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Thread: Sanding Sponge?

  1. #1
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    Sanding Sponge?

    Tool? I think so, I have some profile molding in my kitchen that I need to sand which my palm sander can't get to. I am thinking about these sanding sponges so that I can get into those cracks and round overs and maybe press hard so that they can fit profile. Well these sponges are little over 3.00 a piece but if they work then its worth it. Any suggest on what sponges and where to buy vs HD or Lowes?
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  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    I have a variety of hard rubber sanding forms. Some from Lee Valley and some from one of the shows. Unlike a sponge, the hard rubber blocks do not foul sharp details of the profile.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  4. #4
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    I have first hand experience in using a sanding sponge in that they can easily round over edges and erase small detail if you are not very careful. When you try to get into small coves, grooves, etc you may end up putting more pressure on the edges of the cove, rounding off a crisp edge. I would recommend a set of hard forms like Glenn referred to.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  5. #5
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    I use them all the time, and mostly for the same purpose you're thinking about. I don't think there is any difference between the ones sold in Lowes, Home Depot, Sherwin-Williams, etc. You want the fine ones with the angled edges.

  6. #6
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    What about the 3M pads? Might be worth a look.

  7. #7
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    I use the large 3M ones all the time for sanding drywall.
    I never had a lot of luck using them for anything else.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  8. #8
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    But this looks like it is painted and he is just prepping for repainting. They should work for that.

  9. #9
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    That's what I use them for. They work fine.

  10. #10
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    Different strokes for different folks!
    Like a couple others mentioned, I prefer using something harder.
    Trying to not put too much pressure on the sponge is more work than I care to put into a job I despise doing anyhow.

    I mean - - really - sanding has to rank way down there with loading/unloading materials as being one of the lesser enjoyed aspects of this activity (woodworking).
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  11. #11
    the lee valley things work well and are easy to hold onto. Rolled stick on autobody tape like 3M makes 2 3/4" work well on those blocks. When I was in school one of the teachers said you will hate sanding. I never have, he wasnt a very good teacher. Lucky we had some good ones.

    There has to be some amount of hardness to the block depending on what type of wood you are sanding

  12. #12
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    You can pretty easily make a sanding block with the exact profile of your molding. Get a can of Bondo or equivalent. Car parts stores sell it, and paint stores generally do too. Put a piece of plastic film on the molding. For instance, a plastic bag. Mix up a blob of Bondo. Press it into the molding, with the plastic film protecting the molding from the Bondo. Shape the back side of the Bondo to make it easy to grasp. Or embed a piece of wood in the back side of the Bondo for a handle. When the Bondo cures you have a sanding block which is exactly the shape of the molding. Using it, you can get down into the deep valleys of the molding, without rounding over the tops.

  13. #13
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    I use the fine sanding pads that are in my local Benjamin Moore paint store. They are inexpensive, and are perfect for painted surfaces.
    Last edited by Chess Baloo; 07-13-2021 at 9:07 AM.

  14. #14
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    Thanks for all the fantastic ideals, its a painted surface which I want to kinda rough up some so the primer will stick. I was buying the blocks at HD which was little over 3.00 ea which would last maybe day or so. The blocks were getting clog up due to paint which is little over 30yrs old.

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