Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Used band saw questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    41

    Used band saw questions

    Recently found a 16" Grizzly band saw and I'm in the middle of tuning it up.

    1) How much is this used saw generally worth? Guy seemed knowledgeable and said it had a really good motor.
    2) What does the bearing above the two guide bearings do? Doesn't seem to touch anything.
    3) Guy said the thermal overload dial should be set according to certain parameters but I'm not sure what they are.
    4) Any clue about it's model number? All I could find was the sticker stating 16" band saw.
    5) The bottom wheel has some play in it so I need to replace the bearing. Any advice on replacing it? Doesn't seem like a socket has enough room to fit over that nut.

    1.jpg

    2.jpg

    3.jpg

    4.jpg

    5.jpg
    Last edited by brad hays; 07-19-2021 at 7:43 AM.
    If the end of the world ever comes move to Kentucky, because everything there happens 20 years later. ~ Mark Twain
    History began on July 4, 1776. Everything before that was a mistake. ~ Ron Swanson
    The economy of what you say lends more to it's meaning than the depth of it's exclamation.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    11,085
    Quote Originally Posted by brad hays View Post
    Recently found a 16" Grizzly band saw and I'm in the middle of tuning it up.
    1) How much is this used saw generally worth?
    ...]
    I know nothing about that saw. Curious, are you fixing it up to sell it or just want to know the value?

    The bearing above and positioned 90-deg to the guide bearings is a thrust bearing. Things are supposed to be adjusted so it is just barely not touching the back of the blade when running. It's purpose is to support the back of the blade during a cut.

    It's not touching anything because the guides are not properly adjusted. This is often due to the blade not properly positioned on the wheels, and that sometimes caused by wheel misalignment, adjustment, or worn tires. Blade misalignment seems more likely from your pictures since both the thrust bearing and guide bearings are not in the proper place relative to the blade. The front of the guide bearings should be just behind the gullets of the teeth. If the saw has an adjustment try that first and see if the blade will move closer to the thrust bearings. Check the tires on the wheels to see if they are worn out. To properly tune up one of my bandsaws I added thin washers behind one of the wheels.

    It looks like that saw has been run a long time with the guides out of adjustment. Whoever used that saw apparently didn't know quite enough about bandsaws. Those bearings are ready for immediate replacement! (they are cheap and easy to replace.)

    I've never had any Grizzly tools but it seems improbable that a company would make a wheel with a nut that couldn't be removed.

    If you are relatively new to bandsaws there is a book I recommend:
    "New Complete Guide to Bandsaws" by Mark Duginske https://smile.amazon.com/New-Complet.../dp/1565238419

    JKJ

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,311
    For the overload look at amps or FLA on the motor. If it is 15 amps set it to 100% if it is 7.5 amps set it to 50% etc.
    Bill D

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,311
    For the wheel nut you just need a thinwall deep socket. Do yourself a favor and make sure it is 6 point not 12. I assume a metric size. Use a pick and clean out the sawdust so a socket can go down full depth. Then give it a shot of penetrating oil while you wait to figure what socket you need.
    If worst comes to worst you may have to grind the outside of a socket down to get in there.
    I agree the guides are not set correctly. Replace the bad wheel bearing before fooling too much with the guides. A bad wheel bearing will not let the blade track correctly.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 07-19-2021 at 9:34 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,311
    Before replacing the wheel bearing remove the nut, clean the threads, then tighten it and see if that was the problem, unlikely. Any bearing use rubber sealed not shielded unless the rpm is over 7,000 or so. I use VXB in the LA area.
    Bill D

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,416
    Blog Entries
    1
    Those old 16" cast iron Grizzly's have done a lot of work. I also go to VXB for bearings and use sealed where I can. You may as well replace the guide bearings while you're at it so you get a fresh start. Others have covered everything pretty much. If you are going to remove the wheel to change bearings you may as well take a moment or two and setup the wheels as co-planer if they are not already.

    I also slipped a link belt on my 17" saw since I happened to have it. The thing runs spooky smooth and quiet ever since the alignment and belt. You may want to make or buy a throat plate that doesn't have the large gap around the blade. The importance of that will vary with how you use the saw. I can't tell from the pics if they have managed to hang on to the table pin. If it is lost you will want to make or buy a new one.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 07-19-2021 at 10:11 AM.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    27,726
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I know nothing about that saw. Curious, are you fixing it up to sell it or just want to know the value?

