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Thread: Sebastian died.

  1. #16
    Something tells me she was being evicted for more reasons than that. The way I see it, people who do not treat animals with respect & decency show their true colors towards all humanity. While Sebastian may have been born "distant" towards people, he could have learned to be that way by his previous owner. Thank you for caring for Sebastian with respect and handling his situation as best as you knew how. While you may not have loved the dog, he did work his way into your heart. You were able to find good in him even though he had a hard time showing it.
    I read recipes the same way I read science fiction. I get to the end and I think, "Well, thatís not going to happen."

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,542
    My sincere condolences for your loss of Sebastian. Even though your head may be telling you that you didn't love him, clearly, that was not the case in reality. He may have been a curmudgeon, but I bet he still knew that he was in a good place all those years. His taking comfort from you later in life is a clear indicator of that. So kudos to you for caring for him all this time. In fact, thank you for that. It was a blessing.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Sounds like you did the best you could for that dog.
    Thank you for caring Perry. I'm glad someone did.
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  4. #19
    Tears in my eyes. We have an inherited 16YO Brindle Pit. She was miss treated earlier in life before grandson rescued her. Took her a while to adjust to being around another (older, also inherited) dog. After older dog passed, she was left here alone. She made friends with children down the street, and would go and met them at bus stop each afternoon. Unfortunately this meant crossing very busy road. So, in order to keep her from getting run over, we had to restrict her to back yard. Then hearing loss set in. She now can only hear the thunder, which because it breaks the silence, terrifies her. Used to love to "go for a ride," but now I have to help her in and out of the truck. Some times when she jumps down the steps (two steps) her front legs give way. The look in her eyes when this happens brings tears to my eyes. Spends these hot days laying her box on back porch, by the door, in front of a fan. I know her days are numbered, an it makes me sad to think about it

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,817
    Itís good that there are nice people like you in the worldÖÖRod

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Location
    Central Pa.
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    Tears in my eyes. We have an inherited 16YO Brindle Pit. She was miss treated earlier in life before grandson rescued her. Took her a while to adjust to being around another (older, also inherited) dog. After older dog passed, she was left here alone. She made friends with children down the street, and would go and met them at bus stop each afternoon. Unfortunately this meant crossing very busy road. So, in order to keep her from getting run over, we had to restrict her to back yard. Then hearing loss set in. She now can only hear the thunder, which because it breaks the silence, terrifies her. Used to love to "go for a ride," but now I have to help her in and out of the truck. Some times when she jumps down the steps (two steps) her front legs give way. The look in her eyes when this happens brings tears to my eyes. Spends these hot days laying her box on back porch, by the door, in front of a fan. I know her days are numbered, an it makes me sad to think about it
    Anticipatory grief sucks.. I think it starts the day you bring them home, really.

    Anyone that abuses them needs to be dragged to a post and shot, period. I get to pull the trigger. (or the rope)

    God bless anyone that rescues! That's the only way we adopt.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    83
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Hart View Post
    Anticipatory grief sucks.. I think it starts the day you bring them home, really.

    Anyone that abuses them needs to be dragged to a post and shot, period. I get to pull the trigger. (or the rope)

    God bless anyone that rescues! That's the only way we adopt.
    I bought my current (first dog as an adult) because I wanted a boxer in a bad way and couldnít find any to rescue. Paid about 1/3 the going rate because he didnít have papers, which I wasnít concerned about. Time went on and Iím not sure heís purebred, again Iím not concerned in the slightest. But heís 120lbs of pure freakin muscle. Most gentle, lovable, scaredy-cat and pain in the butt there could ever be all wrapped up in one.
    Anyways, point of the post is he was 3 when my daughter was born. Those two are inseparable. My son could take him or leave him- but my daughter adores max. Sheís 3 1/2 now, heís 6. When she was about a year old I said itís going to really suck losing max, because Sophia will be just at that age where she understands. My wife looked at me and asked how I could even think about such a thing. I donít know, itís life and dogs have shorter span then humans so itís just a fact itís going to happen.
    About 6 months ago out of the blue they were playing and she said you know youíre right, itís going to devastate her when that time comes.
    Hope Iím better equipped down the road to deal with her heartbreak than I feel I would be right nowÖ

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    Tears in my eyes. We have an inherited 16YO Brindle Pit. Used to love to "go for a ride," but now I have to help her in and out of the truck. Some times when she jumps down the steps (two steps) her front legs give way. The look in her eyes when this happens brings tears to my eyes.
    At 16 years old, I bet she would really appreciate a longer ramp over the steps with a little traction on it. (She might need a little coaxing with a treat to show her it's safe to walk on it.) By the time our old girl made it to 15+ years, we carried her up/down any elevation changes due to the tumble factor. She would patiently wait at even one single step for help up/down. There is nothing more helpless then watching a senior tumble in front of you and you can't catch them in time. We are all going to get there at some point in our life. Build up as much karma as you can!
    I read recipes the same way I read science fiction. I get to the end and I think, "Well, thatís not going to happen."

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