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Thread: Input Needed on Leveling 16" Jointer on Garage Floor

  1. #1

    Input Needed on Leveling 16" Jointer on Garage Floor

    After a ~7 month wait I finally got my 16" Grizzly G9953ZX jointer which is staged in my garage workshop. The garage floor, like most, is sloped toward garage door openings. I want to ensure the unit is; 1) level, and 2) not going to conform to any out of flat / twist condition the concrete floor may have as I know cast iron will conform to what it is sitting on. I am looking at using machine leveling mounts. Has anyone used machine level mounts on a large jointer or other similar large heavy piece and have suggestions on how they did setup? Once this is done I will then do final setup to ensure coplanar and squareness of the table/fence. Unit weight is ~1,650 lbs. Any suggestion or input would be appreciated. Yes, I maybe be a bit OCD but trying to do the right thing as well.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    I can’t quite see the details of how a leveling bolt would mount to the base, but bolts with multiple nuts will also accomplish the same thing as pre-made machine leveling mounts, which admittedly I have never used. Do you have a link to the one you’re considering.

    How out of plane is the floor where the jointer will sit?

    I have a 12” Oliver 166 jointer which weighs around 2000 lbs and contacts the floor much further out towards each end with each end being cast iron in a large U shape where it touches the floor. This design is much more susceptible to twist from an out of plane floor and can cause some adjustment issues because of the cast iron moving to follow the twist in the floor as you mention.

    My floor, amazingly, is flat and coplanar in the spot where the jointer lives and doesn’t have twist in the base, but if it did then I would absolutely use levelers, be they large diameter bolts and nuts or something manufactured specifically for that. You may also be able to get minor twist out with shimming under the low spots with metal/washers, but this is less reliable than some type of permanently mounted leveling setup and wouldn’t be the preferred option if more than just a corner or 2 had to be shimmed more than say 1/4”.
    Still waters run deep.

  3. #3
    have one in a place that is wonky. I used Hockey pucks and wood shims. Its likely a bit too high now but will do for now.

    Patrick who was here in the past had some super high quality levellors on his Martin table saw and maybe other machines as well. Best ones ive seen. There is lots on you tube on how to turn hockey pucks into floor levellors with threaded rod and some Mcgiver.

    Hopefully he doesnt mind me posting this, if so likely I live far enough away . Mercedes machine with Michelin tires.



    Levelling.jpg
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 07-17-2021 at 3:05 PM.

  4. #4
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    These from McMaster Carr look like they would work well with your machine base. Allowing you to level end to end and side to side as necessary.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/leveling-pa...threaded-stud/

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    These from McMaster Carr look like they would work well with your machine base. Allowing you to level end to end and side to side as necessary.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/leveling-pa...threaded-stud/
    I use the 1/2" thread, 2" diameter ones on cabinets I build for a company that puts precision test machines on top of them. They are very robust, very well made, and easy to adjust. A potential downside for leveling a jointer is they will increase the height at least 1-1/4".

    John

  6. #6
    yeah mines too high. Some sort of outboard or inside then could be figured out so the whole thing is on starting at the base of the machine but rather higher up. If something is on the outside its going to have to look pretty pro or it will bug me and I like being able to stand and move where I want and not have stuff in the way.

  7. #7
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    For a heavy tool that is to be stationary, my preference is to use shims rather than leveling feet. Why? You can use shims that cover the entire area of the "foot" rather than concentrating the weight on the stem of a leveling bolt. But that's me. Others might disagree.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
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    Level is not required. Does it have three feet or is it four? Level is often used simply because it makes it easier to determine planer and remove twist.
    Many folks make the mistake of ending up too tall on the adjustment. I would set them maybe 3/8" up and them move them down too level. The less extension on the bolt the less leverage acting to bend it around.
    Depending on your height and width of boards you may want to set the machine higher then stock. If so use shims not longer bolts.
    Bill

  9. #9
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    Bill, it's true that a jointer doesn't have to be level...but many of us prefer our tools to be level. At the very least, our 10,000 pencils will not roll off the surface.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
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    I agree with Jim's shims.

    I would mark the precise location of the jointer on the floor with a sharpie, move the jointer out of the way, shim the floor with tapered shims at the 3 low corners to be perfect in all directions, then measure each shim thickness and make the 3 required shims out of a very hard wood or metal. This way you will know you are placing the jointer on a level surface and any twist that might have developed while it was sitting on the uneven floor, will correct itself.

    I see your OCD and call.

    I'm getting Crocodile Dundee moments comparing my 8" Grizzly to that monster.

    "That's not a jointer, Now THAT'S a jointer!"

    Enjoy!

  11. #11
    The correct way to permanently install heavy machines is as follows:
    [1] Position the machine in it final location.
    [2] shim into perfect level
    [3] install epoxy anchors into the concrete floor, thus fastening into permanent location
    [4] Grout the complete base with a hi-strength cementious grout. use about 1" thick grout at minimum thickness.
    [5] allow to cure as per mfgr's instructions
    [6] enjoy
    I've installed hundreds and hundreds (if not thousands) of piece equipment, tanks, pumps, etc in this manner with no failures. This is the only way corporate America handles this issue. This was my business for 40 years.
    And by the way, total cost for epoxy embed anchors and hi-strength grout should be less than $100. And 'NO' don't expect to find anyone in Lowe's or HD that knows anything about fastening down heavy machinery.
    Last edited by Ira Matheny; 07-17-2021 at 8:59 PM. Reason: spelling, grammer

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ira Matheny View Post
    The correct way to permanently install heavy machines is as follows:
    [1] Position the machine in it final location.
    [2] shim into perfect level
    [3] install epoxy anchors into the concrete floor, thus fastening into permanent location
    [4] Grout the complete base with a hi-strength cementious grout. use about 1" thick grout at minimum thickness.
    [5] allow to cure as per mfgr's instructions
    [6] enjoy
    I've installed hundreds and hundreds (if not thousands) of piece equipment, tanks, pumps, etc in this manner with no failures. This is the only way corporate America handles this issue. This was my business for 40 years.
    And by the way, total cost for epoxy embed anchors and hi-strength grout should be less than $100. And 'NO' don't expect to find anyone in Lowe's or HD that knows anything about fastening down heavy machinery.
    THIS IS THE PROPER WAY
    the above is okay for smaller machines, for what you have it needs done as above
    Ron

  13. #13
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    The Manuel for my jointer also says to level it and grout in place. It also says not to bolt it down. The manufacturer says the concrete foundation should be at least 6 inches thick. Im short for sure
    Ive got 2inchs of slope to my shop floor and a live oak tree roots that add more whenever it wants.
    My jointer has oil bath bearings so I believe the level part is important.
    Aj

  14. #14
    I have a sloping garage floor as well, I just use a shim to make up the difference. If the frame twists due floor not being level than you have other issues… On my slider I used 4” levelers from mcmaster carr (2531K128) with extra thick washers, the slider is one that I want close to level so the slide stays put when not using it…

    its the one on the right…obviously 🤪
    EB5ED23D-A6FD-4285-A783-2ACBD8B125E4.jpg

  15. #15
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    All of this is a lot of words that in the end, boil down to Jim's shims.

    Shim the floor.

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