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Thread: EVS drill press

  1. #1
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    EVS drill press

    I have a Delta drill press that has the Reeves drive system for variable speed. It is OK, but I occasionally have a problem with it grabbing the belt and stopping dead. I have lubed and checked it several times, and usually limit it to about 2/3 speed when it starts shaking to warn me the belt is vibrating and preparing to lock up again. So far the belt is still good.

    I am running out of patience (and apparently ability to fix it). I have looked at the two Nova models, but there are things I don't like about each.

    So, I notice that Rikon is building tools with electronic speed controlled motors, and they just brought out a full size EVS Lathe.

    Finally the question.

    Has anyone heard about a possible Rikon EVS drill press coming out soon?
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  2. #2
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    No.

    but Nova makes two drill presses based on their elect. variable speed motors.

    https://www.teknatool.com/product-ca...drill-presses/

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    I am running out of patience (and apparently ability to fix it). I have looked at the two Nova models, but there are things I don't like about each.
    Out of curiosity, what don't you like about the Nova models?

    I have the Voyager and quite like it. Not going to try to convince you otherwise, just wondering what the issue is.

  4. #4
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    I've been looking for a new drill press as well. Powermatic has an EVS drill press (2820 EVS) although availability is into October. There are a few reviews on YouTube that point out a design flaw in the table tilt "return to zero" mechanism, but other than that it seems like a nice machine. I'm still undecided and will wait to see if there are any sales closer to the holidays.

  5. #5
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    I wondered why drill presses didnít get on the Evs bandwagon. Maybe because nobody made them? I have a 40 year old craftsman 17Ē floor dp. The motor was making buzzy sounds so I converted it to evs. I donít know much about the controllers and it lacks torque at extremely slow speeds. I donít run it that way much so itís not a big deal.

  6. #6
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    Roger, VFD controlled motors lose torque and hp pretty much in direct relation to hz and /or rpm. 60 hz is full power, 30 hz is half power and half torque, 15hz is 1/4 power etc.
    Best bet is buy a older dp with a factory 3 phase motor and run it from a vfd. probably will be a better made unit then a new EVS machine. At least for under $700 complete.
    Bill D

  7. #7
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    Luke,

    Personal preference.

    The big one has more bells and whistles than I want or need. The small one I could live with, but the depth rod on the big one is not on the little one, and I use it a lot. I also like the split case for the ram on older style units, as you can lock the spindle anywhere you want for sanding or specialized work.

    I am selling off some tools I seldom use, and could afford either one, but at these prices I am not willing to 'settle'. I would be looking to upgrade an old one, but don't have that much time to fool with it now.

    Unless someone brings out a basic EVS unit I will probably keep messing with the one I have.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Roger, VFD controlled motors lose torque and hp pretty much in direct relation to hz and /or rpm. ...
    My round-2-it plan is to convert my heavy duty drill press to VFD, but will swap the 1.5hp motor for 3hp (for 'torque recapture'). Currently, driven thru 2 belts and 3 stepped pulleys, it will reduce to 1 belt and a pair of stepped pulleys (seldom touched?). Or better, a C-face motor and direct drive, if I can devote enough time to motor mount design/build. VFD will handle the (240V) 1-phase conversion to 3-phase motor.

    Likely the (tank-ish) frame can handle the extra Hp, but just as likely I'll never operate at full throttle anyway.

    If someone else is contemplating this - and feels the need for >3600 rpm, then simply set the max Hz in the VFD as required, most will handle 200Hz, some as high as 400Hz (=24,000rpm on a nominal 3600 rpm motor). ...Obviously, with careful selection of cutters! You could argue all the bearings will take a beating, but with SF<1 typical of a DP, it should be manageable.

  9. #9
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    The low torque problem that Bill describes probably explains why Powermatic put a 2-speed gearbox on their EVS drill press.

  10. #10
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    Trying to envision what would cause it to lock on the belt. When you inspect the pulleys and belt what do you find when this happens? With a Reeves system you have the controlling pulley and the slave that simply follows the lead of the controlling pulley. It will normally be doing the opposite of the controlling pulley. Of course if you are mid range they both will be in the middle. To be honest I think I would try a new belt but maybe you have. I say this because the only scenario I can picture in my small mind is at some speed ranges the belt width varies just enough to cause pulley "bounce". Eventually getting worse until it locks as you say. Anyway my opinion and $2 bucks will get you a gas station coffee.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    Luke,

    Personal preference.

