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Thread: Textured Walls

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    450

    Textured Walls

    Hey Folks, my new workshop is about complete. Here in Texas homes have textured walls and the GC planned for textured in the shop. I feel texture on the walls would collect dust but wouldn't be a big deal to use the compressor to clean the walls when ever I'm cleaning up the shop. Of course, I could stay with no texture on the sheetrock but I do like textured look. Has anybody done textured walls or should I stay away from it? Definitely would like some opinions.
    chris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    57,919
    Personally, I would not do the texturing on the drywall for a shop; both because of the dust issue you mention and because the extra labor costs money. Smooth is better for this application, IMHO.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
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    1,294
    I had the 8'x 4' shets of white slick, hard finished beadboard. Not the primed stuff but the hard finish material. It is great(IMHO) because it does not carch or hold dust hardly at all.
    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    9,698
    My rented shop space has textured sheetrock. It does catch dust. But then, everything in a wood shop gets covered with dust anyhow.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Stahl View Post
    Hey Folks, my new workshop is about complete. Here in Texas homes have textured walls and the GC planned for textured in the shop. I feel texture on the walls would collect dust but wouldn't be a big deal to use the compressor to clean the walls when ever I'm cleaning up the shop. Of course, I could stay with no texture on the sheetrock but I do like textured look. Has anybody done textured walls or should I stay away from it? Definitely would like some opinions.
    It sounds like you should go for the discount sushi version of a Level 5 finish, i.e. no texture please sir this is an Arbyís. That is all.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    887
    I'd go for no texture. If you ever need to patch it, which seems likely, it will be easier.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    450
    I figured it wouldn't be popular. :-) I told the GC no texture. Thanks!
    chris

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Northeastern OK
    Posts
    77
    good choice on the texture. GC's texture walls because it is cheaper to spray spatter on mediocre drywall work than it is to get top notch (smooth) seams on wallboard. It takes very little skill to spray spatter and follow it with knockdown trowels to hide so-so drywall finishing. In a workshop, I would not be very critical about the drywall work but in my house it is a different story.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,311
    The so called knockdown texture is the cheap way out of good looking plaster. I think a proper plaster finish would be okay on a workshop wall. But that takes twice the mud and some skill.
    To me an interior finish that has the flat surface of paper showing looks cheap. It should be like a sidewalk finish.
    Bill D

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
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    4,321
    Your GC is cussing you right now. Note to all, tell your contactors early on if you want smooth walls. It's a completely different work process and price.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Rozmiarek View Post
    Your GC is cussing you right now. Note to all, tell your contactors early on if you want smooth walls. It's a completely different work process and price.
    Interestingly, around here, walls are rarely "not smooth" from a drywall standpoint. 'Don't even see popcorn ceilings all that much anymore. But you are correct, there's definitely a labor factor between the two methods.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Interestingly, around here, walls are rarely "not smooth" from a drywall standpoint. 'Don't even see popcorn ceilings all that much anymore. But you are correct, there's definitely a labor factor between the two methods.
    You mean, between doing something and doing nothing? Iíd think the GC would be _thrilled_ to be doing nothing and still getting paid for it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    In the foothills of the Sandia Mountains
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    15,792
    My shop, er, garage came with textured walls. It hasn't been a problem for me.
    Please help support the Creek.


    During the middle ages they celebrated the end of the plague with wine and orgies. Does anyone know if there is anything planned when this one ends?

    ---

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    San Diego, Ca
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    1,525
    I have a 24 x 36' shop with 10' ceilings. I hung my own drywall, taped the seams and sanded. The finish looked "pro". Then I sprayed on a light splatter finish to match the interior of my house. It doesn't seem to really collect any more dust than if the walls were smooth. So, it probably boils down to the OP's personal taste and cost. In my case, I did the work myself and found it kind of therapeutic.

  15. #15
    Smooth walls are more labor intensive than textured because of the time
    spent mudding and amount of sanding required to get a smooth wall, especially on less than exquisitely framed houses, which is 97 out of every 100. This obviously varies depending on how far you take it...you donít need Level 5 in your shop.

    Textured walls are typically cheaper because itís a spray on product that goes on fast and can hide some pretty quick and dirty (read:cheap) drywall hanging. Downside is that itís a dated and cheaper look (my opinion) and it does hold dust more and matching existing with a patch is not as simple as smooth walls.

    The exception to this would be old world / plaster style texture that can also hide some less than stellar drywall
    hanging but is potentially just as much or more labor (depending on desired texture details) as smooth and sanded walls.

    So no, itís not really the difference between doing something and doing nothing and can mean a big chunk of money in labor costs over the spread of an entire house (or large shop space.)
    Still waters run deep.

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