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Thread: 10 years ago today - I retired!

  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
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    1,864
    I retired at 67 after 43 years as a tech in an industrial R&D lab. Uncommonly fortunate to have a job almost perfect for someone with my abilities and disabilities. After retirement I often dreamed I was still working though retired and not being paid. I simply showed up as usual and no co-workers seemed to find that strange. After 8 years that doesn’t happen but not long ago I had one where I was visiting the lab and got upset about the failed maintenance of a gas calorimeter that was old when I was hired . Life and emotional needs are funny things. I miss the accomplishments and the and respect I got from my bosses and co-workers but things and circumstances change. I continue to be fortunate in retirement
    My three favorite things are the Oxford comma, irony and missed opportunities

    The problem with humanity is: we have paleolithic emotions; medieval institutions; and God-like technology. Edward O. Wilson

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Longview WA
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    After retirement I often dreamed I was still working though retired and not being paid.
    One of my retired co-workers called those work-mares. (as in nightmares)

    In 14 years only one or two of those have come my way.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Conway, Arkansas
    Posts
    13,079
    I'm about 5 years away from retiring. I long for the day.
    Thanks & Happy Wood Chips,
    Dennis -
    Get the Benefits of Being an SMC Contributor..!
    ....DEBT is nothing more than yesterday's spending taken from tomorrow's income.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    ...I do miss the people...
    My dad began to decline health-wise (not cognitively, but more motivation to do things from a suddenly sedentary lifestyle) within five years or so of retiring from his teaching job. He had pre-existing health issues that contributed to his passing but both my brother and I feel strongly that if Dad had stayed on in some capacity with his school, there would have been more motivation for him to get up every day. School was his whole social circle. Once he retired, those people no longer were present in his life. Moral of this story being "Have a plan" ahead of time.

    My wife actually have this conversation pretty often. She has a huge social circle and would happily retire tomorrow if she could. I, on the other hand, want to work until the day I drop dead.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Northeast Ohio
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    83
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    I, on the other hand, want to work until the day I drop dead.

    Erik
    I was once of this thought. I’m not sure if it came with getting older (as ‘older’ as you can get at 36..) or just gaining a family- wife then kids- but I’m on the retire as early as possible train now. My career isn’t really something I can say I truly enjoy- more just was in the family and it was what I knew and now I make a pretty good living at it, but it’s still just a grueling job with stresses of meeting my income desires every week.
    I long for a day in the future where I’ll have time to chase an activity for the enjoyment of it rather than be too tired or stressed from work and all the other necessities that go along with life to think about such a thing.
    Last edited by Adam Grund; 08-20-2021 at 6:55 PM.

  6. #21
    Retired four years ago this November. Worked for myself the last 25 years. Other than that, only held one job for more than eight years. Worked for the same boss at two different companies for a total of 13 years. Treasure the experience of many jobs, and the people I got to meet. Well, most of them. Had a couple of insecure bosses who weren't a pleasure to work for. Can't figure out how I had time to work, based upon my schedule now. Busier than ever, and not making progress on catching up.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
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    2,072
    Interesting perspectives here. Congratulations on the 10 year mark Rich. I'm pulling the plug in the next few months. I haven't set an exact date yet. I really enjoy my job. It was perfect for me. Rarely am I doing the same job two days in a row or in the same location. The down side of that is it can also be in some miserable weather conditions. Blistering hot or bitter cold. I'm still a valued asset and it will be difficult to walk away. I've saw many things in my career and traveled to many places doing my job. Whether working at the south edge of Glacier National Park or on the banks of the Mississippi. I've been taken in by air boat to get to a broken machine and been flown by corporate jet to get taken where the critical need was. I wouldn't trade these experiences for a job where I went to the same place day after day and had the same basic duties day after day. Been there and done that. However I am looking forward to being able to relax when I want and go to the shop when I want. I don't want to quit everything because as Erik stated if you don't have a motivation and something to keep you going it can go down hill all to fast. Given my bad experience last winter with Covid it also makes you start thinking about what's important. As much as I do enjoy my job I need to refocus on family and doing things for enjoyment. Whether it's making something in the shop or traveling or attending grand kids ball games and school functions. I'm hoping I transition well. I have lot's of smart guys in here I can ask for advice I can see. Retirement, what we all seek.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    60,547
    Ronald, it can be a difficult decision sometimes to retire when there is a lot of positive in the work and work environment. I unequivocally do miss a lot of the people and fortunately, am still in touch with many via social media. I also liked my work, particularly the mentoring I did the last couple of years to a young, 25 yo new account manager that I supported. She was great. At the same time, "enjoyable" and "I really want to do this every day" began to separate over that same time period. It was routine. It was safe. I paid very well. I worked from home for nearly 20 years, traveling when necessary for customer interaction and internal things including internationally. But the "spark" wasn't there any more after 21 years with that employer and 38+ years in full time work. The numbers were favorable, having done "the right thing" over the years, so I put on the superman underwear and made the move. Zero regrets. So congratulations in advance for making the move yourself. It's good. Just be prepared to be busier than ever! LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,818
    Very good advice Erik, when I was in my thirties my employer had me attend a retirement planning seminar.