    The big one has more bells and whistles than I want or need. The small one I could live with, but the depth rod on the big one is not on the little one, and I use it a lot. I also like the split case for the ram on older style units, as you can lock the spindle anywhere you want for sanding or specialized work.

    I am selling off some tools I seldom use, and could afford either one, but at these prices I am not willing to 'settle'. I would be looking to upgrade an old one, but don't have that much time to fool with it now.

    Unless someone brings out a basic EVS unit I will probably keep messing with the one I have.
    Rick, I have the Voyager. Yes, it has more bells-and-whistles than I need, but it also has all the features I want. It is not a cheap drill, but it is also not wildly expensive compared with a tablesaw or similar. I just use those features important to me. These perform superbly: power and grunt forever, long reach, easy setting drill speed, setting the ideal drill speed for each drill type and size, and into material type, not to forget the depth stop and reversing ability. There is more but these are worth the entry price.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Dilyard View Post
    I've been looking for a new drill press as well. Powermatic has an EVS drill press (2820 EVS) although availability is into October. There are a few reviews on YouTube that point out a design flaw in the table tilt "return to zero" mechanism, but other than that it seems like a nice machine. I'm still undecided and will wait to see if there are any sales closer to the holidays.
    I'm loving my new PM 2820 EVS it's awesome. The return to zero is a laughable joke but irrelevant. I would never trust the pin for zero anyway without checking zero with my spindle square and if I'm doing that I'll just dial it in at zero and tighten the large hex nut and be done with it. I dialed mine in to zero within .001 over the 6 inches of the dual indicator spindle square, easy.

    The 2820EVS has a larger table than the Nova, a more substantial head I had to use an engine shop crane to install it, and the table turns 90 degrees left or right to drill the end of legs etc. vs the Nova 45 degrees.

    Everything about the 2820EVS is BEEFY wow never saw a drill press table with that volume of cast iron ribbing under it. The ribs are 2 inches tall, and a pair of them on the left side, another pair on the right, a pair of ribs at the back and one at the front with additional V ribbing between. While I had the spindle square installed I put an arm across the front of the table and leaned on it, barely could get it to deflect .003.

    Simplicity. Press ON dial the speed with a knob and get to drilling.

    The depth stop and lock is absolution BRILLIANT!! Man I'm loving that.

    I did purchase a higher end chuck, Llambrich keyless. The PM2820 spindle bore measured about .0002 run out. Cleaning the bore twice and turning the Llambrich 180 degrees once produced a final runout with a ground 1/2 inch rod chucked in the drill of .0005 inch.

    dp01.jpg
    Last edited by Charles Coolidge; 08-19-2021 at 2:02 PM.

  13. #13
    Rick, I have the smaller nova (really happy with it). It does have a mechanical stop but not a rod. It's on the base of the hand crank mechanism like on the smaller benchtop deltas. Personally, I do like the rod but this "works".

  14. #14
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    Thanks Ronald, It seems like the belt is too loose, but I fail to see any way to tighten it. Over a medium rpm it starts to vibrate until it locks up on the front pully. Then I use a wrench on a bolt in the chuck to reverse it until it lets go. Lubed it many times, no rust, no damage I can see. I have always wondered if I could tighten the front pully, but there is nothing in the manual, and I don't want to mess it up by getting too adventurous.


    Derek, It's not the money, it just has too many gizmos I will never use. Heck, I don't even know how to put pics on this site without spending over an hour to figure it out each time (not the site problem, it's getting them off the computer). I have enough problems turning on my MM CU 300, with its combo of 8 buttons switches or shutoffs. I am competent in mechanics (except for Reeves pulleys obviously) but an absolute idiot with electronic devices.

    John, It is really a nice machine, but for me, the Rod and split case are non starters. Just personal preference.

    I have looked extensively at both Nova's but have not seen the PM in person yet, but I believe it does not have the split case, sheave, housing, or whatever it is called.

    Thanks for all the info everybody, as mentioned I asked a while back about what to do with my stalling problem, and tried all the suggestions. It got better for a while, and maybe if I lube it again it will work for another year.

    You folks are very patient, thank you.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  15. #15
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    I have read this thread and quite a few similar ones. I have hd the Nova Voyager for a couple of years now and really like it. I understand that some do not like all the electronics and I guess I kind of understand that. The one thing that I do not care for is the fact that the Nova only table tilts 45 degrees and I think that this is a major flaw. However, the Voyager does have a substantially more powerful motor and wider speed range.

    I put together a table comparison of the two drill presses based on the data on their respective websites.

    Nova B.jpg Nova A.jpg

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