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Thread: Martin T17 Joinery saw back in service

  1. #31

  2. #32
    Sorry guys my attempt of posting pics seems a bit unskilled. Unsure why they came out 90 to the left. I even went back and changed the image ratio to 1:1. Anyways.... Many thanks Joe for replying. Mark has responded to a couple quick emails, but I thought that a public post was more appropriate to share with others and not put anybody on the spot if they are busy. If anyone thinks that I should start a new thread please advise, don't mean to hijack a ongoing thread....
    In general, the saw probably has not seen alot of use for many years. The table is micro pitted but still very smooth, more like a patina. The slider ways are in really good shape it seems. There is some bearing wear but think it will probably be fine if I replace the bearings. Doesn't slide any worse than my T130 with cast slider which still makes a fine tenon cut.
    I am unsure what the tilt ways are called but any exposed area on them has some very light rust. Any moving parts that have been covered with their mating part is pretty much cherry. I think the oiler when operational and grease zerks really saved this machine even if they haven't been used for some time.
    The oil lines are all rotted away but the hardware is still all in tact. I probably will just bring back to original to get started. Too much going on to get overboard.
    The dado extension is missing but have the original arbor nut and flanges. I hear you on not puling anything if not needed. The arbor bearing from the 5 seconds I ran it sounded fine. And feels fine. I have not mic'd it for run out.
    Tilt , up/down, slider, and fence, all moving well enough to use. The one thing that took a few hours of lube and wiggle was the arbor lock. But it's freed up enough to work properly now. It's in a tight spot and after two hours of wiggle left me with blisters between my fingers. lol. I think I get a little OCD sometimes...
    I will replace the slider bearings and fence bearings. We have a great bearing and belt shop locally. A boon for being 2500 miles of shore.
    My height lock doesn't lock. Seems maybe there was supposed to be a washer or something behind the turn knob?
    I included a pic of the electrical box if anyone can walk me thru testing some things. I'm getting some weird continuity across all three lines for a single point on the other end so unsure if that is proper.
    I did find the main breaker switch seems working. But unsure of the other components. I would probably quickly opt for an easier set up to replace the whole thing. It was an Eric Riebling Co. import.
    One thing I see when looking at the range of modifications that martin made on these is the right side table insert that is held with screws. Joe, yours is longer than mine. The whole insert set up is a little wonky and you invented the best option for next to zero clearance as you can get I think. The right side little insert on mine seems to only be there for the leading edge of the blade.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    147
    Man I wish I had friends like you, Correy! A free T17 is a ridiculous score! I have a similar vintage T17 that I plan to fully restore down the road, but donít have the time to commit to that just yet and the saw runs great as is. Mine is missing the dust chute unfortunately so Iíll have to fabricate one. Yours looks like it has a lot of potential. I donít have the same level of knowledge that Joe and Mark do on these matters, but would strongly encourage you to keep the saw and get it operational. They are very nice machines and run incredibly smooth. The dado extension is really nice to have along with the 1.25Ē arbor that gives the flexibility to share shaper cutters as Joe mentioned. I take advantage of the ability to do that surprisingly often. Good Luck!
    .EB4D1D21-7214-41D6-8F68-277438F97A24.jpgDBFEB129-5087-46F8-ABA3-D0768B808092.jpg

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
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    1,384
    Correy,
    Both yours and John’s appear to be maybe one or 2 years older than mine with the E stop down low. They both have the better rip fence.
    I actually wish I had the old style cross fence like yours.
    I post pictures from a I pad and find if I rotate them once around they usually post fine. Don’t worry about posting your gear on this thread. I like to see other saws.
    joe

  5. #35
    john, is that a spacer sitting under the nut or is it part of the nut? Seems like it would be easy to get made. Your saw is in pretty good shape. Mine is no far behind it. Completely useable as is. Joe and Mark did just completely amazing restores but I don't know if I will ever get there. Cutting true and reliable is the current goal, which should be a fairly direct path. I'm hoping a VFD or simiiar would be an easy plug and play fix for powering the main motor.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    147
    Correy, thatís a spacer under the nut. Sorry I made that photo more confusing than it needed to be. My saw came set up with the dado arbor in place, but without the main arbor nut. Joe saved the day on that one providing me with the part number. Itís the same one used on the newer T72ís.

