 1/4" banding applied with glue, clamps and cauls, trimmed flush on the shaper. Laborious, but I can get consistent tight joints compared to a hot melt bander. In my next life I will have a Hess Mobil edge press.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Lindsey View Post
    I’ve actually shortened similar doors. I was able to cut the styles and slip the panel out. Then I cut the panel and made a new rail, slid it in and re-glued. They turned out fine. Having said all that, I’m not sure it was easier than making a new door but it is possible.
    This. Top stile gets destroyed, but you save the door and end up with what you wanted.

  13. #13
    Yes, I did fasten the edge banding with Tenso connectors. I believe it did save me time, over regular long clamps and glue. Plus I don't have enough clamps... The tenso connectors aligned the edging perfectly such that all I had to do is sand - did not need to trim it on the router table. It was expensive however! I spaced the connectors about 4" apart along the front edge of each piece and they are quite tight - no gaps between the plywood edge and the poplar edge banding. The banding is 1" wide and just under 3/4" thick to match the thickness of the plywood. This effectively added 1" of depth to my cabinets. To get good alignment with the Lamello I was very careful to do all the plunges in a highly repeatable way so the results were consistent.

    As for the cabinet door question, I think I will try to salvage the ones I had and make them shorter. I don't expect I will have any issue matching the paint - I still have plenty and will use the same sprayer. After all, I did spray the original doors on different days and times....and everything matched perfectly.

    Thanks!
    Scott B


    ------------------------------------------------------------
    You’re fastening edge banding on with Lamello Tenso connectors? I’ve never heard of that! The banding must be thick - like 3/4” thick? How close together do you space the connectors?


    I have the same question. Do you get as good a joint with Tensos as with clamps, and does it save labor?

    I use 1/4" banding applied with glue, clamps and cauls, trimmed flush on the shaper. Laborious, but I can get consistent tight joints compared to a hot melt bander. In my next life I will have a Hess Mobil edge press.

  14. #14
    Every 4" @ $.75 apiece? That's...expensive. (Mumbles to self... base cabinet sides... two rips per sheet times 96" divided by 4 times 75 cents... yeah, that's expensive.)

    Thinking about the door process... cut off the door just inside a rail, extract the panel (maybe not so easy now it's painted in), recut the panel length and re-insert it, cut and tenon a new rail, glue it in, sand flush with the paint, refinish and done. Maybe fill a hinge hole and re-bore. Certainly doable, saves material, probably a wash on labor. An unmistakable recommendation for mockups.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 09-10-2021 at 2:26 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    965
    As for the cabinet door question, I think I will try to salvage the ones I had and make them shorter. I don't expect I will have any issue matching the paint - I still have plenty and will use the same sprayer. After all, I did spray the original doors on different days and times....and everything matched perfectly.
    Not a color match I'm concerned about.

    It's the sheen that'd I'd be worried about as three sides will have already been finished and one will now be in the raw.

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