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Thread: Plunge Router - Entry Point Issue

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Berwick, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    425

    Plunge Router - Entry Point Issue

    I am pretty new to plunge routing, and I shall admit up front that the router I bought for this is not high end machinery. It is a Mastercraft (Canadian Tire brand) 2hp I bought on sale.

    After I plunge the router in and make my passes to remove the material I want removed, the entry point is noticeably deeper than the rest, resulting in a need for quite a bit of sanding to remove the mark. I have no problem understanding how to set the router up and set the depth stop with the turrets. I have made an accessory base out of 1/4" plexiglass. It is 2' X 2'. The project in question is a tray with an indented (by router) section for the food, and a small round section for the dip container. The main section I am creating is about 5" X 13", while the dip container section is about 3" round. I have tried to ensure that the machine remains hard against the stop while I lock it in place, but, so far, I am not getting any improvement in the result.

    Any advice would be appreciated.
    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    912
    Please post a photo

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    685
    I have had a similar experience years ago. I think what happened to me was that I had to use a lot of force to overcome the springs on the router base and to get through the wood. The way I found to avoid this was to set the stop a little above where I wanted to end up, and then do the final shallow pass with the router already set to depth and just tilt it down into the cut gently. I hope that makes sense.

  4. #4
    Try this:

    Dial back the plunge to about 1/64" above your final depth. Then power on the router, plunge, and route. Next, power off the router, lower the bit stop 1/64", then lift the router, power it on before making contact, and then gradually lower the router onto the dish. You have to take care to lower it gradually but to move it around deftly so as not to burn.

    If this solves your problem, I suspect you are pressing too hard on the plunge, and your base is flexing. After the plunge, your movement is focused on lateral control, so you are not pressing and flexing the base any more.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Berwick, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    425
    Thanks to both of you. You offered up what I thought would be the DS solution. (Sorry, Army background. Directing Staff Solution, therefore the correct answer, no matter what you think!)
    Mike

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