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Thread: SCMI SI12 short stroke sliding table saw - any owners here?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark e Kessler View Post
    Joe that’s a good point, although I can make it work I think I run into a scenario almost every project where having a little bit of table to the left of the blade would be benefit. Looks to be a good 6”, that might cause a little pain if you are doing smaller furniture pieces but am sure it’s workable

    to
    Mark, one big advantage of slider next to the blade is the ability to use a double miter. This gets a lot of use on my full length slider and is my go to for any small angle work and small straight cuts. I do a lot of curve work and it’s great for joining curve moulding to straight. That always involves two angles and with the double miter it’s easy to go back and fourth between angles. If I ever downsize I think I could make a subtable for the T17 to use the double miter.
    FB89BB71-3554-445C-ACF8-5ECA535BF08B.jpg
    3336B2D3-D3C5-4068-A90C-1BE199DFBE74.jpg
    And here is a example of where the slider next to blade is not so handy.
    33A06254-E266-481E-8F50-1E3F9392725A.jpg

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Auckland, New Zealand
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    my first wide belt sander was this colour series, very heavily built on a steel frame, probably the thickest gauge of steel, I am yet to see a thicker frame!
    I sold it because I needed a wider unit and double head, otherwise would have kept it.

    IMG_4017.JPG

  3. #33
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    May 2012
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    Gatineau, Québec
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    …not sure if this makes sense, but could some form of Fritz and Franz jig be adapted to make handling of small/short pieces easier?

    Looks like a nice piece of equipment.

    Regards,

    J.

  4. #34
    Philiip,
    I bought my SI12 new in 1991 when I made the decision to go pro full-time. I felt it was an important upgrade to processing panel stock, which is central to my business. A few observations about the saw: It is heavy and well constructed. Once the miter fence was initially adjusted square, I have never had to readjust it. It has stayed perfectly square for the past 30 years, and that goes for the 45 degree setting as well. The aluminum sliding table is a better choice than cast iron, very strong, and the extrusion allows for a closer fit to the blade. You can rip on this saw, although I keep a 10" Jet for ripping and dado operations. Slider is right tilt, Jet is left tilt. I need both options at different times. The stops on my SI12 are very accurate and reliable, no need to alter or replace them. I have made a living with this saw for the past 30 years, and have never regretted the purchase. I believe it was $5800.00 at the time. I have found that the space required for the saw is secondary to the space I need for the stock being fed through it. I need 10' to the left of the blade, and 16' in front and behind the blade. I use 10' conveyors in front and behind the saw to manage the boards going through. I would be happy to help with any questions you may have about the saw.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip Mitchell View Post
    Thanks for the replies; reassuring that I may have found a contender. I still have some due diligence to do, but it seems promising so far.

    Having limited use on a sliding saw, how is having the table away from the blade with short pieces (8” or less?) different than the way a miter gauge might work? This is how I typically crosscut now if not using a shop built cross cut sled for one reason or another. Is the potential annoyance of that simply that the short stock is sliding over the fixed part of the table (against the crosscut fence) and not actually touching the sliding table or am I missing something?
    The slider portion will be slightly above the cast so for pieces that only bridge the slider portion you would be at a slight (very slight) angle which may or may not affect the end result you are looking for, might be awkward as well. I haven’t used one like that but would imagine if you piece was short where it only rode on the cast it would work if you were holding the piece tight to the fence, just won’t move as smooth potentially.

    You could also build some type of bridge, something that would kinda look like a mini sled use on a cabinet saw, piece of ply with 2 returns on front and back to stiffen it, clamp it to the slide…may need to shim the bottom that rides the cast but might hang up a little depending on how well it is adjusted however you would be making short strokes so probably no big deal.

    i have made ply fixtures to cut narrow parts like bridal joints, dovetails…
    49A74DFB-80E2-4C39-9615-CF10013C57A4.jpg
    disclosure- not Mac’s clamps…
    A176415B-30F2-412E-A145-0FFB35034996.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    Mark, one big advantage of slider next to the blade is the ability to use a double miter. This gets a lot of use on my full length slider and is my go to for any small angle work and small straight cuts. I do a lot of curve work and it’s great for joining curve moulding to straight. That always involves two angles and with the double miter it’s easy to go back and fourth between angles. If I ever downsize I think I could make a subtable for the T17 to use the
    Joe, thanks for the picks. Would love to get the quadrant, i know you show the Martin here but is it difficult to put on and take off?

    also i would love if my saw had the ability to put the xcut fence in the middle of the outrigger, I find I do a lot of small and medium size cuts and it’s always a kinda uncomfortable reach when the fence is in the forward position, i like it in the rear position (operator side) for the smaller cuts but I always find myself moving it to the forward position at some point, a middle position would be a good compromise I thought I saw a saw that could do this was it a Martin?
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 07-31-2021 at 8:45 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  7. #37
    If you look into those saws you will find a number of configurations and models. In the two tone green there is the slider bar model and that leaves you with table top left of the blade maybe 7 inches cant remember,. Then the full sliding mechanism those will come both right up to the blade, then some with table top left of the blade. Just will depend on what you find for sale. They have a lot of different model numbers or letters after numbers and those sliders that design goes back to invincible models. Not sure if he beige one you posted is but will look. Usually heavier and same still today with them having an Invincible line.