    The bearing above and positioned 90-deg to the guide bearings is a thrust bearing. Things are supposed to be adjusted so it is just barely not touching the back of the blade when running. It's purpose is to support the back of the blade during a cut.

    It's not touching anything because the guides are not properly adjusted. This is often due to the blade not properly positioned on the wheels, and that sometimes caused by wheel misalignment, adjustment, or worn tires. Blade misalignment seems more likely from your pictures since both the thrust bearing and guide bearings are not in the proper place relative to the blade. The front of the guide bearings should be just behind the gullets of the teeth. If the saw has an adjustment try that first and see if the blade will move closer to the thrust bearings. Check the tires on the wheels to see if they are worn out. To properly tune up one of my bandsaws I added thin washers behind one of the wheels.

    It looks like that saw has been run a long time with the guides out of adjustment. Whoever used that saw apparently didn't know quite enough about bandsaws. Those bearings are ready for immediate replacement! (they are cheap and easy to replace.)

    I've never had any Grizzly tools but it seems improbable that a company would make a wheel with a nut that couldn't be removed.

    If you are relatively new to bandsaws there is a book I recommend:
    "New Complete Guide to Bandsaws" by Mark Duginske https://smile.amazon.com/New-Complet.../dp/1565238419

    JKJ
    I have that book and it is excellent!
    Ken

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Spartanburg South Carolina
    Posts
    89
    And with that recommendation, book is ordered. Thank You

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    322
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by brad hays View Post
    Recently found a 16" Grizzly band saw and I'm in the middle of tuning it up.

    1) How much is this used saw generally worth? Guy seemed knowledgeable and said it had a really good motor.
    2) What does the bearing above the two guide bearings do? Doesn't seem to touch anything.
    3) Guy said the thermal overload dial should be set according to certain parameters but I'm not sure what they are.
    4) Any clue about it's model number? All I could find was the sticker stating 16" band saw.
    5) The bottom wheel has some play in it so I need to replace the bearing. Any advice on replacing it? Doesn't seem like a socket has enough room to fit over that nut.

    1.jpg

    2.jpg

    3.jpg

    4.jpg

    5.jpg
    Brad you had a question about setting the motor thermal overload.

    Typically, overloads are set for a current value. A motor with a SF (Service Factor) of 1 would have the overload set at the motor's full load current at the voltage you are operating it at. The motor full load current should be listed on the motor for each of the voltages it is designed to operate at. Technically you can do a little math if the voltage doesn't match the nominal utility voltage at your location but to simplify it I'd just set it at the FLA value listed on the nameplate.

    The overload indicates 15A and that would indicate to me the 100% value is 15A (16.5A for 110%, etc.). If the motor FLA is 15 A at the voltage you're operating at then use the 100% value.

    The SF comes into play as well. For example if the SF is 1.15 you could increase the setting by ... you guessed it ... 1.15x.

    To play it safe you could leave out the SF portion and just set it as if the SF is 1 (if it isn't). Then if you have any nuisance trips, you know you could turn it up a little and take advantage of the 1.15 SF rating. Otherwise, you're in good shape and your motor is protected from an overload condition.

    If you're still unsure - post a picture of the motor nameplate and I can see if I can decipher it for you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    41
    Thanks for the info. John. I paid $235, $15 off the original asking price of $250 for the loose wheel bearing. Yes new tires and guide bearings are first on my list. I've been spending a ton of money lately so I'm going cheap as I can. I found tires at around $20/pair for my 12" band saw but I'm not having near the luck sourcing for a 16". Cheapest I've found is $40 so I'm gonna keep looking hoping for something cheaper. Don't like cutting corners but cheap will have to do for now. Thanks for the book recommendation too, that's on my to get list now.

    Thanks too Bill. I'll make sure to re-seat that wheel nut before I spend for a new bearing.

    Thanks for the recommendation for making the wheels co-planer. My best guess for how to do it would be to use a long level. I'm sure there's a vid on the youtubes explaining it all. The table pin sounds like something on the underside. It looks like the two circle table support pieces have been replaced as they're brown and everything else is green. What's the table pin and where is it located? Probably need to put that on my list too.
    If the end of the world ever comes move to Kentucky, because everything there happens 20 years later. ~ Mark Twain
    History began on July 4, 1776. Everything before that was a mistake. ~ Ron Swanson
    The economy of what you say lends more to it's meaning than the depth of it's exclamation.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •