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Thread: Which Titebond Glue?

  1. #1
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    Which Titebond Glue?

    would anyone know which has the least springback for bent laminaions? Titebond II or III?

    there's also TBond Etend which looks interesting
    http://www.titebond.com/product/glue...d-79f8a75a2e95
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Joe Wood; 08-01-2021 at 5:35 PM.
    WoodsShop

  2. #2
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    I'd like to use weldwood plastic resin but can't trust what I can buy locally with a 1 year shelf life.
    WoodsShop

  3. #3
    Titebond Extend has the most rigid glueline in the Titebond line. That said, urea formaldehyde (plastic resin, Unibond 800) and epoxy will give you less springback and more working time. I generally use epoxy for this applicationdue to its long shelf life, working time and fairly stiff glueline. I would have a hard time with any pva adhesive getting the piece shown clamped up working by myself before it set up. I would stay away from TIII for bent laminations as it seems pretty gummy when cured.

    That is an interesting shape. What is the application?

  4. #4
    Iíve done a lot of laminating and never seen much difference in spring back. I would use Titebond 2 or the plastic resin glue. All the plastic
    resin glue Iíve seen that did not work would not mix up properly, we sent it back and got a refund with no hassle.

  5. #5
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    I've used titebond original for bent laminations and had no noticeable springback, but the bend wasn't extreme by any means. I my research, lots of people used the same glue for the rockers in a rocking chair and they've had great long term results.

    The other popular glue is the plastic resin glue since it dries so much harder. For an extreme bend like in your pictures, that's what I would use.

  6. #6
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    yeah I'm afraid of usong epoxy because of the amount I need in a short time, 10 minutes to get it all clamped up. It always goes off on me too fast, even putting it in a shallow paint pan.

    these are moon gates I make Kevin.

    Moon Gates.jpg
    Last edited by Joe Wood; 08-01-2021 at 6:21 PM.
    WoodsShop

  7. #7
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    In bent lamination, there's two effects to consider: springback, and creep. They both cause the bent lamination to straighten out, but over different time scales.

    Springback happens immediately after you take the lamination off the bending form. It has little to do with the glue. It is mostly affected by the number of laminates. More layers gives you less springback.

    Creep is an odd characteristic of some supposedly solid materials. If you put the material under constant stress, it slooowly moves. Some plastics exhibit this behavior. Bent laminations keep the glue under constant stress. If you use a glue which creeps, the glue slowly moves, and the lamination slowly straightens out. (Slowly may mean several years.) The knock on PVA glues like Titebond is that they creep. Glues which don't creep include: Epoxy, Unibond 800, and Plastic Resin Glue (urea formaldehyde).

  8. #8
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    I use Titebond II Premium and Titebond II Ultimate and I am happy with both. A little goes a long way.

  9. #9
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    Check out West System epoxy from Gougeon Brothers, 105 resin with 206 hardener would give you enough open time and cure clear with little spring back.
    https://www.westsystem.com

  10. #10
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    good explanation Jamie!

    OK so where would I buy plastic resin glue that would not be expired? The last few I tried I bought locally and all three had expired.
    WoodsShop

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Wood View Post
    good explanation Jamie!

    OK so where would I buy plastic resin glue that would not be expired? The last few I tried I bought locally and all three had expired.
    Dunno where to buy plastic resin glue. I got scared of the formaldehyde exposure, and stopped using Unibond 800. (Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen. The building products industry has been working hard to remove it from their products. Often now I see building materials labelled "no formaldehyde added" or some such.) (However, when I tried to learn more, I couldn't find any authority which was willing to tell me if the dosage I might get from bent laminating might hurt me. I finally gave up and went to epoxy. Of course YMMV.)

  12. #12
    Unibond 800 and ppr are available from https://veneersystems.com/product-ca...hesives/ureas/

    I use epoxy for lengthy glueups frequently. You can mix several batches in sequence for a large quantity. For extended working time use a slow hardener and/or set your paint pan in an ice bath.

  13. #13
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    I would use System Three T-88 epoxy for that application. It is a structural epoxy so it won't creep, and it has at least 45 minutes working time. It's what I use for all exterior door work now. Clean up is easy with plain old white vinegar, or lacquer thinner.

    John

  14. #14
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    I started storing my Unibond 800 in my shop mini fridge. I meant to ask Vacupress, but I wonder if you could mix Unibond 800 while it's cold (however you define cold). It would extend the clamping time by a lot. You can look on the website, but I think 70 F is 3 hours of clamping.

    I'm looking forward to exploring epoxy too. I worked with a guy that used dixie cups 1/3 full or so and keep re-filling as necessary. I saw you can also buy products to slow the reaction. I was impressed with how easy epoxy was to use.
    Last edited by andrew whicker; 08-01-2021 at 8:31 PM.

  15. #15
    Tightbond extend is much more rigid than II or III, I believe unibond makes a ultra rigid pva but could just be marketing. Urea would be best bet, unibond 800, proglue… I believe proglue has the lowest formaldehyde off gassing if you are concerned about that, there may be others now. Of course there is epoxy as well….

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