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Thread: Milwaukee Oscillating Multi Tool?

  1. #16
    I dont see the Fein that way, you do custom work then there will be a time you need a thing and it saves you. I can go a long time not needing the belt sander having a stroke sander but the odd time its needed it does the work excellent so fine that it sits between

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    4,934
    I'm with Jack. I have a Fein I picked up in a package used tool buy. I think I have used it two or three times because of the blade costs. I usually find other ways to do the job.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Shorewood, WI
    Posts
    837
    It does sound as if what you want is an angle grinder.

    Oscillating tools have limited uses, but if you need to do those things, they are useful. If you can borrow one to try, you can see if it's worth it to you.

    Or, not everyone agrees with this idea, but you can get a corded one from Harbor Freight for $10 or $20 to see if it does anything you want. You can easily imagine the greater power, convenience, reliability, and the lower vibration of a better brand.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    6,003
    To do a precise, to be left in sight when finished, cut in tile, I use a Dremel with the diamond cutting wheel. It's slow, and the wheels cost about $25 each, for maybe 5 lineal feet of cutting life, but with a steady hand, leaves a nice unchipped line. A shop vacuum can catch all the dust.

    Sometimes the multi-tool is the right tool for different jobs, but it's a last chance choice. Cheap cutters last about as long as you would think they would. I use some longer, carbide ones for cutting some nails when the piece, like a 200 year old siding board, needs to be saved. Other times, it gets the call because a grinder disk would make too much mess. Bosch is my first choice for cutters, too.

    I have a tailed Makita that I see no need to replace. It should have died a dusty death long ago, but keeps on oscillating.

  5. #20
    I have four oscillating tools including a M12 Milwaukee. I use the Milwaukee the most. I also use a DeWalt when volunteering at church and used it earlier today. My 4 are an old HF corded I basically never use, a Ryobi cordless I use for cutting drywall because it does it well and I don't want the dust in my better ones, a Fein corded model and the Milwaukee. The milwaukee cuts wood at essentially the same speed as the Fein, significantly quicker than the others. I haven't tested it versus the DeWalt but they are probably similar. I like the Milwaukee better than the DeWalt but I agree the DeWalt is a good tool.

    My last use of the Milwaukee was late last week. I had a rotted pieces of soffit plywood to cut out and replace. It was far quicker to cut it out with the Milwaukee oscillating saw than it would have been with any other tool. I also have multiple reciprocating saws and jigsaws and plenty of hand saws. But the oscillating saw was the best for this situation. Thin 1/4 plywood so the oscillating saw cut it easily and was easy to control. Reciprocating saw would have worked but would have been like using a sledge hammer where you need a hammer.

    Today I needed a hole for some cords to come out the back of a shop cabinet. I should have drilled a larger hole but the church doesn't have many spade bits and I used the biggest one without measuring the plugs on the cords. So I got out the DeWalt and used the bimetallic blade on it to make a larger rectangular opening in 3/4 plywood. Four pretty quick plunges and I was done. Didn't make a perfect hole but it is in the back of a shop cabinet so it's plenty good enough.

    I have a grit blade for ceramic but I agree with the other comments that for the most part there are better ways to cut tile. I might use the grit blade to touch up or fine tune a cut but I wouldn't try cutting a 12 inch tile with it. I use a grinder with an abrassive blade mostly. The carbide blades do surprisingly well in steel but are expensive and I would not try and do long cuts with them either. But I have had situations where they were very handy. Mostly I cut wood with my oscillating tools. I also find them very handy to make precise holes in drywall for electrical boxes, however. I've used mine to cut off trim when fitting tile. I can do it with a flush cut hand saw but it is a lot easier with the oscillating tool.

    Milwaukee blades are also pretty good. Bimetallic blades will not cut hardly any metal before going dull, however. Doesn't matter the brand. Carbide will last a little while. Milwaukee wood cutting blades are good - as are others. I think I like the Fein the best.

    If you want to get one, I think the Milwaukee would be a great choice, especially since you already have batteries. Blade changes do not require tools and are pretty quick. Good power and control. There are other good ones but I don't think any are enough better to invest in another battery platform.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,094
    There is at least one YouTube video about how to sharpen multi-tool blades using a jewelers file.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Minot, ND
    Posts
    500
    I have a corded Fein and a Fuel M12 Milwaukee. I also used to have the M12 predecessor that was available before they released the Fuel version. Since getting the Fuel M12, I haven't touched the old one other than to get it out to give it away to one of my sons. The Fuel is quieter, has better speed control, less vibration and toolless blade changing. Unless I have a lot of cutting to do, such as trimming back door jambs and other items when installing flooring, the M12 will invariably get put into use.

    I just ended up having to use the non-Fuel M12 on a trip to the son's place, (far away from my home tools), and though it got the job done, reminded of how glad I am that I sprang for the M12 Fuel version.

    Clint

  8. #23
    Keith I sharpen my sawzall stuff. its faster and easier than a trip to the depot. Have 10 Axe blades that when done are 85 percent as good as new. PLus i like the old ones before the nanny state anti kick back stuff as they cut faster. Just an air die grinder and a cut off wheel, hardest thing is getting a comfortable work position to get the wheel in and not get too wild.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    513
    I was a general contractor and as I got older, went to just handyman work.
    I have a fein corded and have never been tempted to get the Milwaukee even though all my portable tools are Milwaukee.
    When I need the versatility of the fein, nothing else can take itís place. Even if itís a year between uses, itís there and ready to go.
    The cost of blades? Give me a break! Universal blades are everywhere.
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,094
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    Keith I sharpen my sawzall stuff. its faster and easier than a trip to the depot. Have 10 Axe blades that when done are 85 percent as good as new. PLus i like the old ones before the nanny state anti kick back stuff as they cut faster. Just an air die grinder and a cut off wheel, hardest thing is getting a comfortable work position to get the wheel in and not get too wild.

    Thanks Warren, I will give the idea of sharpening my sawzall blades some thought. Initially I was considering machining a matched set of grooved solid surface blocks (sawtooth design) that would slide together for the movement and take care of the spacing. Just need to come up with a mount for the grinder and depth adjustment. I could also consider a sliding jig blade holder with an engraved scale that would probably work for both style blades.

    The same type of jig would also work for multi tool blades if I could adjust the height.

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