  8. #38
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    [QUOTE=Mark e Kessler;3134343]
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    Mark, one big advantage of slider next to the blade is the ability to use a double miter. This gets a lot of use on my full length slider and is my go to for any small angle work and small straight cuts. I do a lot of curve work and it’s great for joining curve moulding to straight. That always involves two angles and with the double miter it’s easy to go back and fourth between angles. If I ever downsize I think I could make a subtable for the T17 to use the

    Joe, thanks for the picks. Would love to get the quadrant, i know you show the Martin here but is it difficult to put on and take off?

    also i would love if my saw had the ability to put the xcut fence in the middle of the outrigger, I find I do a lot of small and medium size cuts and it’s always a kinda uncomfortable reach when the fence is in the forward position, i like it in the rear position (operator side) for the smaller cuts but I always find myself moving it to the forward position at some point, a middle position would be a good compromise I thought I saw a saw that could do this was it a Martin?
    Mark,
    the double miter comes on and off easy. Just a simple lever clamp under. These are all pretty similar from the different mfgs. Just want to make sure you get one specific to your saw. They are spendy, if you don’t use one a lot Guido Henn shows how to make one in his book on sliders.
    F93EB1C5-850D-4367-8686-F97A175EBE60.jpg
    7A54EC7D-C14C-41D1-BD0A-04E89E073BD4.jpg

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip Mitchell View Post
    Thanks for the replies; reassuring that I may have found a contender. I still have some due diligence to do, but it seems promising so far.

    Having limited use on a sliding saw, how is having the table away from the blade with short pieces (8” or less?) different than the way a miter gauge might work? This is how I typically crosscut now if not using a shop built cross cut sled for one reason or another. Is the potential annoyance of that simply that the short stock is sliding over the fixed part of the table (against the crosscut fence) and not actually touching the sliding table or am I missing something?
    Phillip,
    The slider next to the blade is better in this respect but I wouldn’t let it be a deal breaker. In your case finding a used saw with all the parts and in decent condition is the main thing.
    Cutting short pieces is better than with a miter guage because of the rigidity of the cross fence. I made half of a F&F for the T17. Fence has to be in the front position to use it.
    BFBB6E9E-BBE8-4415-BE19-0183346D5CAC.jpg
    8BFFCB45-E89F-469F-82FD-E547E33A76DA.jpg

  10. #40
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    Phillip,
    The slider next to the blade is better in this respect but I wouldn’t let it be a deal breaker
    I'd think a slider like this would still be pretty useful for working with sheet goods and crosscuts.
    Are you giving up the ability to rip boards with the slider? (either a straight-line rip or a rip-to-width with a f&f jig)

    Matt

  11. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Hills View Post
    I'd think a slider like this would still be pretty useful for working with sheet goods and crosscuts.
    Are you giving up the ability to rip boards with the slider? (either a straight-line rip or a rip-to-width with a f&f jig)

    Matt
    I would be keeping my Tannewitz Model U for ripping and hopefully I can track down a dado arbor for it with some luck and patience. It has a beautiful 24” rack and pinion rip fence and I would try to nest it back to back with the fixed table portion of this sliding saw.
    Still waters run deep.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Hills View Post
    I'd think a slider like this would still be pretty useful for working with sheet goods and crosscuts.
    Are you giving up the ability to rip boards with the slider? (either a straight-line rip or a rip-to-width with a f&f jig)

    Matt
    Hi Matt
    very usefull for ripping and crosscuting. Limited by the short stroke for F&F. If this ever becomes my only saw I would straight line on it using the old Tage Frid style jig. For building cabinets from plywood I would probably do the dust cut with a track saw then proceed ripping and crosscuting on the saw.

  13. #43
    Join Date
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    There is an SI15 in my general area and for all I know it might be the one you are looking at. Cedar Falls Iowa? Price listed is $2250. Just throwing this out there. On Waterloo Iowa CL.

  14. #44
    Thanks Ronald. That is not the one I’m looking at, but does look reasonably complete and decent condition.

    The one I located (and pictured on the previous page) is outside of Boston / Metro West. If anyone reading this happens to be in the Boston area and willing to check the saw out for me in person, I would be grateful and offer compensation for your troubles. I’ve reached out to a couple local folks directly but no takers yet. I may start a thread asking for potential help - is that allowed, Jim and if so, where would be the ideal place to post it?
    Still waters run deep.

  15. #45
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    There is a fellow creeker in this area and he might be willing to have a look if you needed him to. I've met him and had a business transaction with him. He's probably 30 minutes away. I'm probably a solid 3 hours away so not much help.

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