    One of the discussions was that you should begin developing your retirement interests decades before you retire because if for example you aren’t woodworking before retirement it’s likely you won’t after.

    I took that to heart which is why my office sported a “work interferes with my hobbies” sign…….Regards, Rod

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Wenatchee. Wa
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    597
    I would have to be paid a awful lot to go back to work!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
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    6,269
    I would have to be paid a awful lot to go back to work!
    Amen to that!
    I hated retirement at first.
    It felt more like I did or said something inappropriate at work and got sent home without pay instead of a prolonged vacation.
    Since I had retired at 59 1/2, I had no income at all. My plan was to just hang on until I turned 62 & started social security.
    From a dollars and sense (& cents too!) point, we were ok since we had my wife's income & the rent income. I'd made sure all the debts were paid & we had nothing going out, which also helped.
    Once I had social security coming in every month, I felt a whole lot better about retirement. It wasn't the amount of money there as it was the dependability of it.

    Ten years later - I feel a lot different about it. I don't want to go back to a job ever again. Not for any amount of money.
    (I'm ok with pitching in with the rental properties though for another year - but - that's different)
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    640
    27 months into retirement and I love it. I make "treen" for a local foodie shop that sells my stuff and did a paid kitchen cab job this past the spring. I make what I like when I like and have quite a few interests besides woodworking that keeps me involved with life.

    I don't understand those who get "bored" in retirement unless health issues keep them from doing stuff.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Grund View Post
    I was once of this thought. I’m not sure if it came with getting older (as ‘older’ as you can get at 36..) or just gaining a family- wife then kids- but I’m on the retire as early as possible train now...
    We don't have kids or any immediate heirs aside from our pets, so it's perhaps a little different. Personally, I need the ability to stay engaged in human interaction at some level, but don't necessarily want to remain beholden to it like a full-time job, for income. My wife chuckles at this but my dream after I retire is to be a barista at some neighborhood coffee shop for maybe 15-20 hours a week.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Goleta / Santa Barbara
    Posts
    879
    Erik, i understand the desire for social interaction, but most of the baristas i meet are too busy to have anything other than a short exchange, and i live in a town smaller than Austin. In a big city i think it could be brutal, as less sociable people in the line behind have a way of grunting and groaning that translates into "hey old man, get the heck out of my way" . . . and those are the polite ones without anger management issues . . .

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    6,269
    My wife chuckles at this but my dream after I retire is to be a barista at some neighborhood coffee shop for maybe 15-20 hours a week.
    We have a lot of new motels that have sprung up around us. I toyed with the idea of getting a part time job working there.
    My thought was they might offer some rate deal for employees on rooms & we could take advantage of that if we traveled.
    I never followed through though.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

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