    My T17 experienced heavy use in its past, and even with its history required very little work on my part to get it operating accurately. It beats the hell out of any modern cabinet saw Iíve used, but I am partial to these old cast iron German machines. I would assume the same can be said of what you have on your hands.

    Joe and Markís restorations are works of art. I hope to get my saw there one day, but in the meantime it works for me and earns a valuable place in my shop. Iím happy to do my best to get any information you need that might be helpful.

  7. #37
    Amazing work Joe! I love to see OWWM restored to original glory. In your case, perhaps, better than original.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,384
    Thanks Derek! It’s a lot of labor and not something you will ever get a ROI on other than using it for your own pleasure. I’m semi retired and have a little time for this. John and Corry are smart to just get the mechanical working properly and put them into service. The painting and detailing are very labor intensive.

    Corry, I will measure the threads and size of the extension nut. McMaster has large metric nuts but not sure if they have LH. The nut should be a simple job for a good machinest.

  9. #39
    Hi Joe, John.
    Here's my nut and outer flange. Can I assume if you use a dado you leave the inner flange on? How would that work with a shaper groover where the flat around the arbor bore may not be the same as the flange? Since the flange contacts on the outer rim.
    In regards to the dado ext and nut, is there a separate nut specific to the extension? Could you not use the regular nut with spacers? It would be really cool to use my adjustable groovers for dado on the saw since they are already 1.25".

    Just curious Joe, How many hours/days do you think you had tied up in breaking down and painting the saw? Did you start yours before Mark , were you guys doing this at the same time? Bewtween both of your generous photos digests you'd be saving someone days of head scratching.

    Oh, hey, another question for John, joe, who ever knows... The sliding arbor lock, There's the slotted screw that comes down thru the top in the trunnion block and holds it. When I was looking at Mark's rebuild of that his spindle lock rod has two grooves. There doesn't seem anyway to remove it without pulling the top off. The screw on mine if backed off 1/4 turn from tight seems to act as a stop for the rod in and out. Feels like there is a flat on top of the rod. Are you supposed to lock the rod in place with the screw or is the screw just for depth stopping?

    As far as switches, I see a number of these machines on EU sites that have some sort of simple mag start. Is that even an option with this type of motor?
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    Last edited by Correy Smith; 04-24-2023 at 1:09 AM.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,384
    Correy,
    I don’t use the flange with the dado extension as it is a different nut. The hole is larger on the flange to accept the shoulder of the normal nut.
    Not remembering but I think the top has to be off to remove the spindle lock. That screw holds a spring loaded ball detent.
    I measured the nut and it is 2mm thread spacing X 30mm LH. I think different from the arbor nut but I will check.

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    Last edited by Joe Calhoon; 04-24-2023 at 12:06 PM.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,384
    The saw I did not keep track of time. It was 5 or 6 months of part time. I did keep track when I did the T23 shaper. It was ridiculous- around 250 plus hrs. The saw was a lot quicker. Learned a lot with the shaper. If your dealing with rust that adds a lot of time.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    147
    Correy, here are some additional photos the the arbor extension setup to compliment Joeís examples. Trying to show how it goes together which is why the one photo shows them just starting to thread together. The ability to share shaper cutters and spacers is really nice and a huge benefit in my shop.

    C7B593E7-AF26-40E1-9C4A-A70090B6A76A.jpgC365AD81-274F-4D4C-9372-3F249C3B9CCB.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #43
    Hi guys I think you gave me plenty of info to get the dado ext. made.
    I'm getting some good help on OWWM.org with the controls too.

    Joe, 250 hours seems pretty reasonable for the results. How'd you get the table so shiny to bare metal? Lemon juice?
    Thanx again big help guys.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    1,384
    Hi Corry,
    Scotchbrite in an orbital sander works pretty well for making things shiny. Some people take it to another level using a buffing wheel and compound.
    Mark is a very talented and experienced machine rebuilder and I’m sure his restoration was a lot quicker than mine. On both the saw and shaper I had to back up several times to redo things. I do enjoy it and find it relaxing. And frustrating at times!

  15. #45
    So what type of grease for the arbor and pulley are you using?
    Are you also using the 20w20 oil for lube points or??

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