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Thread: best woods for exterior paint grade wood rot repair

  1. #1
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    best woods for exterior paint grade wood rot repair

    Compiling a list. Recomendations?

  2. #2
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    Any of the species that's normally used for outdoor projects because of weather/insect resistance will do. White oak (not red oak) is a popular north American species for outdoor projects, for example. Mahogany, Sapele, teak, ipe, etc., are all popular imported species.

    But it would be helpful for you to be more specific about "what" you are repairing that has rot...it could make a difference in recommendations. Non structural? Man-made is a good option. IE PVC. There are also weatherproof (when painted) composite products available. So "what" are you repairing?
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Good point Jim. Mostly window trim, fascia boards & soffit repair.

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    I've got a pile of nice 20' long clear yellow pine boards, but I dont think that's the best material to use.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim mills View Post
    I've got a pile of nice 20' long clear yellow pine boards, but I dont think that's the best material to use.
    Primed pine is pretty much what the building trades use for those purposes if they are not opting for the PVC materials. it's cost effective and if primed on all sides, finished with quality paint and not subjected to standing/excess water, lasts well. LP has some very nice composite materials available for this purpose, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    If you use fir, pine , or any other conifer, the bark side must be the face ,or the wood can peel up sharp….and non paint holding layers.
    I like using the non oil base copper naphthalate for protection from rot.

  7. #7
    when i was getting my parents home read to sell I was going to paint the back garage door, never got to it, paint was starting to peel on a west facing door., 66 years old the door was still solid and could have been sanded with a dynabrade sealed and painted and carry on. thats 66 years but its old school cedar. Not old growth but it is better than now a day stuff.

    On my front porch the posts were old growth cedar and at 30 years they will still carry on while the deck board was failing years ago

  8. #8
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    As Jim said, primed/painted pine.

    John

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    Paint is so good these days, that if you can keep it from getting wet from the back, about anything will last. I painted an old house in 2008 with Sherwin Williams Duration. It was their top of the line paint at that time. I put a piece of blue masking tape in a place where it would get wet, but was out of common sight. I painted over the blue masking tape with some of the Duration. I was by there last week, and it's still there, like I painted it last week. Still waiting to see how long it will last.

  10. #10
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    Yea, the real key to trim is that it has to be painted on all surfaces including end-grain. (primer is fine on unseen areas) If one takes the time to do that, wood trim will last for a very long time. Good paint really matters. PVC doesn't have to be coated on all sides first, so it's a time saverin that respect (and durable), but at a substantially higher cost.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    I agree that painting all around helps , but the woods without a ‘good for exterior’ rating still rot. It was an unpleasant surprise for me;
    especially when they were painted on all surfaces. But I admit the paint adhered to the rotting wood ! That’s why I started using the
    copper naphthalate . I don’t do all of my house painting ,so I make sure to write specs and watch for untreated…specks.

  12. #12
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    Mel, I think a big part of rot issues isn't the material as much as it is the situation where water/moisture, for whatever reason, lingers which in turn promotes the rot. There's no harm in taking extra precautions, however, especially in areas where there will likely be a lot of moisture/water exposure that may or may not always drain away quickly. A close friend in Florida is dealing with this...fascia board where it joins the soffit near a gutter rotted. Again. Whomever fixed it in the past just replaced the bad board. They apparently didn't deal with the source of the moisture that was causing the rotting. Now it's a bigger issue.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    If you use fir, pine , or any other conifer, the bark side must be the face ,or the wood can peel up sharp….and non paint holding layers.
    I like using the non oil base copper naphthalate for protection from rot.

    I needed to hear this information as I have to replace some exterior trim. Thanks Mel. And you too Jim for bringing up this post Lots of good ideas makes things go better.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    As Jim said, primed/painted pine.

    John
    no way
    termites will love it.

    something more dense.
    Fir.
    With lots of rings.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Hollingsworth View Post
    no way
    termites will love it.

    something more dense.
    Fir.
    With lots of rings.
    Millions of houses have been built with pine trim. My parents' house was built in 1927 and still has the original white pine trim on it. They keep it painted.

    John

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