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Thread: New chisel.. arrived chipped.

  1. #1

    New chisel.. arrived chipped.

    I bought a new set of chisels.. and one of them came with a chip in the corner edge.
    Could not find the chip in the box.. so must have happened before packaging.
    Now.. is this salvageable?
    Do I have to grind the living xxxx out of it to re establish edge.

    One would think a edge would bend before chipping...


    Hope the photos are showing?

    IMG_0122.jpg
    IMG_0121.jpg

  2. #2
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    Who did you buy it from? Id request a return/replacement of the damaged chisel. Most reputable dealers/manufacturers will agree to that.

  3. #3
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    Now.. is this salvageable?
    Do I have to grind the living xxxx out of it to re establish edge.

    One would think a edge would bend before chipping...


    Hope the photos are showing?
    Hi Dan,

    Yes this chisel is salvageable. My reaction would depend on where the chisels were purchased.

    Though most likely it would be corrected in a few minutes on my Veritas Power Sharpening System or on my four foot long granite block with abrasive paper.

    If the edge bent before chipping, that would be a chisel to be sent back. Chisels should be hardened steel which doesn't tend to bend.

    The photos are showing to see photos one needs to become a Contributor, a good annual $6 investment.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Borger, Texas
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    Hi Dan,

    It really comes down to just what seems best to you. In my case I would keep it, grind a new bevel if that is something you regularly do, sharpen, and you are in business. However, if you are more comfortable with just honing and not grinding, I would send it back.

    For me, my carpentry chisels are Stanley chisels probably mostly from the 70s. My woodworking chisels are all vintage except a new 1/8th inch Stanley Sweetheart, so almost all of my chisels have needed serious efforts to get them back in business. Thus, for me a tiny chip out of the business end of a new chisel would be no big deal, and sending it back would be more trouble than it would be worth.

    Thus, for me, it still comes down to whatever is most comfortable for you. Good luck.

    Regards,

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 06-13-2021 at 3:41 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Im with Jim and Stew on this one, but Im assuming this is a relatively low priced chisel ($10-$30) range. If it is of the more expensive lines, Id probably return it on principle. You paid full price, the supplier should deliver a defect free product.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Perth, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Kraakenes View Post
    I bought a new set of chisels.. and one of them came with a chip in the corner edge.
    Could not find the chip in the box.. so must have happened before packaging.
    Now.. is this salvageable?
    Do I have to grind the living xxxx out of it to re establish edge.

    One would think a edge would bend before chipping...


    Hope the photos are showing?

    IMG_0122.jpg
    IMG_0121.jpg
    Dan, what will you do if you drop a chisel and the edge chips? It happens. Or, you may wish to change the angle of the primary bevel at some stage. So, have you planned for this, such as a way to grind bevels?

    The chip in the edge above is non-consequential when you are in a position to grind your own blades. There are many ways to use powered tools here, which I recommend over hand grinding on a stone.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Indy
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    With all due respect to other's opinions, I would not grind a good chisel on a typical two-wheel machine unless you have a lot of machine grinding experience. A lawn-mower blade; yes. There is too much chance for loosing the temper by over-heating the blade. I'm guessing that may be a Richter chisel. If it was mine, I would hand-hone that chip out of the edge by making a 30 degree secondary bevel using a diamond stone or other coarse stone and a side-clamping honing guide. Then. finish the secondary bevel on a fine stone. The added bonus of the secondary bevel is more edge durability. I use secondary bevels on chisels that are 3/8" and wider.

    New chisels may not have their best edges until the factory edge is lapped back during your routine sharpening, anyway. If it chips more during use, there might be an issue with the metal or the temper that would warrant contacting the vendor.
    Last edited by Mike Brady; 06-14-2021 at 2:56 PM.

  8. #8
    Good eye there Mike Brady.
    Yes, they are Richter chisels.


    I haven't gotten my garage/workshop up and running yet, so its only fine stone polishing for me.
    I am not set up to regrind. I have a Tormek in my "to buy list".

    I have not bothered the store selling me the set.. You guys keep telling me its possible to fix with some effort.
    They did offer a discount or replacement.

    I am more frustrated that Narex themselves not even replying too my questions. Since it happened before packaging.
    Ill look elsewhere for chisels going forward..

  9. #9
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    I am more frustrated that Narex themselves not even replying too my questions. Since it happened before packaging.
    Isn't Narex located in Czechoslovakia?

    it may be there isn't anyone monitoring their email who can read English.

    With mass produced products it is possible less than 1 of 100 items is given a full quality assurance inspection, errors happen.

    Once the product is handed over to the packing & shipping department, it is being packed, not inspected.

    Some companies have a higher degree of involvement at every step. That costs more for a company to have more employees along the line responsible for product inspections.

    Narex has placed themselves in a position of producing a quality tool at the lower end of the price scale.

    The silver lining? Once you hone past the nick, you will hopefully be past the softer metal edge many experience with a new chisel or plane iron.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fairbanks AK
    Posts
    825
    Hey Dan. One of my resolutions for 2021 was to stay out of sharpening threads here, but this is not technically a sharpening thread. Over the course of your lifetime you will, more often than any of us care to admit, cause worse chips than that to come off of your edged tools. It is a shop, stuff happens.

    Your location does not show in your profile. If you are in Fairbanks you may drop me a private message here and I can have you over between 0800 and 1000 tomorrow to get that little thing handled and put you back in business. If you are in Delta or Healy or Livengood and need a little time to plan we can talk.

    You are going to need a two wheeled grinder some day. I bought a six inch and now wish I had scraped a few more pennies together for a grinder that could handle 8 inch wheels.

    It does suck that you have a new chisel, a fine stone, and the new chisel has a chip in it. Once your sharpening is set up, no problem. We have all been there. I have a stack of straight firewood in my garage right now with paint on the end grain to keep it moist, ready to go under the froe for chair parts; but I am waiting on parts for my oilstone system to get my drawknives back into shape.

    If your zip code is 997xx drop me a note and we will have you in business before lunch tomorrow.

  11. #11
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    Apr 2017
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    Michigan
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    Tormek is good but my tool of choice is a coarse diamond stone, then the water stones.

  12. #12
    Join Date
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    I would be using a bench grinder to 1st remove the chipped edge, then hollow grind your primary bevel, then its onto the bench stones to form a slightly steeper secondary bevel.

    Stewie;

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