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Thread: What are you wearing on your feet in your concrete slab shop?

  1. #1

    What are you wearing on your feet in your concrete slab shop?

    Just had a week off, and spend most of it in the shop, milling up some (a lot) of reclaimed oak for cabinets. I find, that at about 7-8 hours, my feet/legs are killing me. Wearing sneakers. Concrete slab, floor coverings aren't an option as I need to wheel things around my shop frequently, as well as clean the floor, and I do more than woodworking in there (keep the beater running, e.g). For those of you that do this for a living, what's the magic shoe? I feel like I should be able to go 9-11 hours. Bear in mind, this is not 9 hours at a time. I take many breaks, LOL!

  2. #2
    I use a padded piano bench and try to sit whenever I can. Something else that has helped the knees and hips, during my whole hip destruction and replacement I put an aluminum ramp over the step up from my garage to the house. I left it there, a ramp is so much easier.

  3. #3
    One of the first lessons learned was that no footwear was to expensive. My arsenal consist of high dollar loggers like Redwings and Danners along with quality hiking boots like Asolo. All are equipped with aftermarket foot beds. I can barely walk 20 minutes in casual sneakers and dress shoes, but can stand for 8 hours straight in my workboots with no pain. Proper support is everything. As soon as your body starts compensating for unstable shoes, you're going to start developing fatigue issues.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    In the foothills of the Sandia Mountains
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    15,751
    Orthofeet sneakers and rubber mats. I can’t stand on bare concrete very long.
    Get yourself a 3x3 mat and move it to where you need it.
    Please help support the Creek.


    During the middle ages they celebrated the end of the plague with wine and orgies. Does anyone know if there is anything planned when this one ends?

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Colson View Post
    Just had a week off, and spend most of it in the shop, milling up some (a lot) of reclaimed oak for cabinets. I find, that at about 7-8 hours, my feet/legs are killing me. Wearing sneakers. Concrete slab, floor coverings aren't an option as I need to wheel things around my shop frequently, as well as clean the floor, and I do more than woodworking in there (keep the beater running, e.g). For those of you that do this for a living, what's the magic shoe? I feel like I should be able to go 9-11 hours. Bear in mind, this is not 9 hours at a time. I take many breaks, LOL!
    There have been some good discussions about this in the not too distance past, if you can find them.

    I personally have had a lot of foot pain for many years until I switched to Oofos. I wear these all day, every day, everywhere - moving horses, driving tractor, walking 6 to 12 miles a day on the farm, and standing on concrete for hours. No more pain. https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AECHSZ4
    They are spongy inside with good arch support. They work so well for me I won't wear anything else for an extended time but I don't know how much depends on my particular foot shape.

    I have recommended them to a number of friends and others and have gotten some positive feedback.

    JKJ

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    southeast Michigan
    Posts
    316
    I have anti fatigue mats at most machines and my assembly table but if I am standing too long my back would get sore and I would have to sit for a while. Before retirement I had a coworker who swore by the shoes that have springs in the heel area. I always wanted to try them but the few companies that made them never had wide widths. Then a few months ago I saw a magazine ad from a company called Gravity Defyer, and they had wide widths. So I bought a pair of their walking shoes and my back and knee pains have gone away. They work so well for me that I even bought a second pair.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    263
    I put racedeck tiles in a number of years ago with the optional shock towers and it made all the difference with my back. After two lower back surgeries I had to do something. It takes a little abuse from the cabinet saw with its mobile base but everything else rolls easy enough. Garage journal forum members I think still get a discount. Check over there in the flooring forum. Good luck

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    5,778
    I live in Air Nike Running shoes. Anything else not only makes my feet get tired, but slows up my movement. No pictures of shops with concrete floors, but there are a couple. The only time I wear boots is if I'm running a chainsaw, that would throw chips in low shoes. Air Nike Service boots then.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Tom M King; 06-13-2021 at 8:14 AM.

  9. #9
    New Balance running shoes. The $130.00 ones. Full timer, never have any back pain. Careful what you drop, these don't have the protection of Red Wings.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    NH seacoast
    Posts
    272
    I recently moved into new shop with concrete floors. Went to Reds Shoe Barn in Dover NH to find appropriate footwear. Very busy old school shoe store with at least a half dozen actual human shoe salesmen. I was approached by a twenty something salesman and told him I was all set. Proceeded to find the oldest salesman on the floor and asked what I should buy for concrete floor. His first question was if I needed steel toe. No was my answer. He proceeded to show me a sneaker that I would never have considered on my own. I absolutely love my Hoka sneakers. Most comfortable shoe I have ever worn.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    I have boots from Crockett and Jones, the traditional shoe makers do a very fine job of making proper support.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    223
    I used to wear running shoes until I managed to drop a large piece of plywood, corner down, onto my toe. Crunch. Ouch. I now wear Timberland Pro work shoes with an alloy toe. They are even more comfortable standing all day on my concrete garage floor and pretty light with the alloy reinforced toe.
    I had been considering putting wooden flooring down for comfort but now find that unnecessary.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    2,800
    Good, well fitting, real running shoes, either road or trail, are what's most comfortable to me. Even after having logged to many kilometers to be used for running anymore, they're still great for shop use. Plenty of cushion & the support my feet in all the right ways.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
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    4,236
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Giles View Post
    New Balance running shoes. The $130.00 ones. Full timer, never have any back pain. Careful what you drop, these don't have the protection of Red Wings.

    Same here. I've tried others, keep coming back to these. Redwing's with Vibram soles aren't terrible, but the NB are more comfortable.

  15. #15
    Sneakers or light hiking boots with GOOD aftermarket insoles: Sole, Superfeet, etc.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

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